School of Nursing

http://nursing.hsc.wvu.edu

Degrees Offered

  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing
  • Master of Science in Nursing Executive Focus/MBA
  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing to Doctor of Nursing Practice
  • Doctor of Nursing Practice
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing

Introduction

The mission of the WVU School of Nursing is to lead in improving health in West Virginia and the broader society through excellence in student-centered educational programs, research and scholarship, the compassionate practice of nursing, and service to the public and the profession. This mission is responsive to changing healthcare needs and emerging national and state changes in technology and healthcare delivery and is enhanced by a supportive and open environment.  The faculty’s educational effort is directed at providing high quality, student-centered programs of instruction at all levels which prepare superb professional nurses to meet basic healthcare needs; advance practiced nurses to address complex health needs; and enable doctorally educated nurses to advance nursing knowledge through research, to assist in the formulation of policies to improve health care, and to serve as faculty in higher degree programs. Unique characteristics of the state mandates that the healthcare needs of rural populations and vulnerable groups be a major focus of education, research, and service, including faculty practice.

The School of Nursing offers undergraduate, graduate, and post graduate certificate programs of study. The baccalaureate program (BSN) is available for high school graduates who aspire to a career in nursing (basic students) and to registered nurses (RN) who are licensed graduates of associate degree or diploma nursing programs seeking to continue their career development. In addition, a BS/BA to BSN program is available for the college graduate seeking a BSN.

The WVU School of Nursing and the WVU College of Business & Economics offer a dual master's degree program to provide the skills and knowledge necessary to serve as a nurse leader. This blended degree program (totaling 67 credit hours) is done predominately online, and includes four 3-4 day residencies. Students take courses from both the MSN and MBA program concurrently. Graduates of the MSN (Executive Focus) and MBA program can work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, private practice, nonprofit organizations and public sectors.

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing to Doctor of Nursing Practice (BSN-DNP) prepares baccalaureate prepared nurses for advanced practice roles in primary care. These roles include family nurse practitioner and pediatric nurse practitioner specialties.  Students are awarded the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree and are eligible to sit for certification as an advanced practice nurse upon completing 48 hours of the program.  At that time they may progress to the DNP or select to exit the program with the MSN degree.

Post-graduate nurse practitioner certificate programs for family nurse practitioner and pediatric nurse practitioner are available for those who already have an MSN.

The doctor of nursing practice (DNP) prepares advanced practice nurses who will practice at the highest level of professional nursing and will advance the application of nursing knowledge for the purpose of improving healthcare for diverse populations.

The doctor of philosophy in nursing (PhD) prepares nurse scholars/scientists for roles in research, teaching and service.  The program prepares graduates who will contribute to the body of nursing knowledge, educate the next generation, and lead, ultimately impacting health policy, improving health, and reducing disparity.

Accreditation

Initial accreditation was received with graduation of the first class in 1964. The baccalaureate as well as advanced practice programs in nursing are fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, a national accrediting agency.

Fees, Expenses, Housing, Transportation, and Immunization

Students enrolling at the Morgantown campus pay fees which are detailed at http://admissions.wvu.edu/pay. Special fees and deposits are also required. Students enrolling at other sites pay the fees shown in the catalog for that site. Fees are subject to change without notice. Students’ expenses vary according to the course of study and individual needs. Information concerning financial assistance, application forms, and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form may be obtained from the financial aid website at http://financialaid.wvu.edu/home/hsc-office or by contacting the HSC Financial Aid Office, PO Box 9810, Morgantown, WV 26506-9810; telephone (304) 293-3706 (toll free) or 1-800-344-WVU1.

The University Housing and Residence Life Office, telephone (304) 293-4491, provides information concerning university-owned housing.  The Student Life Office in E. Moore Hall, telephone (304) 293-5611, provides information concerning privately owned, off-campus housing.

Students are expected to provide their own transportation, equipment, and instruments for the clinical courses. Some clinical experiences require travel in a multi-county area.

Proof of specific immunizations is required for all health sciences students. Students in the BSN, BA/BS to BSN, BSN-DNP, and Post graduate certificate master of science in nursing program must undergo a criminal background check prior to clinical courses. Felony convictions and serious misdemeanors may preclude participation in the clinical courses. This could, in turn, prevent the completion of course requirements and completion of the nursing program.

Scholarships

The School of Nursing offers several scholarships. These scholarships are administered by the Health Science Center Financial Aid Office and require completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form in order to be considered for financial aid. Most School of Nursing scholarships are available only to students already admitted to the School of Nursing and are awarded each April for the following academic year. However, there are a limited number of scholarships for which students may apply before admission. Further information is provided on the School of Nursing website: http://nursing.hsc.wvu.edu/academics/current-students/.

Additional Information

Visit the School of Nursing website at http://nursing.hsc.wvu.edu/.  Call the WVU school of Nursing Office of Student Services at 1-866-WVUNURS or (304) 293-1386. Write to WVU School of Nursing at PO Box 9600, Morgantown, WV 26506-9600

Degree Designation Learning Goals

Master of Science in Nursing Executive Focus/MBA

Upon successful completion of the program, the graduate will:

  • Synthesize theories, research findings, and broad-based perspectives for application in the advanced practice of nursing or nursing leadership:
  1. Integrate nursing and related sciences into the delivery of advanced nursing care to diverse populations.
  2. Synthesize evidence for practice to determine appropriate application of interventions across diverse populations.
  3. Utilize nursing and related science evidence to analyze, design, implement and evaluate nursing care delivery systems.
  • Utilize systematic inquiry and refined analytical skills in the provision of health care services and leadership:
  1. Integrate organizational science and informatics to make changes in the care environment to improve health outcomes.
  2. Assume a leadership role in the management of human, fiscal, and physical healthcare resources.
  3. Critically appraise existing literature to identify best practices, apply knowledge to improve and facilitate systems of care in order to improve patient outcomes.
  4. Disseminate results through translational scholarship.
  • Demonstrate safe, effective assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation skills in managing the care of individuals and groups while working in interprofessional collaborative relationships.
  1. Create a relationship with clients and healthcare organizations that builds and maintains a supportive and caring partnership.
  2. Analyze best practice evidence to implement effective quality improvement initiatives with measurable results.
  3. Advocates for patients, families, caregivers, communities and members of the healthcare team.
  • Articulate viewpoints and positions in order to improve the quality of health care delivery and outcomes of successful care.
  1. Assume a leadership role in effectively implementing patient safety and quality improvement initiatives within the context of the interprofessional team using effective communication skills.
  2. Examine the effect of legal and regulatory processes on nursing practice, healthcare delivery, and outcomes.
  3. Use ethical decision making to promote the well-being of individuals, families, and health care professionals in local, national & international communities.
  • Consults and collaborates in interdisciplinary and interagency endeavors to advance culturally sensitive health care to clients, families, groups, and communities:
  1. Synthesize broad ecological, global and social determinants of health; principles of genetics and genomics; and epidemiologic data to design and deliver evidence-based, culturally relevant clinical preventions interventions and strategies.
  • Integrates prior and current learning as a basis for growth and accountability in enacting the role of advanced practice nurse or nurse leader:
  1. Advocate for patients, families, caregivers, communities, and members of the healthcare team.
  2. Use information and communication technologies to advance patient education, enhance accessibility of care, analyze practice patterns, and improve health care outcomes, including nurse sensitive outcomes.
  3. Value life-long learning and continued professional development.
  • Assume a leadership role in advocacy, ethical issues, and health care policy development:
  1. Apply leadership skills and decision making in the provision of culturally responsive, high-quality nursing care, healthcare team coordination, and the oversight and
    accountability for care delivery and outcomes.
  2. Function as a leader and change agent in nursing and in health care delivery systems particularly to insure quality care for vulnerable and underserved populations.
  3. Demonstrates organizational and systems leadership that continually improves health outcomes and ensures patient safety.
  • Integrates all the functional areas of business into management decisions in a global environment.
  1. Evaluate factors that influence the competitive behavior of the firm.
  2. Predict and anticipate company and market responses to external factors.
  3. Identify the risks and opportunities in global markets.
  • Identify problems, collect appropriate data and analyze the data to make informed management decisions.
  1. Evaluate business reports to make meaningful decisions for the organization.
  2. Make data-driven, fact-based decisions using statistical techniques and principles.
  3. Take real world problems and express them in quantitative terms.
  • Make management decisions in an ethically sensitive and socially responsible manner.
  1. Negotiate and control information ethically to meet organizational needs.
  2. Understand how to use and acquire information in an ethically sensitive manner.
  3. Synthesize various ethical theories and design a corporate code of ethics.
  • Be effective team members in a virtual environment.
  1. Demonstrate the ability to work together in a supportive and effective manner.
  • Be an effective leader who influences people towards the attainment of organizational goals.
  1. Recommend actions for leader effectiveness in a scenario case and apply a theory or framework to propose and defend their recommendations.
  2. Identify various leadership styles and their relative effectiveness, along with real-life examples.
  3. Evaluate, in a case setting, the processes through which goals are set and accomplished in organizations.

Bachelor of science in nursing to doctor of nursing practice (BSN-DNP) and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

At the completion of the program, the greaduate will be able to:

  • Use disciplined reasoning, science-based theories, and concepts from sciences and humanities to:
  1. Determine the nature and significance of health and health care delivery phenomena.
  2. Describe actions and advance strategies to improve healthcare delivery, to diverse populations.
  3. Develop, deliver, and evaluate theory-based health care.
  4. Analyze nursing history to expand thinking and provide a sense of professional heritage and identity
  • Demonstrate organizational and systems leadership that:
  1. Emphasizes clinical practice.
  2. Continually improves health outcomes.
  3. Ensures patient safety.          
  •   Use analytical methods, evidence, and nursing science to:   
  1. Critically appraise existing literature to identify and evaluate best practices and practice guidelines.
  2. Facilitate the evaluation of systems of care in order to improve patient outcomes.
  3. Serve as a practice specialist/consultant in collaborative knowledge generating research.
  4. Disseminate results through translational scholarship.
  • Demonstrate proficiency and provide leadership for the integration of information systems/technology to:
  1. Support, monitor, and improve patient care, healthcare systems, clinical decision-making, nurse-sensitive outcomes, and academic settings.
  2. Support quality improvement and patient safety.
  • Assume a leadership role in advocacy and health care policy development.
  • Establish, participate, and lead interprofessional collaborations for improving patient, population, and systems outcomes.
  • Develop, implement, and evaluate practice and healthcare delivery models for the purpose of quality improvement and improved patient outcomes considering                   
  1. Safety and quality.
  2. Epidemiological, bio-statistical, environmental, and other appropriate scientific data.
  3. Culturally appropriate care.
  4. Values based professional practice and behaviors.
  5. Economies of care, business principles and health policy related to individual, aggregate, and population health.
  • Ensure accountability for advanced practice based on refined assessment skills, advanced communication skills, biophysical. genetic, genomic, psychosocial, sociopopolitical, economic, ethical, and cultural principles.
  • Practice and provide services for populations with in the area of advanced nursing specialization.
 

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Upon successful completion of the PhD program, the PhD graduate will:

The purpose of the PhD program is to prepare nurse scholars/scientists for roles in research, teaching, and service. The program prepares graduates who will contribute to the body of nursing knowledge, educate the next generation, and assume collaborative leadership roles in shaping health policy, improving health, and reducing disparity.

The goals of the program are to prepare graduates who will:

  1. Rigorously test, generate, and extend knowledge to inform nursing science, practice, and policy.
  2. Contribute to the development of knowledge and interventions to address health disparity and promote or improve health.
  3. Assume collaborative leadership roles in academia, health organizations, research teams, and scholarly networks.
  4. Demonstrate expertise within an area of study that incorporates nursing and trans disciplinary perspectives.

School of Nursing Academic Progression Standards

BSN-DNP/DNP

  1. An overall academic grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 in all work attempted in the DNP Program.
  2. A student may earn only one C grade in a nursing course. A second C in a nursing course will result in dismissal from the program. A grade of D or F in any course results in dismissal from the program.
  3. Maintain a 3.0 GPA. A student who falls below the 3.0 GPA on nine or more credit hours has one semester to bring up the GPA to the 3.0 requirement.
  4. Only one nursing course may be repeated, and only one time.
  5. All required courses must be taken for letter grades (A, B, C).

PhD

  1. Nursing course are taken in the sequence specified in the School of Nursing PhD Progression Plan.  All prerequisites from preceding semesters must be completed prior to registration for new courses.
  2. Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to progress in the program and must achieve an overall academic GPA of 3.0 in all coursework applied to the PhD degree.
  3. Students may carry forward one C grade in any course to be applied to the PhD degree. A second C will result in dismissal from the program.
  4. Students with a grade of D or F in any course will be dismissed from the program.
  5. The grade of "I" is given when the instructor believes that the coursework is unavoidably incomplete or that a supplementary examination is justifiable.  Resolution of the grade of "I" will occur in the semester following its issuance and before any graduate degree can be awarded.  If the "I" grade is not removed within the following semester, the grade of "I" is converted to an "F" (failure).  When an "I" grade is replaced, the grade point average is recalculated on the basis of the new grade.

Courses

NSG 501. Advanced Practice Role Seminar. 2 Hours.

PR: Senior status or enrolled in RN to BSN/MSN program. Exploration, analysis, and evaluation of the role of the advanced practice nurse as guided by concepts, theories, and research.

NSG 522. Culture and Health. 3 Hours.

Healthcare is encountering increasing cultural diversity. By identifying cultural behaviors, beliefs, and meaning of health in diverse cultural contexts, students will become more culturally proficient in delivering care.

NSG 593A-L. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

NSG 610. Leadership in Health Care. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: NSG 622 and NSG 623. Critical analysis of leadership frameworks, values and beliefs, and application of skills in the practice setting.

NSG 611. System Based Decision Making. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 616. Decision making grounded in an understanding of the organization as an open living system.

NSG 612. Leading Health System Change. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 610 and NSG 611. Developing system-based change management critical to advanced nursing in various settings, including selection training, and support of effective teams and workgroups.

NSG 613. Managing Health Care Resources. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 622 and NSG 623. Management of financial and human resources to promote professional practice and organizational growth within organizational financial constraints.

NSG 614. Health Care Informatics. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 627. Explore technologies to improve health care practices and learn to utilize technology for outcomes management.

NSG 615. Program Planning/Evaluation. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 613. Health care program planning, strategies for program implementation, and program evaluation techniques.

NSG 616. Role Seminar for Leadership MSN. 2 Hours.

Exploration, analysis, and evaluation of the role of the master’s prepared nurse in leadership positions as guided by concepts, theories, and research.

NSG 617. Leadership Practicum 1. 3 Hours.

Supervised practicum designed to apply healthcare leadership principles to practice. Students participate in nursing leadership and administrative activities in a selected healthcare setting.

NSG 618. Leadership Practicum 2. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 617. Supervised practicum designed to build on initial application of healthcare leadership principles. Students participate in leadership and administrative activities in a selected health care setting.

NSG 622. Theory and Disciplined Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the theoretical foundations of the discipline of nursing as a basis for applying critical thinking skills to the development of a conceptual framework for nursing.

NSG 623. Concepts of Advanced Nursing. 2 Hours.

PR or Conc: NSG 622. Exploration, analysis, and evaluation of concepts, theories, and research guiding the advanced practice of nursing. Learning activities emphasize advanced practice role.

NSG 626. Lifespan Health Promotion. 2 Hours.

An in-depth study of theoretical foundations, epidemiological principles, and advance practice strategies for the promotion of health and prevention of disease across the life-span.

NSG 627. Research and Systematic Analysis. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 622. An overview of research methods, evidence and epidemiological and statistical measures used in advanced practice nursing.

NSG 628. Health Policy, Finance, Ethics. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 622. Study of how health policy, the organization and financing of health care, and ethical principles shape professional practice.

NSG 629. Advanced Practice/Families. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 622 and NSG 623 and NSG 626 and NSG 627. Exploration and analysis of family theories, assessments, and interventions applicable to the advanced practice of nursing.

NSG 654. Neonatal Pathophysiology. 4 Hours.

An introduction to the scientific foundations underlying processes contributing to health/illness states in neonates. Principles from genetics, embryology, and developmental physiology lay the foundation for subsequent courses in assessment, diagnosis and management.

NSG 655. Neonatal health Promotion. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 622. Review of practices and services that contribute to healthy outcomes for sick and well neonates with focus on health promotion, disease prevention, and maintenance of function in the context of critical care and primary care.

NSG 656. Current Issues in Aging. 2 Hours.

An overview of contemporary gerontology that offers a multidisciplinary approach to providing services to older people in the United States.

NSG 657. Advanced Assessment of Older Adults. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 624. Preparation for the conduct of advanced health assessment of older adults. Diagnostic reasoning is emphasized as the student collects and analyzes data obtained from the patient history, physical examination, and diagnostic procedures.

NSG 658. Geriatric Primary Care 1. 2,3 Hours.

PR: NSG 631 and NSG 657. Study of constellation of symptoms in the older adult that may be manifestations of other health problems.

NSG 659. Geriatric Primary Care 2. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 657 and NSG 658. Study of common diseases and disorders seen in the older adult. An integration of advanced practice skills and role competencies in the care of older individuals and their families is emphasized.

NSG 660. Women's Reproductive Health. 2 Hours.

PR: Graduate status or permission. This course focuses on fertility control, reproductive health, menopause, and health promotion activities for women.

NSG 663. Neonatal Assessment/Care 1. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 622 and NSG 623 and NSG 654 and PR or CONC: NSG 655. Preparation for conducting advanced assessment of neonates/young infants. Diagnostic reasoning is emphasized through collecting and analyzing data obtained from patient history, physical examination, and diagnostic procedures.

NSG 664. Neonatal Care 2. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 663 and NSG 631. This course focuses on the management of common problems and conditions in neonates.

NSG 665. Neonatal Practicum 1. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 631 and PR or CONC: NSG 664. This supervised practicum is designed to facilitate the student's competency in the delivery of care to infant populations.

NSG 666. Neonatal Practicum 2. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 665. This supervised practicum is designed to facilitate the student's competency in the delivery of care to infant populations.

NSG 670. Curriculum in Nursing. 3 Hours.

A review of contemporary theory-based determinants of curriculum development in nursing, including analysis and evaluation of curricula for nursing education.

NSG 671. Clinical Practicum-Educators. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 635. Implementation of theory-based advanced nursing practice in an area of student's clinical interest/expertise. Student develops the advanced practice role with a select population of clients and families.

NSG 672. Education Practicum. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 674. Guided teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced faculty member that allows the student to function in the role of nurse educator in classroom and clinical settings.

NSG 674. Teaching in Nursing. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 670. A general methods course involving the principles of instruction in didactic and clinical nursing education including analysis of course planning, teaching methods, and evaluation of student outcomes.

NSG 675. Geriatric Practicum 1. 2-5 Hours.

PR: NSG 657 and NSG 658 and Co-Req: NSG 659. Supervised practicum focusing on developing and implementing advanced practice knowledge and skills essential to the role of geriatric nurse practitioner. Students engage in delivering evidence-based care with older adults.

NSG 676. Geriatric Practicum 2. 4-5 Hours.

PR: NSG 675. Supervised practicum that focuses on evidence-based advanced practice in a variety of settings. The students, with supervision, will manage health care of geriatric clients and their families and participate on interdisciplinary teams.

NSG 683. Primary Care: Women and Girls 1. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 622, NSG 623, NSG 624, NSG 626, NSG 631 and NSG 632. Introduction to the domains and competencies of the advanced practice nursing role that are fundamental to primary health care of women and girls.

NSG 684. Primary Care: Women and Girls 2. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 683. Further development of the domains and competencies of the advanced practice nursing role introduced in NSG 683 that are fundamental to primary health care of the rural family unit.

NSG 685. Clinical Scholarship. 1 Hour.

Co-Req: NSG 635 (For FNP track) or NSG 645 (For PNP track). Knowledge dissemination within the advanced practice role using disciplined reasoning and systematic inquiry to examine and incorporate evidence-based strategies in the caring/healing process.

NSG 686. WHNP Practicum 1. 2-5 Hours.

PR or CONC: NSG 684. Supervised practicum designed to apply theory- and evidence- based advanced practice nursing. Students develop the advanced practice role as they manage health care and participate in service learning.

NSG 687. WHNP Practicum 2. 4-5 Hours.

PR: NSG 686. Supervised practicum that builds upon NSG 686 and focuses on the application of theory-and-evidence-based advanced nursing practice. With supervision, students manage health care and participate on interdisciplinary teams.

NSG 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

NSG 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

NSG 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

NSG 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation guided by a student-graduate faculty contact based on the course objectives and culminating in a written product. (Grading will be S/U.).

NSG 701. Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 706. Examination of the relationship between pharmacologic principles and the selection of pharmacologic agents in altered health states across the lifespan. This course lays the foundation of subsequent courses in diagnosis, management, and therapeutic interventions.

NSG 702. Population Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

In-depth study and analysis of clinical prevention and population health for individuals, aggregates, and populations utilizing advanced nursing practice strategies for the promotion of health and prevention of disease across the lifespan.

NSG 703. Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

Elaboration and integration of theories from nursing, the sciences, and the humanities to build a foundation for the highest level of nursing practice.

NSG 704. Health Care Leadership. 3 Hours.

Critical analysis of leadership in an organizational setting, with development of skills needed to enact the leadership role.

NSG 705. Advanced Lifespan Assessment: FNP Focus. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 706. The focus of this course is the advanced health assessment of individuals across the lifespan. Skilled interviewing and clinical reasoning are emphasized as students collect and analyze data from the patient history, physical examination, and diagnostic procedures.

NSG 706. Advanced Pathophysiology. 3 Hours.

Theoretical basis of pathophysiological changes in acute and chronic illnesses confronted in primary care across the lifespan is presented. The course serves as the foundation for clinical assessment, decision making, and management.

NSG 707. Evidence Based Practice Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 724. This course provides an overview of research methods, evidence, and epidemiologic measures for understanding the translation of research into practice and the design of interventions to promote change in a variety of settings.

NSG 708. Role Seminar for Advanced Practice. 2 Hours.

Exploration, analysis, and evaluation of the role of the advanced practice nurse as guided by concepts, theories, and research.

NSG 709. Health Care Informatics. 3 Hours.

Explore information technologies used in acute and outpatient health settings and describe methods of utilization of technology for practice improvement and patient outcomes management.

NSG 710. Health Care Issues, Policy, and Ethics. 3 Hours.

A foundation for leadership in health policy development, implementation, and evaluation, with a focus on advocacy for nursing, leadership, ethics, finance, and policy/program implementation.

NSG 711. Health Care Focus. 3 Hours.

Provides for the development of knowledge and skills relative to the state of the science in a particular area of clinical practice.

NSG 712. Primary Care of Families 1. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 701 and NSG 702 and NSG 705 and NSG 707 and NSG 708. An introduction to the knowledge and skills basic to the health maintenance, diagnosis, treatment, evaluation, and revision of care of individuals as members of family units in the primary care setting.

NSG 713. Doctor of Nursing Practice Role Application. 1 Hour.

PR or CONC: NSG 742. Integration of Doctor of Nursing practice role competencies at the highest level of nursing practive.

NSG 714. Primary Care of Families 2. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 712. Further acquisition of knowledge and skills basic to the health maintenance, diagnosis, treatment, evaluation, and revision of care of individuals as members of family units in the primary care setting. The change in course hours reflects change in content.

NSG 717. Organization and Leadership. 3 Hours.

Provides a foundation for developing organizational and systems leadership skills critical to clinical care and health outcomes. Knowledge will help students to promote patient safety and excellence in health care organizations.

NSG 719. Health Care Policy. 3 Hours.

Provides a foundation for influencing, developing, implementing, and evaluating health care policies and legislation pertinent to issues in health care such as ethics, safety, costs, access, and quality.

NSG 720. Family Practicum 1. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 712 and NSG 714. Supervised practicum designed to facilitate the student's competency at the advanced practice level in the delivery of primary health care across the lifespan.

NSG 721. Family Practicum 2. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 720. Supervised practicum that builds upon Family Practicum 1 and applies theory and evidence to the advanced practice of nursing. Further role and competency development at the advanced practice level of lifespan primary health care.

NSG 724. Health Research Statistics 1. 3 Hours.

This course provides development of statistical knowledge and skills needed for quantitative health research. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, chi square and regression techniques.

NSG 725. Health Research Statistics 2. 3 Hours.

This course continues the development of statistical knowledge and skills needed for quantitative health research using SPSS, including nonparametric testing, advanced regression topics and diagnostics, ANCOVA, SPSS syntax, classification, and factor, survival and power analyses.

NSG 727. Contemporary Nursing Science. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 728 and PR or CONC: NSG 729. Focus is on an analysis of the state of the science for a phenomenon for study. Emphasis is placed on the application of the particular phenomenon to a population of interest.

NSG 728. Nursing Science Theory/Philosophy. 4 Hours.

This course builds on philosophical basis of nursing. Discovery and verification of scientific knowledge are addressed by focusing on theory development. Methodologies include concept analysis and evaluation of middle-range theories of nursing and related sciences.

NSG 729. Quantitative Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: (NSG 724 and NSG 725) with a minimum grade of B-. Quantitative methods and measurement relevant to conducting research in nursing are studied.

NSG 730. Principles of Measurement. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 727 and NSG 728. The role of measurement in nursing research is studied. Measurement in the areas of attitudes, personality, competence, development, and group qualities is emphasized. Instrument development and reliability/ validity issues are also discussed.

NSG 731. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 728. An exploration of the philosophical foundation and methods of qualitative inquiry. Research designs, ethical issues, rigor, integrity, data collection, interpretation, and representation are studied in depth.

NSG 732. Seminar in Nursing Scholarship. 2 Hours.

PR: Admission to the PhD program. Exploration of the dimensions of scholarship in preparation for future roles as nurse scholars/scientists.

NSG 733. Research Grant Development. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 781. Analysis of the grant-writing process, including current federal application formats, provides students with the background to complete a submittable grant proposal in their own area of research.

NSG 734. Use of Data. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 729. This course focuses on use of the following data bases: clinical, financial, health services, nursing, local, state, and national. The uses of existing data in clinical and policy decisions and in research will be explored.

NSG 735. Principles: Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines the research base of educational strategies in nursing education in classroom and clinical settings. The course also examines external determinants on nursing curriculum, accreditation issues, and evaluation of nursing programs.

NSG 736. Advanced Health Policy and Ethics. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 704, NSG 724, NSG 725, NSG 728, NSG 732, and NSG 735. Examination of ethical issues of research and current health policy.

NSG 737. Leadership. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 734. Through exploration of contemporary leadership theory and application to self, an authentic personal leadership style will be developed to enable the student to enact a leadership role in health care and/or education.

NSG 738. Issues in Nursing Scholarship. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 729, NSG 731, and NSG 737. Seminar focused on broad issues of ethics in the conduct of research and role acquisition of nurse scientist in academic, clinical, and health policy settings.

NSG 745. Clinical Immersion. 1-8 Hours.

PR: NSG 711. Provides for the mastery of clinical skills relative to the state of the science in a particular area of clinical practice.

NSG 760. DNP Project Proposal. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 721 or NSG 773. Develop a scholarly initiative to improve practice system, or patient outcomes.

NSG 761. Clinical Project 1. 1 Hour.

PR: NSG 715 and NSG 716. Identifies a practice problem and connects the problem to existing knowledge and science.

NSG 762. Clinical Project 2. 1 Hour.

PR: NSG 761 and NSG 717 and NSG 718. Students design an initiative to address the practice problem identified in NSG 761 using the appropriate research methods and a variety of scientific principles.

NSG 763. DNP Project. 1-6 Hours.

PR or CONC: NSG 760. Implementation of a capstone project using leadership skills to create and evaluate change relative to a practice problem. Analysis of the relationship of the project to practice and policy.

NSG 767. Advanced Lifespan Assessment: PNP Focus. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 706. Advanced health assessment of individuals across the lifespan with focus on pediatric populations. Skilled interviewing and clinical reasoning are emphasized as students collect and analyze data from the patient history, physical examination and diagnostic procedures.

NSG 768. Prospectus Development. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised experiences in planning the dissertation research project, developing the chapters for the prospectus, and preparing the proposal document for review by committee members.

NSG 769. Faculty Career Development. 1 Hour.

Supervised experiences in searching for available positions, preparing and submitting application materials, participating in campus interviews, and planning a successful future career.

NSG 770. Pediatric Primary Care 1. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 701 and NSG 702 and NSG 705 and NSG 707 and NSG 708. An introduction to the knowledge and skills basic to the health maintenance, diagnosis, treatment, evaluation and revision of care of children in the primary care setting.

NSG 771. Pediatric Primary Care 2. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 770. Further acquisition of knowledge and skills central to the assessment of health status, diagnosis, treatment and evaluation of children in the primary care setting.

NSG 772. Pediatric Practicum 1. 5 Hours.

PR or CONC: NSG 771. Supervised practicum designed to facilitate the student's competency in the delivery of primary health care to children.

NSG 773. Pediatric Practicum 2. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 772. Supervised practicum that builds on NSG 772 [Pediatric Practicum 1] and applies theory and evidence to the advanced practice of nursing. Further role and competency development at the advanced practice level for the delivery of primary health care to pediatric populations.

NSG 781. Research Mentorship. 1-3 Hours.

PR: NSG 729 and NSG 731. In this guided practicum, the student's research skills are developed and cultivated through participation in the mentorship process with an experienced researcher (the chairperson or his/her designee).

NSG 783. Dissertation Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: NSG 729 and NSG 731. This seminar provides an opportunity for continued knowledge synthesis related to the selected topic of research. Students will participate in proposal presentation and critique. The expectation is a National Research Service Award Predoctoral Fellowship Application.

NSG 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

NSG 792. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

NSG 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

NSG 794. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

NSG 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

NSG 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

NSG 797. Research. 1-9 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading will be S/U.).

NSG 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

NSG 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.


Faculty

Professors

  • K. Joy Buck - PhD (University of Virginia)
  • Susan H. McCrone - PhD (University of Utah)

Associate Professors

  • Pamela Deiriggi - PhD (University of Texas)
    Coordinator PNP Track
  • Laurie Theeke - PhD (West Virginia University)

Assistant Professors

  • Roger Carpenter - PhD (West Virginia University)
  • Jennifer Mallow - PhD (West Virginia University)
  • Catherine Nolan - EdD (West Virginia University)
  • Aletha Rowlands - PhD (University of Virginia)
  • Suzy Walter - PhD (West Virginia University)

Clinical Professor

  • Marilyn Smith - PhD (University of Tennessee)

Clinical Associate Professor

  • Emily Brinker Barnes - DNP (West Virginia University)

Clinical Assistant Professors

  • Kendra Barker - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Lori Constantine - DNP (West Virginia University)
  • Sanda Cotton - DNP (West Virginia University)
  • Daniel J. Defeo - M.S.N. (West Virginia University)
  • Elizabeth A. Minchau - M.S.N. (University of Pittsburgh)
  • Trisha Petitte - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Susan Pinto - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Billie Vance - MSN (West Virginia University)

Teaching Assistant Professor

  • Tina Antill-Keener - PhD (West Virginia University)
  • Diana L. McCarty - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Rebecca Smeltzer - DNP (Case Western Reserve University)

Senior Lecturer

  • Michelle Borland - DNP (Walden University)
  • Dana Friend - MPH (West Virginia University)
  • Stacy Huber - MSN (Waynesburg College)
  • Rebecca Kromar - ND (Case Western Reserve University)
  • Kathy Linkous - MSN (Bellarmine College)
  • Patricia Joyce Maramba - DNP (West Virginia University)
  • Terri L. Marcischak - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Amy Miner - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Christine Mott - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Tonya Payerchin - MSN (Waynesburg University)
  • Stacey Pierce - JD (Marshall University)
  • Angel Smothers - DNP (West Virginia University)
  • Joanne E. Watson - MSN (University of Virginia)

Lecturers

  • Kimberly Adams - MSN (Waynesburg University)
  • Amy Ankrom - MSN (University of Pittsburgh)
  • Christy Barnhart - MSN (Waynesburg University)
  • Debbie Bellisario - BSN (West Virginia University)
  • Pearl Bingham - MSN (Norwich University)
  • Laurie Cain - MA (West Virginia University)
  • Gina Greathouse - MSN (University of North Carolina)
  • Jessica Matthews - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Elizabeth McCarty - MSN (Excelsior College)
  • Danille McGinnis - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Susan McKinrick - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Christine Miser - MSN (West Virginia Wesleyan College)
  • Trisha Petitte - M.S.N. (West Virginia University)
  • Kevin Smith - MSN (Waynesburg College)
  • Kara Terhune - M.S.N. (Wilkes University)
  • Amber Walker - MSN (Marshall University)
  • Kimberly Wallace - BSN (West Virginia University)
  • Ashley Wilson - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Stephanie Young - MSN (Gonzaga University)

Adjunct Lecturer

  • Lois Harder - PhD (Purdue University)
  • David Keefover - MSN (Liberty University)
  • Marian Longstreth - BSN (Waynesburg University)
  • Ealine Taylor - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Kara Terhune - MSN (Wilkes University)
  • Kayla Watson - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Christopher Waybright - BSN (West Virginia University)
  • Heather Wright - MSN (West Virginia University)

Charleston Division- Clinical Assistant Professor

  • Laure Marino - DNP (The George Washington University)

Charleston Division-Teaching Assistant Professor

  • Theresa Cowan - DHEd (A.T. Still University of Osteopathic Medicine and Health Professions)
  • Evelyn Martin - DNP (West Virginia University)
  • Teresa Ritchie - DNP (West Virginia University)

Charleston Division-Senior Lecturer

  • Crystal Sheaves - PhD (West Virginia University)
  • Melanie Whelan - PhD (West Virginia University)

Charleston Division-Lecturer

  • Nancy Atkins - MSN (Bellarmine College)
  • Tracie Boner - MSN (West Virginia University)
  • Barbara Koster - MSN (West Virginia University)

WVU Tech Division-Assistant Professor

  • Peggy Fink - PhD (West Virginia University)

WVU Tech Division-Senior Lecturer

  • Amy Bruce - MSN (Marshall University)
  • Barbara Douglas - MSN (Wright State University)
  • Mindy Harris - MSN (Marshall University)
  • James Messer - MSN (University of Phoenix)
  • Robin Spencer - MSN (Marshall University)
  • Melinda Stoecklin - MSN (Marshall University)

WVU Tech Division-Lecturer

  • Kelly Morton - BSN (West Virginia Tech)
  • Hillary Parcell - MSN (Marshall University)

Dean Emeritus

  • Lorita Jenab - EdD (Columbia University)
  • E. Jane Martin - PhD (University of Pittsburgh)

Professor Emeritus

  • Laurie Badzek - MSN,JD (DePaul University)
  • Susan Coyle - PhD (West Virginia University)
  • June Larrabee - PhD (University of Tennessee)
  • Nan Leslie - Ph.D. (University of Utah)
  • Gaynelle McKinney - MSN,ED (Indiana University)
  • Georgia Narsavage - PhD (University of Pennsylvania)
  • Barbara Nunley - PhD (University of Kentucky)

Associate Professor Emeritus

  • Peggy Burkhardt - PhD (University of Miami)
    Charleston Division
  • Imogene P. Foster - EdD (West Virginia University)
  • Debra Harr - EdD (West Virginia University)
  • Jean Hoff - MPH (University of Pittsburgh)
  • Nancy A. Koontz - MSN (University of Maryland)
  • Barbara Kupchak - PhD (University of Texas)
  • Lois O'Kelley - MSN (Wayne State University)
  • C. Lynn Ostrow - EdD (West Virginia University)
  • Elisabeth Shelton - PhD (Widener University)
  • Jane A. Shrewsbury - MN,ED (University of Pittsburgh)
  • Patricia Simoni - EdD (West Virginia University)

Assistant Professor Emeritus

  • Ann Cleveland - EdD (West Virginia University)
  • Suzanne Gross - PhD (University of Texas)
  • Dorothy Johnson - EdD (West Virginia Universtiy)
  • Kathleen Marsland - MS (University of Colorado)

Administration

Dean

  • Tara F. Hulsey - PhD (University of South Carolina)
    Professor

Assistant Dean for Student and Alumni Affairs

  • Gregory T. Cave - BA (West Virginia University)

Director and Assistant Dean of Business & Finance

  • Karis P. Wolfe - MBA (West Virginia University)

Chair-Department of Adult Health

  • Mary Jane Smith - PhD (University of New York)
    Professor

Chair, Department of Family/Community Health

  • Susan Newfield - PhD (Texas Tech University)
    Associate Professor
  • David Parker - PhD (University of South Carolina)
    Associate Professor

Chair-Charleston Division

  • Alvita Nathaniel - PhD (West Virginia University)
    Professor

Chair-WVU Tech Department

  • Evelyn Klocke - EdD (Marshall University
    Assistant Professor

Director, Undergraduate Programs

  • Kari Sand-Jecklin - EdD (West Virginia University)
    Associate Professor

Director, MSN/DNP Programs

  • Martha Summers - DNP (West Virginia University)
    Clinical Associate Professor

Director, PhD Programs

  • Gina Maiocco - PhD (University of Utah)
    Clinical Associate Professor