Doctor of Philosophy

The purpose of the Ph.D. program is to prepare nurse scholars/scientists for roles in research, teaching, and service. The program prepares graduates who will contribute to the body of nursing knowledge, educate the next generation, and assume collaborative leadership roles in shaping health policy, improving health, and reducing disparity.

The goals of the program are to prepare graduates who will:

  1. Rigorously test, generate, and extend knowledge to inform nursing science, practice, and policy.
  2. Contribute to the development of knowledge and interventions to address health disparity and promote or improve health.
  3. Assume collaborative leadership roles in academia, health organizations, research teams, and scholarly networks.
  4. Demonstrate expertise within an area of study that incorporates nursing and trans disciplinary perspectives.

Visit the School of Nursing website at http://nursing.hsc.wvu.edu/. Call the WVU school of Nursing Office of Student Services at 1-866-WVUNURS or (304) 293-1386. Write to WVU School of Nursing at PO Box 9600, Morgantown, WV 26506-9600

Admission Criteria

  1. Transcript of a nursing degree at the baccalaureate level or higher from a nationally accredited nursing program or equivalent.
  2. Evidence of current license to practice nursing in the United States or home country.
  3. Transcript of master's coursework from an accredited program.
  4. A grade of B or higher in graduate-level statistics and research courses.
  5. Cumulative GPA of 3.25 in master’s degree work.
  6. Examples of scholarly work.  This can be a paper from master's work, a submitted article, or some other professional writing.
  7. Interview to determine congruence between the applicant's career goals and program objectives and between the applicant's research interests and those of the faculty.
  8. Essay describing professional experience, research interests, professional goals, and time management skills.

Note: Admission criteria are subject to change. Please see the School of Nursing website for the most up-to-date criteria at http://nursing.hsc.wvu.edu/.

Application Process

The application process is on a rolling basis. The beginning sequence of courses in the PhD in nursing program starts in the summer semester only. Class size and progression plans may be limited based on available faculty resources and space. Applicants to the PhD in nursing program need to complete the following steps in order to be considered for admission:

  1. Complete two application forms as indicated below and return to the appropriate offices by the deadline
    • Application for Admission to Graduate Studies (available at:http://apply.wvu.edu/)
    • Supplemental Application of Admission to PhD in the School of Nursing and PhD application checklist (available at http://nursing.hsc.wvu.edu/). Students should be certain that all materials are sent to the following:

      WVU School of Nursing, Student Services Office
      P.O. Box 9600
      Morgantown, WV 26506-9600
  2. Request an official transcript of records from each college or university attended. Transcripts and records should be sent directly to the following:

    WVU Health Science Center Office of Admissions
    P.O. Box 9815
    Morgantown, WV 26506-981
     
  3. Send three letters of recommendation directly to the following:

    WVU School of Nursing Student Services Office
    P.O. Box 9600
    Morgantown, WV 26506-9600

    Letters should address the applicant’s expertise in nursing, skills in research and scholarly writing, and likelihood for success in doctoral work. One letter should be from a former professor of the applicant.
     
  4. Submit a current curriculum vitae.
  5. Submit one scholarly essay, describing the applicant’s research interests and career goals.

Degree Requirements

Core Requirements
NSG 704Health Care Leadership3
NSG 727Contemporary Nursing Science3
NSG 728Nursing Science Theory/Philosophy4
NSG 732Seminar in Nursing Scholarship2
NSG 735Principles: Nursing Education3
NSG 736Advanced Health Policy and Ethics3
Cognate/Electives6
Select two 3 credit courses. One course must be an advanced methodology course and at least one of the two courses must be taken outside the School of Nursing
Research
NSG 724Health Research Statistics 13
NSG 725Health Research Statistics 23
NSG 731Qualitative Research Methods3
NSG 729Quantitative Methods3
NSG 781 Research Mentorship3
NSG 733Research Grant Development2
NSG 734Use of Data3
NSG 795Independent Study1
NSG 783 Dissertation Seminar1
NSG 797Research9
Qualifying Examination 1
Journal Club 2
Scholarly Events 3
Total Hours55
1

 Successfully complete the qualifying examination prior to beginning the dissertation.

2

 Participate in a monthly virtual journal club during the fall and spring semesters.

3

 Attend 2 in-person scholarly events (2 days each fall and spring semester) throughout the program.

 Academic Progression Standards

  • Nursing course are taken in the sequence specified in the School of Nursing PhD Progression Plan.  All prerequisites from preceding semesters must be completed prior to registration for new courses.
  • Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to progress in the program and much achieve an overall academic GPA of 3.0 in all coursework to be applied toward the PhD degree.
  • Students may carry forward one C grade in any course to be applied toward the PhD degree.  A second C will result in dismissal from the program.
  • Students with a grade of D or F in any course will be dismissed from the program.
  • The grade of "I" is given when the instructor believes that the coursework is unavoidably incomplete or that a supplementary examination is justifiable.  Resolution of the grade of "I" will occur in the semester following its issuance and before any graduate degree can be awarded.  If the "I" grade is not removed within the following semester, the grade of "I" is treated and "F" (failure).  When an "I" grade is replaced, the grade point average is recalculated on the basis of the new grade.

 Suggested Plan of Study

Students are required to be on campus for the six-week Summer sessions, once in the Fall for two days, and once in the Spring for two days.  During residency, students are provided with an opportunity to participate with nurse researchers and peers in the ongoing development of a scholarly community.

First SemesterHours
NSG 7284
NSG 7322
 6
Second SemesterHours
NSG 7243
NSG 7353
 6
Third SemesterHours
NSG 7043
NSG 7253
 6
Fourth SemesterHours
NSG 7273
NSG 7293
 6
Fifth SemesterHours
NSG 7313
Cognate3
 6
Sixth SemesterHours
NSG 7811
Cognate3
NSG 7343
 7
Seventh SemesterHours
NSG 7332
NSG 7811
NSG 7363
 6
Eighth SemesterHours
NSG 7951
NSG 7811
 2
Ninth SemesterHours
NSG 7831
NSG 7979
 10
Total credit hours: 55

Major Learning Goals

Doctor of Philosophy

The PhD in Nursing at WVU is a part-time blended program composed of on-campus classroom and distance learning components.  Three years of coursework, delivered online during Fall and Spring and in a blended format with limited time on campus during Summer, are followed by a qualifying examination.  Students then complete the research and dissertation phase, culminating in a written and oral dissertation defense.  The purpose of the PhD program is to educate nurse scholar-scientists for roles in research, teaching, and service.  The program prepares graduates who will contribute to the body of nursing knowledge; educate the next generation; and assume collaborative leadership roles in shaping health policy, improving health, and reducing disparity.  The goals of the program are to:

  • Rigorously test, generate, and extend knowledge to inform nursing science, practice, and policy.
  • Contribute to the development of knowledge and interventions to address health disparity and promote or improve health.
  • Assume collaborative leadership roles in academia, healthcare organizations, research teams, and scholarly networks.
  • Demonstrate expertise within an area of study that incorporates nursing and transdisciplinary perspectives.

Courses

NSG 501. Advanced Practice Role Seminar. 2 Hours.

PR: Senior status or enrolled in RN to BSN/MSN program. Exploration, analysis, and evaluation of the role of the advanced practice nurse as guided by concepts, theories, and research.

NSG 522. Culture and Health. 3 Hours.

Healthcare is encountering increasing cultural diversity. By identifying cultural behaviors, beliefs, and meaning of health in diverse cultural contexts, students will become more culturally proficient in delivering care.

NSG 593A-L. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

NSG 610. Leadership in Health Care. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: NSG 622 and NSG 623. Critical analysis of leadership frameworks, values and beliefs, and application of skills in the practice setting.

NSG 611. System Based Decision Making. 2 Hours.

PR or CONC: NSG 622 and NSG 623. Decision making grounded in an understanding of the organization as an open living system.

NSG 612. Leading Health System Change. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 610 and NSG 611. Developing system-based change management critical to advanced nursing in various settings, including selection training, and support of effective teams and workgroups.

NSG 613. Managing Health Care Resources. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 622 and NSG 623. Management of financial and human resources to promote professional practice and organizational growth within organizational financial constraints.

NSG 614. Health Care Informatics. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 627. Explore technologies to improve health care practices and learn to utilize technology for outcomes management.

NSG 615. Program Planning/Evaluation. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 613. Health care program planning, strategies for program implementation, and program evaluation techniques.

NSG 617. Leadership Practicum 1. 2-5 Hours.

PR or CONC: NSG 615. Supervised practicum designed to apply healthcare leadership principles to practice. Students participate in nursing leadership and administrative activities in a selected healthcare setting.

NSG 618. Leadership Practicum 2. 2-5 Hours.

PR: NSG 617. Supervised practicum designed to build on initial application of healthcare leadership principles. Students participate in leadership and administrative activities in a selected health care setting.

NSG 622. Theory and Disciplined Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the theoretical foundations of the discipline of nursing as a basis for applying critical thinking skills to the development of a conceptual framework for nursing.

NSG 623. Concepts of Advanced Nursing. 2 Hours.

PR or Conc: NSG 622. Exploration, analysis, and evaluation of concepts, theories, and research guiding the advanced practice of nursing. Learning activities emphasize advanced practice role.

NSG 626. Lifespan Health Promotion. 2 Hours.

An in-depth study of theoretical foundations, epidemiological principles, and advance practice strategies for the promotion of health and prevention of disease across the life-span.

NSG 627. Research and Systematic Analysis. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 622. An overview of research methods, evidence and epidemiological and statistical measures used in advanced practice nursing.

NSG 628. Health Policy, Finance, Ethics. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 622. Study of how health policy, the organization and financing of health care, and ethical principles shape professional practice.

NSG 629. Advanced Practice/Families. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 622 and NSG 623 and NSG 626 and NSG 627. Exploration and analysis of family theories, assessments, and interventions applicable to the advanced practice of nursing.

NSG 634. Primary Care: Rural Families 2. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 633. Further development of the domains and competencies of the advanced practice nursing role introduced in NSG 633 that are fundamental to primary health care of the rural family unit.

NSG 635. Rural Family Health Practicum 1. 2-5 Hours.

PR or Conc: NSG 634. Supervised practicum designed to apply theory- and evidence-based advanced practice nursing. Students develop the advanced practice role as they manage health care and participate in service learning.

NSG 636. Rural Family Health Practicum 2. 4-5 Hours.

PR: NSG 635. Supervised practicum that builds upon NSG 635 and focuses on the application of theory- and evidence-based advanced nursing practice. With supervision, students manage health care and participate on interdisciplinary terms.

NSG 644. Pediatric Primary Care 2. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 647. Further acquisition of knowledge and skills central to the assessment of health status, diagnosis, treatment and evaluation of children in the primary care setting.

NSG 645. Pediatric Practicum 1. 5 Hours.

PR or CONC: NSG 644. Supervised practicum designed to facilitate the student's competency in the delivery of primary health care to children.

NSG 646. Pediatric Practicum 2. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 645. Supervised practicum designed to advance the student's competency in the delivery of primary health care to children.

NSG 647. Assessment and Pediatric Care 1. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 622 and NSG 623 and NSG 624 and NSG 627. An Introduction to the knowledge and skills basic to the assessment of health status, diagnosis, and evaluation of children in the primary care setting.

NSG 654. Neonatal Pathophysiology. 4 Hours.

An introduction to the scientific foundations underlying processes contributing to health/illness states in neonates. Principles from genetics, embryology, and developmental physiology lay the foundation for subsequent courses in assessment, diagnosis and management.

NSG 655. Neonatal health Promotion. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 622. Review of practices and services that contribute to healthy outcomes for sick and well neonates with focus on health promotion, disease prevention, and maintenance of function in the context of critical care and primary care.

NSG 656. Current Issues in Aging. 2 Hours.

An overview of contemporary gerontology that offers a multidisciplinary approach to providing services to older people in the United States.

NSG 657. Advanced Assessment of Older Adults. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 624. Preparation for the conduct of advanced health assessment of older adults. Diagnostic reasoning is emphasized as the student collects and analyzes data obtained from the patient history, physical examination, and diagnostic procedures.

NSG 658. Geriatric Primary Care 1. 2,3 Hours.

PR: NSG 631 and NSG 657. Study of constellation of symptoms in the older adult that may be manifestations of other health problems.

NSG 659. Geriatric Primary Care 2. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 657 and NSG 658. Study of common diseases and disorders seen in the older adult. An integration of advanced practice skills and role competencies in the care of older individuals and their families is emphasized.

NSG 660. Women's Reproductive Health. 2 Hours.

PR: Graduate status or permission. This course focuses on fertility control, reproductive health, menopause, and health promotion activities for women.

NSG 663. Neonatal Assessment/Care 1. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 622 and NSG 623 and NSG 654 and PR or CONC: NSG 655. Preparation for conducting advanced assessment of neonates/young infants. Diagnostic reasoning is emphasized through collecting and analyzing data obtained from patient history, physical examination, and diagnostic procedures.

NSG 664. Neonatal Care 2. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 663 and NSG 631. This course focuses on the management of common problems and conditions in neonates.

NSG 665. Neonatal Practicum 1. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 631 and PR or CONC: NSG 664. This supervised practicum is designed to facilitate the student's competency in the delivery of care to infant populations.

NSG 666. Neonatal Practicum 2. 5 Hours.

PR: NSG 665. This supervised practicum is designed to facilitate the student's competency in the delivery of care to infant populations.

NSG 670. Curriculum in Nursing. 3 Hours.

A review of contemporary theory-based determinants of curriculum development in nursing, including analysis and evaluation of curricula for nursing education.

NSG 671. Clinical Practicum-Educators. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 635. Implementation of theory-based advanced nursing practice in an area of student's clinical interest/expertise. Student develops the advanced practice role with a select population of clients and families.

NSG 672. Education Practicum. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 674. Guided teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced faculty member that allows the student to function in the role of nurse educator in classroom and clinical settings.

NSG 674. Teaching in Nursing. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 670. A general methods course involving the principles of instruction in didactic and clinical nursing education including analysis of course planning, teaching methods, and evaluation of student outcomes.

NSG 675. Geriatric Practicum 1. 2-5 Hours.

PR: NSG 657 and NSG 658 and Co-Req: NSG 659. Supervised practicum focusing on developing and implementing advanced practice knowledge and skills essential to the role of geriatric nurse practitioner. Students engage in delivering evidence-based care with older adults.

NSG 676. Geriatric Practicum 2. 4-5 Hours.

PR: NSG 675. Supervised practicum that focuses on evidence-based advanced practice in a variety of settings. The students, with supervision, will manage health care of geriatric clients and their families and participate on interdisciplinary teams.

NSG 683. Primary Care: Women and Girls 1. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 622, NSG 623, NSG 624, NSG 626, NSG 631 and NSG 632. Introduction to the domains and competencies of the advanced practice nursing role that are fundamental to primary health care of women and girls.

NSG 684. Primary Care: Women and Girls 2. 4 Hours.

PR: NSG 683. Further development of the domains and competencies of the advanced practice nursing role introduced in NSG 683 that are fundamental to primary health care of the rural family unit.

NSG 685. Clinical Scholarship. 1 Hour.

Co-Req: NSG 635 (For FNP track) or NSG 645 (For PNP track). Knowledge dissemination within the advanced practice role using disciplined reasoning and systematic inquiry to examine and incorporate evidence-based strategies in the caring/healing process.

NSG 686. WHNP Practicum 1. 2-5 Hours.

PR or CONC: NSG 684. Supervised practicum designed to apply theory- and evidence- based advanced practice nursing. Students develop the advanced practice role as they manage health care and participate in service learning.

NSG 687. WHNP Practicum 2. 4-5 Hours.

PR: NSG 686. Supervised practicum that builds upon NSG 686 and focuses on the application of theory-and-evidence-based advanced nursing practice. With supervision, students manage health care and participate on interdisciplinary teams.

NSG 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

NSG 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

NSG 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

NSG 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation guided by a student-graduate faculty contact based on the course objectives and culminating in a written product. (Grading will be S/U.).

NSG 701. Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 706. Examination of the relationship between pharmacologic principles and the selection of pharmacologic agents in altered health states across the lifespan. This course lays the foundation of subsequent courses in diagnosis, management, and therapeutic interventions.

NSG 702. Population Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

In-depth study and analysis of clinical prevention and population health for individuals, aggregates, and populations utilizing advanced nursing practice strategies for the promotion of health and prevention of disease across the lifespan.

NSG 703. Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

Elaboration and integration of theories from nursing, the sciences, and the humanities to build a foundation for the highest level of nursing practice.

NSG 704. Health Care Leadership. 3 Hours.

Critical analysis of leadership in an organizational setting, with development of skills needed to enact the leadership role.

NSG 705. Advanced Lifespan Assessment: FNP Focus. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 706. The focus of this course is the advanced health assessment of individuals across the lifespan. Skilled interviewing and clinical reasoning are emphasized as students collect and analyze data from the patient history, physical examination, and diagnostic procedures.

NSG 706. Advanced Pathophysiology. 3 Hours.

Theoretical basis of pathophysiological changes in acute and chronic illnesses confronted in primary care across the lifespan is presented. The course serves as the foundation for clinical assessment, decision making, and management.

NSG 707. Evidence Based Practice Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 724. This course provides an overview of research methods, evidence, and epidemiologic measures for understanding the translation of research into practice and the design of interventions to promote change in a variety of settings.

NSG 708. Role Seminar for Advanced Practice. 2 Hours.

Exploration, analysis, and evaluation of the role of the advanced practice nurse as guided by concepts, theories, and research.

NSG 709. Health Care Informatics. 3 Hours.

Explore information technologies used in acute and outpatient health settings and describe methods of utilization of technology for practice improvement and patient outcomes management.

NSG 710. Health Policy and Resource Management. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 711. The foundation for leadership in health policy development, implementation, and evaluation, with a focus on advocacy for nursing, social justice, and equity. Financial resource management for nursing leadership and policy/ program implementation.

NSG 711. Health Care Focus. 3 Hours.

Provides for the development of knowledge and skills relative to the state of the science in a particular area of clinical practice.

NSG 712. Primary Care of Families 1. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 701 and NSG 702 and NSG 705 and NSG 707 and NSG 708. An introduction to the knowledge and skills basic to the health maintenance, diagnosis, treatment, evaluation, and revision of care of individuals as members of family units in the primary care setting.

NSG 713. Doctor of Nursing Practice Role Application. 1 Hour.

PR or CONC: NSG 742. Integration of Doctor of Nursing practice role competencies at the highest level of nursing practive.

NSG 717. Organization and Leadership. 3 Hours.

Provides a foundation for developing organizational and systems leadership skills critical to clinical care and health outcomes. Knowledge will help students to promote patient safety and excellence in health care organizations.

NSG 719. Health Care Policy. 3 Hours.

Provides a foundation for influencing, developing, implementing, and evaluating health care policies and legislation pertinent to issues in health care such as ethics, safety, costs, access, and quality.

NSG 724. Health Research Statistics 1. 3 Hours.

This course provides development of statistical knowledge and skills needed for quantitative health research. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, chi square and regression techniques.

NSG 725. Health Research Statistics 2. 3 Hours.

This course continues the development of statistical knowledge and skills needed for quantitative health research using SPSS, including nonparametric testing, advanced regression topics and diagnostics, ANCOVA, SPSS syntax, classification, and factor, survival and power analyses.

NSG 727. Contemporary Nursing Science. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 728 and PR or CONC: NSG 729. Focus is on an analysis of the state of the science for a phenomenon for study. Emphasis is placed on the application of the particular phenomenon to a population of interest.

NSG 728. Nursing Science Theory/Philosophy. 4 Hours.

This course builds on philosophical basis of nursing. Discovery and verification of scientific knowledge are addressed by focusing on theory development. Methodologies include concept analysis and evaluation of middle-range theories of nursing and related sciences.

NSG 729. Quantitative Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: (NSG 724 and NSG 725) with a minimum grade of B-. Quantitative methods and measurement relevant to conducting research in nursing are studied.

NSG 730. Principles of Measurement. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 727 and NSG 728. The role of measurement in nursing research is studied. Measurement in the areas of attitudes, personality, competence, development, and group qualities is emphasized. Instrument development and reliability/ validity issues are also discussed.

NSG 731. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 728. An exploration of the philosophical foundation and methods of qualitative inquiry. Research designs, ethical issues, rigor, integrity, data collection, interpretation, and representation are studied in depth.

NSG 732. Seminar in Nursing Scholarship. 2 Hours.

PR: Admission to the PhD program. Exploration of the dimensions of scholarship in preparation for future roles as nurse scholars/scientists.

NSG 733. Research Grant Development. 2 Hours.

PR: NSG 781. Analysis of the grant-writing process, including current federal application formats, provides students with the background to complete a submittable grant proposal in their own area of research.

NSG 734. Use of Data. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 729. This course focuses on use of the following data bases: clinical, financial, health services, nursing, local, state, and national. The uses of existing data in clinical and policy decisions and in research will be explored.

NSG 735. Principles: Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines the research base of educational strategies in nursing education in classroom and clinical settings. The course also examines external determinants on nursing curriculum, accreditation issues, and evaluation of nursing programs.

NSG 736. Advanced Health Policy and Ethics. 3 Hours.

PR:NSG 728, NSG 724, NSG 732, NSG 724, NSG 735, NSG 725, and NSG 704. Examination of ethical issues of research and current health policy.

NSG 737. Leadership. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 734. Through exploration of contemporary leadership theory and application to self, an authentic personal leadership style will be developed to enable the student to enact a leadership role in health care and/or education.

NSG 738. Issues in Nursing Scholarship. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 729, NSG 731, and NSG 737. Seminar focused on broad issues of ethics in the conduct of research and role acquisition of nurse scientist in academic, clinical, and health policy settings.

NSG 745. Clinical Immersion. 1-8 Hours.

PR: NSG 711. Provides for the mastery of clinical skills relative to the state of the science in a particular area of clinical practice.

NSG 760. Doctor of Nursing Practice Clinical Project. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 721 or NSG 773. Develop a scholarly initiative to improve practice system, or patient outcomes.

NSG 761. Clinical Project 1. 1 Hour.

PR: NSG 715 and NSG 716. Identifies a practice problem and connects the problem to existing knowledge and science.

NSG 762. Clinical Project 2. 1 Hour.

PR: NSG 761 and NSG 717 and NSG 718. Students design an initiative to address the practice problem identified in NSG 761 using the appropriate research methods and a variety of scientific principles.

NSG 763. Doctor of Nursing Practice Capstone. 1-6 Hours.

PR: NSG 762. Project implementation using leadership skills to create and evaluate change relative to a practice problem. Analyzey. relationship of project to practice and policy.

NSG 767. Advanced Lifespan Assessment: PNP Focus. 3 Hours.

PR: NSG 706. Advanced health assessment of individuals across the lifespan with focus on pediatric populations. Skilled interviewing and clinical reasoning are emphasized as students collect and analyze data from the patient history, physical examination and diagnostic procedures.

NSG 768. Prospectus Development. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised experiences in planning the dissertation research project, developing the chapters for the prospectus, and preparing the proposal document for review by committee members.

NSG 769. Faculty Career Development. 1 Hour.

Supervised experiences in searching for available positions, preparing and submitting application materials, participating in campus interviews, and planning a successful future career.

NSG 781. Research Mentorship. 1-3 Hours.

PR: NSG 729 and NSG 731. In this guided practicum, the student's research skills are developed and cultivated through participation in the mentorship process with an experienced researcher (the chairperson or his/her designee).

NSG 783. Dissertation Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: NSG 729 and NSG 731. This seminar provides an opportunity for continued knowledge synthesis related to the selected topic of research. Students will participate in proposal presentation and critique. The expectation is a National Research Service Award Predoctoral Fellowship Application.

NSG 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

NSG 792. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

NSG 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

NSG 794. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

NSG 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

NSG 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

NSG 797. Research. 1-9 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading will be S/U.).

NSG 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (6978), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

NSG 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.