Psychology

http://psychology.wvu.edu/

Degrees Offered

  • Master of Science
  • Doctor of Philosophy

Doctoral Program Majors

The doctoral degree major areas of study in Behavior Analysis, Behavioral Neuroscience, Clinical & Clinical Child Psychology, and Life-Span Developmental Psychology prepare students for careers in research, teaching, and/or practice.

Program Accreditation

The Clinical Program at West Virginia University is comprised of two major areas of study: Clinical Psychology and Clinical Child Psychology. The Program has been accredited continuously by the American Psychological Association since 1966. In 2012, the Program was re-accredited for a full 7 years, with the next site visit scheduled to occur in 2019. For any questions regarding accreditation of this or any other program, contact the Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation of the American Psychological Association, 750 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002. Phone number: (202) 336-5979. Website: http://www.apa.org/ed/accreditation.

The Behavior Analysis Program at West Virginia University is accredited by the Association for Behavior Analysis International.  In 2014, the Program was re-accredited from 2014-2019.

Admission

Students are admitted only at the beginning of the fall semester. Applications must be completed by the preceding December 1.

Acceptance is based on the following:

  • Adequate academic aptitude at the graduate level as measured by the Graduate Record Examination
  • Achievement in undergraduate coursework with a minimum grade point average of 3.0
  • Personal qualities that predict success in graduate study and as a professional after graduation
  • Adequate preparation in psychology and related fields
  • Fit between the applicant’s interests and the offerings of a department graduate program major area of study

Non-Degree Students

Graduate courses in psychology are designed for regularly admitted degree-seeking psychology students as part of an extensive program of preparing those students for professional careers. Thus, students not admitted into one of the psychology graduate program areas are discouraged from taking graduate courses in psychology. Non-psychology graduate students must obtain the instructor’s permission to enroll in any psychology graduate course.

Master of Science

Students who are accepted into the doctoral (Ph.D.) program in psychology will receive the M.S. degree upon completing the requirements listed below.

Major Requirements

PSYC 511Research Design and Data Analysis 13
PSYC 795Independent Study *6
Research methodology course from the following list or another methodology course approved by the student’s advising committee: 3
Research Design and Data Analysis 2
Single-Subject Research Methods
Multivariate Analysis
Quasi-Experimental Design
Program Evaluation and Intervention
Seminar in Methodology
Electives36
Non-Course Requirements
Thesis Proposal
Thesis Defense Date Declaration Form
Thesis Oral Defense Form
ETD Approval
Application for Graduation
Graduation Certification: Department
Graduation Certification: College
Total Hours48
*

 PSYC 795- A minimum of 6 credits is required

Doctor of Philosophy

Psychology: Behavior Analysis

Major Requirements
Principles of Behavior 3
Experimental Analysis of Behavior
Research Methods9
Research Design and Data Analysis 1 (fulfills dept methods requirement )
Research Design and Data Analysis 2 (fulfills dept methods requirement)
Single-Subject Research Methods
Conceptual Analysis6
Behavior Theory and Philosophy
History and Systems
Verbal Behavior
Basic Behavior Analysis 6
Select two from the following:
Human Behavior
Stimulus Control and Memory
Reinforcement and Punishment
Advanced Experimental Analysis of Behavior
Applied Behavior Analysis6
Applied Behavior Analysis
Select one from the following:
Behavior Analysis Practicum
Advanced Behavior Analysis Practicum
Assessment and Intervention for Severe Behavior
Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis
Ethics3
Ethics in Behavior Analysis
Specialized Elective-one course from below (or another approved by the Behavior Analysis Training Committee) :3
Software Design in Psychology
Biological Aspects of Behavior
Clinical Psychopharmacology
Research:6
Independent Study *
Qualifying Examination
Admission to Doctoral Candidacy
Defense Declaration Form Dissertation
Oral Defense Form
ETD Approval
Application for Graduation
Graduation Certification: Department
Graduation Certification: College
Total Hours42
*

Students are expected to be involved in research throughout your graduate career, and your enrollment in PSYC 795, should reflect this activity. You must complete at least six hours. 

Doctor of Philosophy

Psychology: Behavioral Neuroscience

Major Requirements
Core Behavioral Neuroscience Courses - All of the Following:
PSYC 608Professional Issues - Behavioral Neuroscience1
PSYC 694Seminar *3
PSYC 701Advanced Professional Issues in Psychology1-3
PSYC 650Behavioral Neuroscience Methods3
PSYC 722Biological Aspects of Behavior3
PSYC 724Advanced Neuroscience4
Methodology Courses - Both of the Following
PSYC 511Research Design and Data Analysis 13
PSYC 512Research Design and Data Analysis 23
Advanced Methodology Courses - One of the Following (after 511 & 512) **3
Single-Subject Research Methods
Multivariate Analysis
Program Evaluation and Intervention
Seminar in Methodology
History, Philosophy, and Theory of Psychology - One of the Following:3
Conceptual Issues in Developmental Psychology
History and Systems
Behavior Theory and Philosophy
Or an advanced course on History, Philosophy, or Theory of Psychology in Psychology or another department ( Requires approval by Behavioral Neuroscience Training Committee)
Research - As appropriate:
PSYC 795Independent Study ***6
Required elective courses approved by the Behavioral Neuroscience Training Committee12
Qualifying Examination
Admission to Doctoral Candidacy
Defense Declaration Form Dissertation
Oral Defense Form
ETD Approval
Application for Graduation
Graduation Certification: Department
Graduation Certification: College
Total Hours45
*

Seminar in Behavioral Neuroscience - Students must take this course every semester offered.

**

For Advanced Methodology Courses - Students may also take an advanced course on research design or data analysis in Psychology, Statistics, or another department (requires approval by the Behavioral Neuroscience Training Committee).

***

Independent Study - At least six hours during thesis work, continuous during dissertation work.

Doctor of Philosophy

Psychology: Clinical

Major Requirements
PSYC 511Research Design and Data Analysis 13
PSYC 512Research Design and Data Analysis 23
PSYC 655Research Methods in Clinical Psychology *3
PSYC 721History and Systems3
PSYC 661Behavior Therapy3
PSYC 671Child Behavior Therapy3
PSYC 653Behavioral and Psychological Assessment 13
PSYC 654Behavioral and Psychological Assessment 24
PSYC 531Experimental Analysis of Behavior3
PSYC 652Clinical Interviewing3
PSYC 603Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology1
PSYC 607Ethical and Legal Issues in Psychology3
PSYC 722Biological Aspects of Behavior3
PSYC 651Behavior Pathology3
PSYC 725Social Psychology3
PSYC 745Seminar in Life-Span Development3
Clinical Supervision (taken twice)2
Seminar in Clinical Supervision
Practica and Internship: **18
Clinical Psychology Practicum
Clinical Child Psychology Practicum
PSYC 750Clinical Internship3
Research: ***
PSYC 795Independent Study6
Electives approved by the Clinical Training Committee9
Qualifying Examination
Admission to Doctoral Candidacy
Defense Declaration Form Dissertation
Oral Defense Form
ETD Approval
Application for Graduation
Graduation Certification: Department
Graduation Certification: College
Total Hours85
*

Research Methods in Clinical Psychology counts as the third departmental methods course.

**

Students must complete at least 18 hours of practica (660 Clinical Psychology Practicum or 670 Clinical Child Practicum) and three hours of internship (750 Clinical Internship).  At least two academic years of practica must be through a Quin Curtis Center Clinical Team, and you must have at least two different supervisor/team experiences, each lasting one academic year or twelve month period.

***

Students are expected to be involved in research throughout their graduate career, and their enrollment in PSYC 795 ( Independent Study), should reflect this activity.  Students must complete at least six hours.

Doctor of Philosophy

Psychology: Clinical Child 

Major Requirements
PSYC 511Research Design and Data Analysis 13
PSYC 512Research Design and Data Analysis 23
PSYC 655Research Methods in Clinical Psychology *3
PSYC 721History and Systems3
PSYC 661Behavior Therapy3
PSYC 671Child Behavior Therapy3
PSYC 653Behavioral and Psychological Assessment 13
PSYC 654Behavioral and Psychological Assessment 24
PSYC 531Experimental Analysis of Behavior3
PSYC 652Clinical Interviewing3
PSYC 603Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology1
PSYC 607Ethical and Legal Issues in Psychology3
PSYC 722Biological Aspects of Behavior3
PSYC 651Behavior Pathology3
PSYC 725Social Psychology3
PSYC 745Seminar in Life-Span Development3
Clinical Supervision (taken twice)2
Seminar in Clinical Supervision
Practica and Internship: **18
Clinical Psychology Practicum
Clinical Child Psychology Practicum
PSYC 750Clinical Internship3
Research: ***
PSYC 795Independent Study6
Electives approved by the Clinical Child Training Committee9
Qualifying Examination
Admission to Doctoral Candidacy
Defense Declaration Form Dissertation
Oral Defense Form
ETD Approval
Application for Graduation
Graduation Certification: Department
Graduation Certification: College
Total Hours85
*

Research Methods in Clinical Psychology counts as third departmental methods course.

**

Students must complete at least 18 hours of practica (660 Clinical Psychology Practicum or 670 Clinical Child Practicum) and three hours of internship (750 Clinical Internship).  At least two academic years of practica must be through a Quin Curtis Center Clinical Team, and students must have at least two different supervisor/team experiences, each lasting one academic year or twelve month period.

***

Students are expected to be involved in research throughout their graduate career, and their enrollment in PSYC 795 (Independent Study), should reflect this activity. Students must complete at least six hours.

Doctor of Philosophy

Psychology: Life-Span Development

Major Requirements
PSYC 511Research Design and Data Analysis 13
PSYC 512Research Design and Data Analysis 23
PSYC 545Conceptual Issues in Developmental Psychology3
PSYC 546Methodological Issues in Developmental Psychology3
PSYC 602Professional Issues in Developmental Psychology1-3
PSYC 701Advanced Professional Issues in Psychology1-3
PSYC 541Infant Development3
PSYC 542Child Development3
PSYC 543Adolescent and Young Adult Development3
PSYC 544Adult Development and Aging3
Advanced Methodology Courses (After PSYC 511 & 512)6
You must take two of the following advanced methodology courses. Other advanced methodology courses approved by the Life-Span Developmental Training Committee also may be used to fulfill this requirement
Single-Subject Research Methods
Multivariate Analysis
Program Evaluation and Intervention
Seminar in Methodology *
Research **
PSYC 795Independent Study6
Electives approved by the Life-Span Developmental Training Committee***9
Qualifying Examination
Admission to Doctoral Candidacy
Defense Declaration Form Dissertation
Oral Defense Form
ETD Approval
Application for Graduation
Graduation Certification: Department
Graduation Certification: College
Total Hours47-51
*

Other courses approved by the Life-Span Developmental Training Committee may also be used to fulfill this requirement. PSYC 711 may be repeated for credit when the seminar topic is different.

**

Students are expected to be involved in research throughout their graduate career, and their enrollment in PSYC 795 (Independent Study) should reflect this activity.

***

Usually, electives include at least three credit hours of PSYC 745 (Seminar in Life-Span Development). PSYC 745 may be repeated for credit when topics differ.

Major Learning Goals

psychology

Students graduating with a doctorate in psychology will acquire the following research and communication skills:

  • Students will design and execute empirical research to investigate psychological topics.
  • Students will conduct and interpret statistical analyses.
  • Students will clearly communicate results of empirical research, both orally and in writing.
  • Students will create and deliver professional oral presentations.  
  • Students will demonstrate expert knowledge of their area of emphasis.
  • Students will be conversant with historical, philosophical, and theoretical issues in psychology.
  • Students will abide by the ethical principles of the discipline of psychology. 

Courses

PSYC 511. Research Design and Data Analysis 1. 3 Hours.

Principles of experimental design in psychology including group and single subject methodologies. Topics include: (1) internal and external validity; (2) simple and complex analysis of variance; and (3) reversal and multiple baseline designs.

PSYC 512. Research Design and Data Analysis 2. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 511. Inferential statistics, simple correlation and regression, multiple correlation and regression, partial correlation, analysis of power, and analysis of covariance, analysis of variance of designs with unequal cell sizes.

PSYC 524. Fundamentals of Gerontology. 3 Hours.

An advanced multidisciplinary examination of current research in biological, psychological, and sociological issues of human aging and the ways in which these impinge on the individual to create both problems and new opportunities. (Also listed as BIOL 738.).

PSYC 531. Experimental Analysis of Behavior. 3 Hours.

Research and theory in the psychology of learning. Assessment of traditional and behavior-analytic approaches to the study of positive reinforcement, aversive control, and stimulus control. Includes laboratory work with animals.

PSYC 532. Human Behavior. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 531. Review of the role of basic human operant research in testing the generality of animal-based behavior principles, analyzing phenomena that are specific to humans, and extending behavior analysis to traditional psychological problems.

PSYC 533. Applied Behavior Analysis. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 531. Methodological, empirical, and conceptual issues in the application of basic research in behavior analysis to problems of social significance.

PSYC 541. Infant Development. 3 Hours.

Examination of psychological literature on prenatal and infant development. Topics include physical, cognitive, perceptual, language, and socioemotional development.

PSYC 542. Child Development. 3 Hours.

Examination of psychological literature on child development. Topics include perception, learning, language, problem solving, social cognition, peer and family relationships, gender, moral development, friendship, aggression, and altruism.

PSYC 543. Adolescent and Young Adult Development. 3 Hours.

Examination of the psychological literature in adolescence and young adulthood. Topics include learning, problem solving, social cognition, peer and family relationships, gender, moral development, friendship, aggression, and altruism.

PSYC 544. Adult Development and Aging. 3 Hours.

Examination of psychological literature on adulthood and aging. Topics include health, cognition, family relationships, personality, psychopathology, work, and retirement.

PSYC 545. Conceptual Issues in Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours.

History, philosophies, and theories of psychological development in the major age periods and the life span; conceptual issues such as nature-nurture, sex differences, cultural differences, life events, rigidity-plasticity, continuity-discontinuity, and competence-performance.

PSYC 546. Methodological Issues in Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours.

Methodological issues in psychological research on the major age periods and the life span. Topics include: validity; reliability; age, cohort, and time of measurement; cross-sectional, longitudinal, and mixed designs; data analytic methods; ethical issues.

PSYC 593A-J. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PSYC 593J. Special Topics. 1-6Hr. A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

PSYC 601. Professional Issues in Behavior Analysis. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit.) Survey of professional issues in behavior analysis.

PSYC 602. Professional Issues in Developmental Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit.) Survey of professional issues in developmental psychology. (Grading may be S/U.).

PSYC 603. Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit.) Survey of professional issues in clinical psychology. (Grading may be S/U.).

PSYC 604. Ethical Issues in Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) The ethical standards for psychologists as applied to research and clinical problems.

PSYC 605. Legal Issues in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Review of the major areas in which psychologists interact with the civil and criminal legal systems.

PSYC 606. Seminar on Teaching Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit.) Review and discussion of methods and issues in college teaching of psychology.

PSYC 607. Ethical and Legal Issues in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Surveys the ethical guidelines and major legal issues confronted by psychologists.

PSYC 608. Professional Issues - Behavioral Neuroscience. 1 Hour.

Survey of professional issues in behavioral neuroscience.

PSYC 609. Ethics in Behavior Analysis. 3 Hours.

PSYC 609. Ethics in Behavior Analysis. 3-Hr. Surveys the ethical guidelines and standards for behavior analysts.

PSYC 611. Single-Subject Research Methods. 3 Hours.

PR:PSYC 511 and PSYC 531. Critical evaluation of single-subject designs in basic and applied research. Major topics include single- subject methodology's historical and conceptual bases, its relation to group-statistical methods, and its role in behavioral psychology.

PSYC 612. Multivariate Analysis. 3 Hours.

PR:PSYC 511. Data analysis techniques in psychology with application to typical research problems. Includes simple matrix algebra, discriminant analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and an introduction to factor analysis. (Equiv. to STAT 541.).

PSYC 613. Quasi-Experimental Design. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 511 and PSYC 512. Consideration of the statistical procedures used with quasi-experimental group and single-subject designs.

PSYC 614. Program Evaluation and Intervention. 3 Hours.

Examines the nature, method, and process of evaluative research, especially as it applies to social and behavioral treatment and service delivery programs.

PSYC 615. Software Design in Psychology. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Practical introduction to software development for behavioral research applications including real-time experimental control and data collection, graphical user interfaces, and data analysis; general algorithmic methods; event-driven models. No programming background required.

PSYC 630. Behavior Analysis Practicum. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 533 and consent. Supervised applied behavior analysis experience integrated with a seminar emphasizing group solutions to problems that individuals encounter in students' applied projects. Progress and final project reports are presented and evaluated. (1 hr. sem., 2 hr. practicum.).

PSYC 650. Behavioral Neuroscience Methods. 3 Hours.

An overview of the most common research methods and techniques used in the behavioral neuroscience field.

PSYC 651. Behavior Pathology. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of diagnostic classification, functional analysis, and experimental research in psychopathology of child, adult, and geriatric adjustment problems.

PSYC 652. Clinical Interviewing. 3 Hours.

Clinical interviewing assessment, and interviewing skills acquisition.

PSYC 653. Behavioral and Psychological Assessment 1. 3 Hours.

Conceptual and methodological bases for behavioral assessment; comparison of trait-oriented versus behavioral assessment; design and evaluation of measurement systems, particularly self-report, ratings by others, and direct observation, within the basic framework of generalizability theory.

PSYC 654. Behavioral and Psychological Assessment 2. 4 Hours.

PR: PSYC 653. Evaluation of clinically relevant behavior and environments by means of testing and other methods. Includes test selection, administration, and report writing.

PSYC 655. Research Methods in Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

Fundamental knowledge of research methodology in the science of clinical psychology. Acquisition of skills in research design, evidence-based practice of psychology, scholarly review, and scientific writing.

PSYC 656. Grant Writing in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Essential writing skills for securing extramural funding for research programs in the behavioral sciences.

PSYC 660. Clinical Psychology Practicum. 1-15 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. Supervised practice of psychological techniques in clinics or institutional settings; experience in psychological testing, interviewing, report writing, case presentation, interpretation of tests and supportive counseling.

PSYC 661. Behavior Therapy. 3 Hours.

Reviews the roots and development of behavioral interventions. Applied clinical intervention is stressed in concert with evaluation and research application.

PSYC 670. Clinical Child Psychology Practicum. 1-15 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. Supervised field experience in various aspects of delivering psychological services directly or indirectly to children. Experience in assessment, treatment, program design, administration, and evaluation.

PSYC 671. Child Behavior Therapy. 3 Hours.

Assessment, intervention, and evaluation strategies appropriate for childhood disorders and based on behavior principles.

PSYC 693. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developmentes in the field.

PSYC 694A. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

PSYC 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

PSYC 701. Advanced Professional Issues in Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit.) Discussion of professional issues in psychology relevant to advanced doctoral students. (Grading May be S/U.).

PSYC 711. Seminar in Methodology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Current problems and techniques in research design, data analysis, and research methods.

PSYC 721. History and Systems. 3 Hours.

Study of the history of psychology from its roots in physics, biology, and philosophy. The development of American psychology is emphasized.

PSYC 722. Biological Aspects of Behavior. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Overviews of the areas of psychological investigation that pertain to the relation between biology and psychology, including neuroscience, psychobiological theories of personality and development, neurological and neuropsychological assessment, psychophysiology, and biologically-based treatment strategies, including basic psychopharmacology.

PSYC 723. Psychophysiology. 3 Hours.

PR: 3 hours of physiological psychology or consent. The current state of theory, methods, and findings concerning the association of physiological response systems and psychological states and processes, including biofeedback intervention.

PSYC 724. Advanced Neuroscience. 4 Hours.

PR: PSYC 722 with a minimum grade of B-. In-depth exploration of nervous system anatomy and physiological processes, including the biological mechanisms underlying emotion, motivation, memory, and disease.

PSYC 725. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Survey of current concepts, research, and findings in social psychology. Includes such topics as self and identity, attribution theory, interpersonal perception, social cognition, attitude change, social influence, interpersonal processes, prosocial behavior, aggression, and prejudice.

PSYC 730. Advanced Behavior Analysis Practicum. 1-6 Hours.

PR: PSYC 533 or consent. Supervised applied behavior analysis experience in an approved setting.

PSYC 731. Research Issues in Behavior Analysis. 3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) PR: Consent. Examination of research issues in general psychology from a behavior analytic perspective. Topics vary from year to year.

PSYC 732. Behavior Theory and Philosophy. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 531 or equivalent. Critical consideration of contemporary concepts, theories, and methods of psychology.

PSYC 733. Stimulus Control and Memory. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 531 or consent. Critical review of basic research and theory in discrimination learning, stimulus generalization, and memory.

PSYC 734. Reinforcement and Punishment. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 531. Examination of theories of response acquisition, maintenance, and suppression in the context of recent experimental work with animals and humans.

PSYC 735. Assessment and Intervention for Severe Behavior. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 533. Research and clinical practice in functional behavior assessment, including indirect, descriptive assessment, and functional analysis, and behavior-analytic interventions for severe challenging behavior.

PSYC 736. Advanced Experimental Analysis of Behavior. 3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) PR: PSYC 531. Selected topics and research issues in the experimental analysis of behavior.

PSYC 737. Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis. 3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) PR: PSYC 533. Application of research and theory of behavior analysis to social problems; other selected topics.

PSYC 739. Verbal Behavior. 3 Hours.

PR: PSYC 531 or consent. Examination of current empirical and theoretical issues related to the functional analysis of verbal behavior.

PSYC 740. Practicum in Developmental Psychology. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Provides experience in a wide range of applied settings. Sites are chosen to accommodate exposure to the entire life-span from infancy through old age. Supervising responsibilities are determined by the instructor-in-charge in the agency.

PSYC 745. Seminar in Life-Span Development. 3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Current issues in life-span development or selected periods of the life span.

PSYC 750. Clinical Internship. 1-15 Hours.

Intensive training in clinical assessment, diagnosis, consultation, and/or treatment skills that occur during an internship placement, typicallya at an off-campus training site.

PSYC 751. Integrative Behavioral Psychotherapy. 3 Hours.

Conceptual and practical introduction to basic tenets, concepts, and techniques of major schools of psychotherapy. Reviews psychotherapy integration efforts by analyzing therapy process variables and therapist activities presumably common to many effective forms of therapy.

PSYC 752. Family and Marital Therapy. 3 Hours.

Examines both theoretical and practical aspects of the assessment and treatment of family and marital difficulties.

PSYC 754. Clinical Psychopharmacology. 3 Hours.

Survey of the ways in which psychotropic drugs are used to treat behavioral and psychological disorders.

PSYC 755. Seminar in Clinical Supervision. 1 Hour.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Theoretical foundations and empirical research pertaining to clinical supervision, coupled with experiential training in conducting clinical supervision in applied settings.

PSYC 762A. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762B. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762C. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762D. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762E. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762F. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762G. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762H. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762I. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762J. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762K. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762L. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762M. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762N. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762O. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762P. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762Q. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762R. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762S. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762T. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762U. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762V. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762W. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762X. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762Y. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 762Z. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent) Research and problems in clinical psychology.

PSYC 772. Seminar in Clinical Child Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

(May be repeated for credit with consent.) Current issues and research related to a particular area of clinical psychology involving children.

PSYC 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of psychology. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading may be P/F.).

PSYC 791J. . 1-6 Hours.

PSYC 792A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

PSYC 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

PSYC 794A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

PSYC 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

PSYC 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.


Faculty

Chair

  • Kevin Larkin - Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
    Clinical Health Psychology, Applied Psychophysiology, Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine

Professors

  • Christina Duncan - Ph.D. (Louisiana State University)
    Behavioral Pediatrics, Chronic Illness, Adherence
  • Barry A. Edelstein - Ph.D. (University of Memphis)
    Eberly Family Distinguished Professor of Clinical Psychology. Clinical Gero-psychology, Anxiety and Decision-making in Older Adults
  • Katherine Karraker - Ph.D. (Michigan State University)
    Associate Provost for Graduate Academic Affairs. Adults’ Perceptions of Infants, Infant Social Development
  • Kennon A. Lattal - Ph.D. (University of Alabama)
    Centennial Professor. Experimental Analysis of Behavior, History and Philosophy of Psychology, Human-Pet Interactions
  • Cheryl B. McNeil - Ph.D. (University of Florida)
    Disruptive Behavior Disorders of Children, Child Behavior Therapy, Parent-Child Interactions
  • Daniel W. McNeil - Ph.D. (University of Alabama)
    Eberly Family Professor for Outstanding Public Service. Experimental Psychopathology, Behavioral Dentistry and Behavioral Medicine, Pain and Anxiety
  • Tracy L. Morris - Ph.D. (University of Mississippi)
    Eberly Distinguished Professor of Outstanding Teaching and Associate Dean for Research, Graduate Studies, and Outreach. Developmental Psychopathology, Social Anxiety, Peer Relationships
  • Melanie C. Page - Ph.D. (Arizona State University)
    Assistant Vice President for Creative and Scholarly Activity. Quantitative/Developmental Psychology
  • Michael Perone - Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)
    Associate Dean for Faculty. Positive and Negative Reinforcement, Animal and Human Operant Behavior, Research Methodology
  • JoNell Strough - Ph.D. (University of Utah)
    Life-Span Development, Decision Making, Everyday Problem Solving, Gender Development

Associate Professors

  • Karen G. Anderson - Ph.D. (University of Florida)
    Behavioral Pharmacology, Self-Control and Impulsivity
  • Amy Fiske - Ph.D. (University of Southern California)
    Late Life Depression and Suicide
  • Amy Gentzler - Ph.D. (Kent State University)
    Emotion Regulation and Coping in Childhood, Positive Psychology
  • Amy Herschell - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    Dissemination of Evidence-Based Treatments
  • Elisa Krackow - Ph.D. (Binghamton University-SUNY)
    Adult and Child Testimony, Developmental Psychopathology
  • Aaron Metzger - Ph.D. (University of Rochester)
    Adolescent Social-Cognitive Development, Civic Engagement, Adolescent-Parent Communication
  • Hawley Montgomery-Downs - Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
    Sleep, Sleep Disorders, Developmental Psychobiology
  • Julie Hicks Patrick - Ph.D. (University of Akron)
    Decision Making, Family Processes in Mid- and Late-Life
  • Claire St. Peter - Ph.D. (University of Florida)
    Applied Behavior Analysis, Assessment and Treatment of Problem Behavior, School-Based Interventions
  • Natalie Shook - Ph.D. (Ohio State University)
    Social Psychology, Attitudes and Emotion, Cognitive Bias

Assistant Professors

  • Melissa Blank - Ph.D. (Virginia Commonwealth University)
    Behavioral Neuroscience, Tobacco Use, Tobacco-Related Health Risks, Genetics of Substance Use
  • Regina Carroll - Ph.D. (University of Nebraska Medical Center)
    Applied Behavior Analysis, Autism and Developmental Disabilities
  • Steven Kinsey - Ph.D. (Ohio State University)
    Behavioral Neuroscience, Stress and Inflammation
  • Shari Steinman - Ph.D. (University of Virginia)
    Cognitive Bias in Anxiety Disorders, Treatment of Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders
  • Nicholas Turiano - Ph.D. (Purdue University)
    Personality, Health, and Aging
  • Cole Vonder Haar - Ph.D. (University of Southern Illinois – Carbondale)
    Behavioral Dysfunction and Traumatic Brain Injury, Behavioral Neuroscience

Teaching Associate Professor

  • Connie Toffle - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    Teaching of Psychology

Teaching Assistant Professors

  • Elizabeth Levelle - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    Teaching of Psychology, Academic Advising
  • Kris Martens - Ph.D. (Southern Illinois University – Carbondale)
    Behavioral Neuroscience, Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Sharon Tenenholz - Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles)
    Teaching of Psychology, Curriculum Design, Academic Advising

Clinical instructor

  • Stephanie McWilliams - MA (Columbia University)
    Youth Mentorship; Sport and Exercise Psychology, Health Psychology, Behavior Change and Weight Management

Professors emeriti

  • Stanley Cohen - Ph.D.
  • Philip Comer - Ph.D.
  • William J. Fremouw - Ph.D.
  • Robert Hawkins - Ph.D.
  • Kent Parker - Ph.D.
  • Hayne Reese - Ph.D.

Adjunct assistant professors

  • Martin Boone - Ph.D., (Oklahoma State University)
  • Kimberly Foley - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Keegan Kowcheck - MA (West Virginia University)
  • Kara Samaj - MA (West Virginia University)