History

http://history.wvu.edu/

Degrees Offered

  • Master of Arts
  • Atlantis Dual Degree Master of Arts
  • Doctor of Philosophy

Nature of the Program

The Department of History offers graduate work in the history of Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, public history, the United States including Appalachia/regional, and world history. In addition to our core areas of strength, the department encourages research that is comparative and transnational in perspective and scope. Faculty research and teaching interests are clustered thematically around four areas: Gender and Kinship, Imperial and Postcolonial Societies, Labor and Political Economy, and War and Society. Our program is designed to give students flexibility to create a plan of study that matches their interests, while at the same time provide a breadth of training in different fields that will prepare students in historiography, research methods, and teaching approaches. Students can select concentrations leading to preparation for careers in teaching and scholarship and as specialists for various branches of government, business, and public service. Students in the program are normally expected to pursue the degrees of master of arts or doctor of philosophy.

Atlantis Dual Degree Master of Arts

The department also participates, together with Collegium Civitas of Warsaw, Poland and the University of Tartu in Estonia, in a unique transatlantic multidisciplinary dual degree M.A. program in East-Central European area studies. Students from both sides of the Atlantic spend two academic semesters overseas and will complete relevant coursework at West Virginia University and one of the two European institutions. They also have the opportunity to acquire language training and gain valuable experience through professional internships.

Students will complete the equivalent of sixty U.S. credit hours: thirty hours in the history program at WVU, and thirty hours in the international relations program at Collegium Civitas or the Baltic studies program at the University of Tartu. Master’s theses will be defended at one of the two European institutions and WVU. The dual degrees, in history from WVU and in international relations or Baltic studies from one of the two European institutions, are awarded once credit hour and degree requirements are met at all three institutions.

regular M.A. ADMISSION

Students seeking admission to the regular master of arts program should have the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree in history. Applicants lacking this degree may be required to make up deficiencies. Application requirements include transcripts (a minimum of a 3.0 average in history courses is expected), three letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, writing sample, résumé, and a combined score of 300 on the verbal and quantitative sections and 4.0 on the written section of the Graduate Record Examination General Aptitude Test (GRE).

M.A. WITH EMPHASIS IN PUBLIC HISTORY ADMISSION

Students apply for admission to the public history area of emphasis as they would for the regular M.A. in history. The statement of purpose should highlight relevant background and reasons for interest in public history. Students in public history should have an undergraduate degree in history. Applicants lacking this degree may be required to make up deficiencies.

Atlantis Dual Degree Master of Arts admission

Students apply for admission to the Atlantis program as they would for the regular M.A. in history. The statement of purpose should highlight relevant background and reasons for interest in the East-Central European region. Students should have an undergraduate degree in relevant disciplines and programs such as history, Slavic and East European studies, international studies, geography, and/or political science. Otherwise, they must meet the same criteria for admission as applicants to the regular M.A. program.

Ph.D. Admission

Students seeking admission to the doctor of philosophy program should have the equivalent of a M.A. in history. Application requirements include a transcript (a minimum of a 3.0 average in graduate history courses is required), three letters of recommendation, and a combined score of 300 on the verbal and quantitative sections and a 4.0 on the written section of the Graduate Record Examination General Aptitude Test (GRE). Students should also include a statement of purpose, an example of their written work, and a résumé as a part of the application.

Master of Arts

Individual faculty may require their students to master one or more languages to demonstrate proficiency in particular research methods (quantitative analysis, paleography, GIS, etc.) or to develop other skills as necessary for their areas of study and thesis projects.

Major Requirements

Minimum GPA of 3.0 is required.
Graduate Colloquium
HIST 700Historiography3
Select an Area of Emphasis12
Select a minor area 6
History elective3
Select either the examination or thesis option:6
Examination Option:
Independent Study (Exam preparation)
Additional readings seminar
Examination
Thesis Option:
Research
Thesis Proposal
Thesis Defense
Total Hours30

Thesis Option

The M.A. in history (thesis or examination option) consists of thirty hours of coursework, of which no more than twelve hours may be at the 400 or 500-levels and the remainder at the 600 of higher level. Students who choose the thesis option must take one readings/research seminar sequence (HIST 701 and higher) as part of their thirty credit hours of coursework. They are also required to write a master's thesis in consultation with their main faculty advisor. The thesis must be based on original research that demonstrates a critical engagement with the secondary literature and is developed in multiple chapters. Students must first prepare a thesis prospectus, which must be approved by their thesis committee, before writing and successfully defending the thesis in an oral examination. A maximum of six hours of credit for HIST 697 can be taken for writing the thesis.

Examination Option

Students who choose this option must take one readings/research seminar sequence (HIST 701 and higher) plus an additional readings seminar (HIST 701 and higher) as part of their thirty credit hours of coursework. They cannot count thesis research credits as part of their thirty credit hours of coursework. In addition, in their final semester students must complete comprehensive exams in their major and minor fields, based on their coursework and in consultation with a faculty advisor for each field. The comprehensive exams include a written component and an oral defense. To prepare for the exam, students may take 3 hours of independent study (HIST 795) that count toward the required 30 hours.

Public History Area of Emphasis

Public historians are trained to conduct historical research and interpret the past for a variety of audiences. They generally work in museums, heritage sites, historic preservation, and archives as consultants and for the federal government. The M.A. in History with an area of emphasis in public history consists of thirty hours of coursework, of which no more than twelve hours may be at the 400 or 500-levels and the remainder at the 600 and higher level plus a six credit-hour internship (HIST 614).

HIST 614Internship in Public History6
HIST 750Public History Methods3
HIST 613Local History Research Methodology3
Readings/Research Seminar Sequence (HIST 701 or higher)6
Electives18
Total Hours36

Doctor of Philosophy

Individual faculty advisers may require their students to master one or more languages, to demonstrate proficiency in particular research methods (quantitative analysis, paleography, GIS, etc.), or to develop other skills as necessary for their fields of study and dissertation projects.

Major Requirements

Minimum GPA of 3.0 is required.
HIST 700Historiography3
Reading/Research Seminars12
HIST 799Graduate Colloquium4-6
Coursework in four fields of study (major field and three minor fields)
Comprehensive Examination
Dissertation Proposal
Dissertation
Dissertation Defense
Total Hours19-21

Fields of Study

A candidate must offer a program of study in four fields (a major field and three minor fields). At least three fields must be in history while the other may be in a related field with the approval of the director of graduate studies. Doctoral students must maintain a 3.0 grade point average to remain in good standing. Fields available in the department include, but are not limited to Africa, Appalachia/regional, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Students may also take a minor field in East Asia, public history, or world history. At least one field must be in a geographic area outside the student’s main area of concentration for dissertation work. For each field of study, students take a comprehensive examination (written and oral) based on knowledge derived from course work and readings from a book list prepared in consultation with the faculty field adviser.

Dissertation work should normally be in the history of the United States, Europe, Appalachia/regional, or modern Africa. Students working in these areas, either at the M.A. or Ph.D. level, have the opportunity to study with adjunct professors and faculty from other departments and universities.

Cultural Resource Management Certificate

The Eberly College of Arts and Sciences also offers an interdisciplinary graduate-level fifteen-hour certificate in cultural resource management (CRM) that is coordinated by the Department of History. Most CRM students earn the graduate certificate in conjunction with an M.A. in history, public administration, recreation parks and tourism, geography, design, art history, or one of several other related graduate degree programs. The requirements for the CRM certificate consist of twelve credit hours of coursework and a three-hour internship or an individual research project (HIST 620). All CRM students must successfully complete HIST 600. Students who are currently admitted to or enrolled in a graduate degree program must register their intent to earn the CRM certificate with the CRM coordinator during the semester prior to their internship. Students who wish to pursue the graduate certificate independent of a graduate degree program must be admitted as non-degree graduate students prior to registering their intent to earn the CRM certificate. Each student is expected to maintain an average GPA of 3.0.

Minimum GPA of 3.0 is required.
HIST 600Cultural Resource Management3
HIST 620Practicum in Cultural Resource Management3
Graduate coursework9
Total Hours15

Major Learning Goals

history

Students earning a M.A. or Ph.D. in History will be able to:

  • Demonstrate general knowledge of the facts, concepts, and approaches of history.
  • Demonstrate the ability to understand and critically evaluate the existing literature published within their specific field of research.
  • Critically analyze and assess both primary and secondary sources.
  • Conduct original historical research and construct manuscripts that are coherently argued, grammatically correct, and use proper historical documentation.
  • Clearly and effectively communicate the results of their research in oral and written formats.
  • Abide by the ethical and professional principles of the discipline of history. 

Courses

HIST 517. German Central Europe: Empires, States and Nations, 1648-1900. 3 Hours.

Explores the Habsburg Monarchy and Holy Roman Empire, following devastation of 30 years of War, Enlightenment and State-building, Industrialization and Nation-building until the eve of the Great War.

HIST 518. Twentieth Century German Central Europe. 3 Hours.

Explores the two World Wars, Holocaust, the Cold War, National Socialist, Communist, and Democratic regimes and Austria as well as the reunification of Germany following Revolutions of 1989.

HIST 525. History of Modern China. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of Chinese history with an emphasis on major events since the mid-19th century, placed in a broad context of the important political, economic, social, and diplomatic events in China's historic past.

HIST 526. History of Modern Japan. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of Japanese history with an emphasis on major events since the mid-19th century, placed in a broad context of the important political, economic, social, and diplomatic events in Japan's historic past.

HIST 550. West Virginia History. 3 Hours.

Elective course for public history graduate students and cultural resource management students.

HIST 558. United States Cultural History 1819-1893. 3 Hours.

Examines the cultural panics about identity and sensibility produced by capitalism, slavery, and war in the nineteenth-century United States.

HIST 575. Hollywood and History. 3 Hours.

Examines twentieth century American culture, politics and society through film. It explores the relationship between film and history, using films as primary sources for understanding the past and it examines how film is used in teaching history.

HIST 593A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

HIST 600. Cultural Resource Management. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Explores principles and practices of managing cultural and material historic resources, with an overview of best practices, federal requirements, and fundamental skills expected of the practitioner.

HIST 610. Historic Site Interpretation. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the craft of historic site interpretation. Readings, lectures, and field trips will explore current issues, approaches to developing meaningful experiences for visitors, and the transmission of culture through historic places.

HIST 611. Archival Management. 3 Hours.

PR: HIST 412. Principles and practices of archival work within a laboratory context. Includes lectures and selected readings illustrated by holdings and policies of West Virginia and Regional History Collection of the WVU Library.

HIST 613. Local History Research Methodology. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on research methods applicable to any locality; includes legal records, oral records, secondary sources, photographs, maps, and government documents.

HIST 614. Internship in Public History. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. A professional internship at a historical agency. Supervision is exercised by history department faculty and the host agency. Written and oral research report required. (Grading may be P/F.).

HIST 615. Museum Studies. 3 Hours.

Introduction to museum management and curation of collections of historic or archaeological significance. Students will learn the basic skills necessary to work with and use museum collections.

HIST 616. History of American Architecture. 3 Hours.

Overview of American architecture and architectural styles to enable students to correctly identify building styles in the field.

HIST 619. Understanding Preservation Law. 3 Hours.

Overview of legal issues and federal regulations and guidelines in the practice of historic preservation.

HIST 620. Practicum in Cultural Resource Management. 3 Hours.

Professional placement or scholarly research project designed to be the capstone experience for students in the CRM graduate certificate program. Placement is tailored to the area of student interest.

HIST 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

HIST 694A-Q. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

HIST 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project, or dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

HIST 700. Historiography. 3 Hours.

Core course for entering graduate students: critical survey of important contemporary approaches to history writing, methodological practices, and current issues in the field.

HIST 701. Readings in Medieval History. 3-6 Hours.

Examination of the literature, bibliography, sources, and research methods on selected problems in medieval history, using discussion and written reports on assigned readings. (May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.).

HIST 702. Seminar in Medieval History. 3 Hours.

PR: HIST 701; (Reading knowledge of Latin and a modern European language strongly recommended.) Directed examination of bibliographic sources and historiographical issues on selected aspects of the Middle Ages, leading to preparation of a research paper based on primary sources.

HIST 705. Readings in Early Modern History 3 Hr. 3 Hours.

Directed readings on selected major historiographical themes in European history relating to the period from the Renaissance to the French Revolution.

HIST 706. Seminar in Early Modern History. 3 Hours.

Research and writing of an article-length paper based on extensive and/or in-depth analysis of early modern primary sources. Class presentations and discussions of colleagues' work.

HIST 708. Readings In Central European History. 3-6 Hours.

All students will read and discuss selected works illustrating outstanding scholarship or interpretative problems related to modern Central European History. Opportunity will be also provided for individual reading projects. (May be repeated once).

HIST 709. Seminar in Central European History. 3 Hours.

An intensive survey of the bibliographical aids and printed source materials available in the field. A research paper and a bibliographical essay will be presented by each student. Reading knowledge of German and French strongly recommended. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 714. Readings in Eastern European History. 3-6 Hours.

Intensive readings on specific topics in Russian, Soviet or East European history. Students should normally have had History 217 and 218, or their equivalents. Primarily designed for graduate students and selected undergraduates.

HIST 715. Seminar In Eastern European History. 3 Hours.

PR: HIST 117, 118 or equivalent. Research seminar on selected topics in Russian, Soviet, or Eastern European history. One major paper and extensive reading based on available source materials is required. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 717. Readings In Modern European History. 3 Hours.

The object of this course is to familiarize graduate students with the main themes and approaches in the historiography of Modern Europe from the Enlightenment to the end of the twentieth century. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 718. Seminar in Modern European History. 3 Hours.

A research seminar in selected topics in modern European history. One major paper and extensive reading based on available source material is required. A reading knowledge of the appropriate language is required, if applicable.

HIST 721. Readings in Asian History. 3 Hours.

Intensive readings in the history of East Asia (especially China and Japan) since the nineteenth century; students should normally have had HIST 425 and 426, or their equivalents; reviews, as well as bibliographical and historiographical essays, required. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 722. Seminar in Asian History. 3 Hours.

Advanced readings in East Asian history; specific emphasis on research tools and techniques; research paper based on English-language sources required; students should normally have had HIST 425 and 426 or their equivalents. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 725. Readings in African History. 3 Hours.

This course will normally focus on readings and discussion on problems in the history of pre-colonial Africa, the major works in African history, and recent interpretations in the field. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 726. Seminar in African History. 3 Hours.

The seminar will normally focus on eastern Africa in the colonial period. Location and use of source materials will be emphasized as well as economic and political developments. Students will spend considerable time in research and writing on selected aspects of eastern African history. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 729. Readings in Latin American History. 3 Hours.

Critical examination of selected sources and topics for understanding and interpreting Latin American history. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 730. Seminar In Latin American History. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Survey of Latin American historiography, location and use of primary source materials, discussion of research techniques, and the writing of a research paper. Reading knowledge of Spanish, Portuguese, or French will be helpful. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 731. Readings In American History: 1585-1763. 3 Hours.

Supervised readings and reports designed to prepare students for intensive study in a seminar or for field examinations in colonial American history. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 732. Seminar in American History: 1585-1763. 3 Hours.

PR: HIST 331 or consent. Directed research on colonial American history, using original and secondary materials. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 750. Public History Methods. 3 Hours.

This course provides the foundations of public history as students examine approaches to historical interpretation for public audiences. Topics will include client-driven research, commemoration, and cultural heritage tourism.

HIST 755. Readings in American History: 1763-1800. 3 Hours.

Readings and reports designed to prepare students for an intensive study in a seminar or field examination. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 756. Seminar In American History: 1763-1830. 3 Hours.

PR: HIST 755 or consent. Advanced readings and research in revolutionary and early national American history. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 757. Readings in United States History: 1787-1850. 3 Hours.

Critical examination of major works and themes on the political, economic, social, and legal formation of the nation. (May be repeated once.) (Alternate years.).

HIST 758. Seminar in United States History: 1787-1850. 3 Hours.

Directed research in early United States history. Research will include primary and secondary sources. (May be repeated once.) (Alternate years.).

HIST 759. Readings in United States History: 1840-1898. 3 Hours.

Survey of interpretative literature on Sectionalism, Civil War, Reconstruction and Gilded Age. Assignments are both oral and written reports on assigned readings and a critical essay on some aspect of American historiography for this period.

HIST 760. Seminar in United States History: 1850-1898. 3 Hours.

Directed research in mid-and late 19th century American history, including guidance in methods of research and manuscript preparation. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 763. Readings in United States History: 1898-Present. 3 Hours.

Readings and class-led discussion of one paperback book per week, and preparation of a paper based on these books and the class discussion of them. (Course may be repeated for credit.).

HIST 764. Seminar in United States History: 1898-Present. 3 Hours.

Directed research in recent American history including guidance in methods of research and manuscript preparation. May be repeated once.

HIST 765. Readings in United States Diplomatic History. 3 Hours.

Readings in U.S. Diplomatic History with an emphasis on the 20th century.

HIST 766. Seminar in United States Diplomatic History. 3 Hours.

Directed research in the history of U.S. foreign policy with emphasis on 20th century including guidance in methods of research and manuscript preparation.

HIST 773. Readings in Appalachian Regional History. 3 Hours.

A course for graduate students and seniors in the history of West Virginia and neighboring states, which form what is known as the Trans-Allegheny or Upper Ohio region. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 774. Seminar in Appalachian Regional History. 3 Hours.

A seminar for graduate students in the history of West Virginia and neighboring states, which form what is known as the Trans-Allegheny or Upper Ohio region. (May be repeated once.).

HIST 775. Readings in Science and Technology. 3-6 Hours.

Examination of the literature, bibliography, and sources on selected topics in the history of science and technology. Class discussions and written reports on assigned topics. (Course may be repeated for credit.).

HIST 776. Seminar in Science and Technology. 3 Hours.

PR: HIST 775 or consent. Research seminar in the history of science and technology. Discussion of methods and sources; presentation and critique of research papers based on primary sources. (Course may be repeated for credit.).

HIST 782. Readings in United States Social History. 3 Hours.

The objective of the course is to establish for graduate students usable frames of reference for selected topics in social history by examining the ways in which historians have written about these topics. (Course may be repeated for credit.).

HIST 785. Readings in Environmental History. 3 Hours.

Examines broad themes including settlement patterns, attitudes toward nature, the rise of ecological science, and agricultural and industrial practices. Explores historiographical and methodological issues. (May be repeated once.) (Alternate years.).

HIST 786. Seminar in Environmental History. 3 Hours.

Directed research involving primary and secondary sources. Will focus on regional case studies and examination of broad intellectual and policy themes. (May be repeated once.) (Alternate years.).

HIST 787. Readings in World History. 3 Hours.

Core course for teaching concentration in world history; review of selected exemplary and recent readings in world history; evaluation of textbooks and teaching materials; composition of syllabi, lectures, and assignments.

HIST 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practices in college teaching of history. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibilities. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

HIST 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

HIST 792A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

HIST 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

HIST 794A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

HIST 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

HIST 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

HIST 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

HIST 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

HIST 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

HIST 900. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology). The continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.

HIST 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology). These tuition-waived continuing education courses are graded on pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.


Faculty

Chair

  • Joseph Hodge - Ph.D. (Queen's University at Kingston)
    Modern Britain, British Empire, decolonization, international development, Africa

Associate Chair

  • Kathryn Staples - Ph.D. (University of Minnesota)
    Medieval, gender, England, material culture

Professors

  • Katherine Aaslestad - Ph.D. (University of Illinois)
    Modern Europe, Germany
  • Robert E. Blobaum - Ph.D. (University of Nebraska)
    Eberly Family Professor of History, modern Central and Eastern Europe
  • William I. Brustein - Ph.D. (University of Washington)
    European fascism, European political and religious extremism, comparative anti-Semitism
  • Elizabeth Fones-Wolf - Ph.D. (University of Massachusetts)
    20th-century U.S., social and economic
  • Kenneth Fones-Wolf - Ph.D. (Temple University) Stuart and Joyce Robbins Distinguished Chair in History
    U.S. labor, Appalachia, immigration, religion
  • Robert M. Maxon - Ph.D. (Syracuse University)
    Africa, East Africa, colonial Kenya
  • Matthew A. Vester - Ph.D. - (University of California)
    Early modern Europe, Italy

Associate Professor

  • Joshua Arthurs - Ph.D. (University of Chicago)
    Modern Europe, Italy, cultural
  • Melissa Bingmann - Ph.D. (Arizona State University)
    Public history, 20th-century U.S.
  • Tyler Boulware - Ph.D. (University of South Carolina)
    Early U.S., frontier, Native American
  • Joseph Hodge - Ph.D. (Queen’s University at Kingston)
    Modern Britain, British Empire,decolonization, international development, Africa
  • Brian Luskey - Ph.D. (Emory University)
    19th-century U.S, social and cultural
  • Jason Phillips - Ph.D. (Rice University)
    Eberly Professor of Civil War Studies, civil war, reconstruction, southern history, 19th-century U.S.
  • James Siekmeier - Ph.D. (Cornell University)
    U.S. diplomatic, Latin America
  • Kathryn Staples - Ph.D. (University of Minnesota)
    Medieval, gender, England, material culture
  • Mark B. Tauger - Ph.D. (UCLA)
    20th-century Russia/USSR, world/comparative, historiography

Assistant Professor

  • Krystal Frazier - Ph.D. (Rutgers University)
    African American, oral history
  • Macabe Keliher - Ph.D. - (Harvard University)
    East Asia, China
  • William Gorby - Ph.D. - (West Virginia University)
    West Virginia, Appalachia
  • Tamba E. M'bayo - Ph.D. (Michigan State University)
    West Africa, African diaspora and Pan-Africanism
  • Michele Stephens - Ph.D. (University of Oklahoma)
    Latin America, indigenous peoples race and gender

Lecturers

  • Jenny Boulware - M.A. (University of South Carolina)
    Public history
  • Carletta Bush - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    West Virginia regional

Emeriti Faculty

  • William S. Arnett
    Associate Professor
  • Jack Hammersmith
    Professor
  • Barbara J. Howe
    Associate Professor
  • Elizabeth K. Hudson
    Associate Professor
  • Emory L. Kemp
    Professor
  • Ronald L. Lewis
    Eberly Chair and Professor
  • Stephen C. McCluskey
    Professor
  • A. Michal McMahon
    Associate Professor
  • John C. Super
    Professor