English

http://english.wvu.edu/

Degrees Offered

  • Master of Arts
  • Master of Arts in Professional Writing and Editing
  • Master of Fine Arts
  • Doctor of Philosophy

Master of Arts 

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in English is a two-year program designed for students who have shown an aptitude for sustained literary study and who desire to pursue a more intensive and extensive academic training. The M.A. program has five primary goals: (1) to extend the student’s knowledge of the cultural, linguistic, and literary heritage of Great Britain, America, and other English-speaking lands, (2) to introduce students to the critical and professional discourses of academics in literary and linguistic studies, (3) to develop the student’s research, writing, and analytical skills, which are necessary for professional success, (4) to provide professional training to prepare students to teach English at the post-secondary level, and (5) to counsel students to craft their program of study to meet their professional and personal needs.

The M.A. program meets these goals by providing a rotation of courses in literature, linguistics, theory, and pedagogy that require extensive reading, writing, research, and oral presentations. With small classes, students receive individual attention from the faculty, which facilitates student progress. M.A. students are eligible for teaching assistantships within the English Department, which provides training in pedagogy.

The knowledge and skills that students acquire in the M.A. program provide the requisite foundation to pursue doctoral work in English, with the ultimate goal of becoming a professional scholar and academic at a post-secondary institution. The academic training provided by the M.A. also is applicable for careers in secondary education, professional writing, and editing. 

Master of Arts in Professional Writing and Editing

The M.A. in Professional Writing and Editing is a thirty-hour degree that combines theories of writing with practice in real-world writing situations. Students will study professional writing theory, the history of rhetoric, editing, rhetorical analysis, new modes of digital composition, and writing ethics. This degree prepares students for a variety of career options, including technical writing and editing, project management, writing consulting, writing instruction, and advanced graduate study in rhetoric and composition. The degree is designed for both newly-graduated undergraduates and working adults who want more training in writing and editing.

Master of Fine Arts

The Master of Fine Arts in creative writing is a three-year academic/studio program that combines an apprenticeship to the craft with more traditionally academic elements. This approach seeks to train students in ways that reflect the realities of the writer/artist’s evolving role in the academy. Because writers, when hired to teach, are often asked to handle a variety of courses beyond the creative writing workshop, the academic/studio format requires students to take literature and pedagogy courses in addition to writing workshops.

Thus, the M.F.A. is both an academic and a professional degree. As part of WVU’s comprehensive Center for Writing Excellence, this degree allows students to prepare for careers in teaching or professional writing/editing. Our objective is to nurture and mentor the many writers in the region seeking professional training. We also intend to attract student writers from all over the country to West Virginia for the opportunity to live and write in this culturally-rich state and to work with our faculty. The ultimate goal is to produce writers who will publish literature and contribute to the culture. A secondary goal is to offer practical skills and opportunities to writers interested in pursuing writing-related professions. 

Doctor of Philosophy

The doctoral program in English offers opportunities for specialization in literary studies, cultural studies, or composition and rhetoric. The program has five goals: (1) to build upon the broad foundations of the M.A. degree’s focus on the cultural, linguistic, and literary heritage of Britain, America, and other English-speaking lands, (2) to help students to develop fluency in the critical discourses of the profession, (3) to help students to develop professional competency in three fields of research, as dictated by the Examination for Formal Admission to Candidacy, (4) to help students to develop the research, writing, and analytical skills necessary for professional success, and (5) to provide professional training and counseling to prepare graduates to teach English professionally on the post-secondary level.

These goals are met by the various features of our program, which include coursework, examinations, and both formal and informal instruction and advising regarding professional teaching and research responsibilities. Doctoral study culminates in the writing of the dissertation, which is designed to contribute to the critical and/or theoretical discussion in its field and to prepare the doctoral candidate for further research and publication as a professional scholar and teacher.

Admissions

MA in English

To be admitted to the Department of English as prospective candidates for the degree of master of arts, students are expected to have completed work comparable to the department’s undergraduate requirement for English majors (but with records distinctly above the average), and to present as part of their applications their scores on the verbal and analytic sections of the Graduate Record Examination General Aptitude Test and, if non-native speakers of English, their TOEFL scores. Past experience has shown that successful graduate students usually score at least the sixtieth percentile on the verbal section of the GRE. Students also must provide three letters of reference and a sample of their academic writing.

Professional Writing and Editing 

Prospective candidates for admission are expected to have completed an undergraduate degree in English or an allied field with a record distinctly above average or to have at least two years’ work experience in writing and editing. Applications must be supported by a portfolio of written work and three letters of recommendation. The GRE analytical writing test, taken within the last five years, is recommended; successful candidates will typically present a score of five or above. The program recognizes, however, that not all potentially excellent graduate students fit this profile and welcomes applications from individuals who can make a strong case that they will succeed. Non-native English speakers must present TOEFL scores of at least 600 for the written exam or equivalent scores for the online version.

Creative Writing 

Prospective candidates for the degree of master of fine arts are normally expected to have completed a bachelor’s degree in English. Admission to the program is based primarily on the excellence of a substantial writing sample in fiction, nonfiction, or poetry (ten to twenty pages of poetry; twenty to thirty pages of prose). Also required are Graduate Record Examination scores, three letters of recommendation, and a personal statement. Non-native speakers of English must present TOEFL scores. Past experience has shown that successful graduate students usually score above the sixtieth percentile on the verbal section of the GRE.

PhD in English

Applicants for admission to the program will be judged on the bases of academic record, three recommendations from former teachers, a statement of purpose outlining their academic and professional goals, a sample of their academic writing, and Graduate Record Examination General Aptitude Test scores. Non-native speakers of English must also present their TOEFL scores.

Master of Arts

Major Requirements

ENGL 609College Composition Pedagogy *3
ENGL 680Introduction to Literary Research3
or ENGL 682 Recent Literary Criticism
American Literature:3
American Literature to 1865
American Literature, 1865-1915
American Literature, 1915-Present
Seminar in American Studies
British Literature:3
Old English 1
Old English 2
Medieval Literature
Shakespeare
Renaissance Literature
Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature
Romantic Literature
Victorian Literature
Twentieth-Century British Literature
Seminar in Medieval Studies
Seminar in Renaissance Studies, 1550-1660
Seminar in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Studies
Seminar in British Romanticism
Seminar in Victorian Studies
Seminar in Twentieth-Century British Studies
Pre-1800 Literature:3
Old English 1
Old English 2
Medieval Literature
Shakespeare
Renaissance Literature
Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature
Special Topics
Seminar in Medieval Studies
Seminar in Renaissance Studies, 1550-1660
Seminar in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Studies
Post 1800 Literature:3
American Literature, 1865-1915
American Literature, 1915-Present
Victorian Literature
Twentieth-Century British Literature
Seminar in Victorian Studies
Seminar in Twentieth-Century British Studies
Coursework or Thesis Option: **6
600 or 700-level seminars
Thesis or Dissertation
Seminar Requirement (700 level courses excluding ENGL 790)6
Foreign Language Requirement
Total Hours30
*

 Students who do not hold an assistantship will substitute three additional hours of electives.

**

A maximum of three hours of Independent Study (ENGL 695 or ENGL 795) may be counted toward the elective hours. Students may take 3 hours of coursework in another department, subject to the approval of the Graduate Program Committee.

Foreign Language Requirement 

The foreign language requirement for the M.A. is satisfied by successfully completing (receiving an A or B in the last course) a second-year level of foreign language study at an accredited college or university (or its international equivalent) within the last five years or by passing (with a B or better) the examination administered by the Department of Foreign Languages for “credit by exam” for the fourth semester course of a language sequence. Exams are available in French, German, Spanish, or Latin.

Master of Arts in Professional Writing and Editing

Major Requirements

ENGL 601Studies in Composition and Rhetoric3
ENGL 602Editing3
ENGL 605Professional Writing Theory3
ENGL 609College Composition Pedagogy *3
Internship or Thesis Option:3-6
Professional Writing Internship
Thesis or Dissertation
Professional Writing and Editing 600-level electives6
General Distribution English coursework9
Language Requirement
Total Hours30-33
*

 Students who do not hold an assistantship will substitute three additional hours of electives.

Professional Writing and Editing Electives

In consultation with the advisor, students will individualize their plan of study by choosing two 600-level courses that develop a specific focus within the general field of professional writing and editing. Students must work with an advisor to file an approved plan of study by the end of their first semester of study.

General Distribution
Students must complete nine–twelve hours of general English studies. Courses will include literature, writing, and/or linguistics courses offered by the Department of English and chosen in consultation with the advisor. General distribution hours may often include requirements dictated by graduate teaching status, prior coursework, and departmental guidelines. Students may not use the same course(s) to fulfill the general distribution and professional writing electives requirements.

Practical Experience
Students must choose one of the following two summative experiences: ENGL 610 (three hours) or ENGL 698 (six hours). The directed study option is a workplace internship.

Language Requirement  
The M.A. in PWE requires that students demonstrate proficiency in foreign language, statistics, or computer programming in one of following ways:

  • Completing a 204 (Intermediate II) or 200 (Intensive Intermediate) language course in a modern foreign language with a grade of B or above or completion of the Graduate Student Foreign Language Exam administered by the Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
  • Earning a B or above in the second-year level of foreign language study at an accredited college or university (or its international equivalent) within the last five years
  • Participating in a University-approved study abroad program of four or more weeks in a non-English-speaking host country will also fulfill the language requirement if, as part of the experience, students are required to study the language and culture of the host country. As part of the study abroad program, students must enroll in at least one three-credit-hour course and earn a grade of B or above.
  • Completing STAT 201 Applied Statistical Modeling with a grade of B or above
  • Completing CS 110 Introduction to Computer Science and its accompanying one credit hour lab with a grade of B or above

A student should state in the plan of study the means by which he or she plans to satisfy the language requirement.

Master of Fine Arts

Major Requirements

Minimum grade of B- is required in all courses applied toward degree.
Creative Writing Workshops: 15
Graduate Writing Workshop: Poetry
Graduate Writing Workshop: Fiction
Graduate Writing Workshop: Non-Fiction
Pedagogy Requirement3
College Composition Pedagogy
Creative Writing Mentoring
Non Creative Writing English Courses *12
Thesis9
Thesis or Dissertation
Electives **6
Book-length Manuscript ***
Thesis Defense
Total Hours45

Students must complete fifteen hours of creative writing workshops with three hours outside of the student’s primary genre.  

*

Any courses at the 500 or 600 or 700 level, except ENGL 611, ENGL 618, or ENGL 618A, or ENGL 618B, or ENGL 688, or ENGL 689, or ENGL 698, or ENGL 790.

**

Any courses at the 500 or 600 or 700 level, except ENGL 689, or ENGL 698, or ENGL 790.

***

The student is required to submit a book-length manuscript (ideally 48 pages in poetry, 150 pages in fiction or nonfiction) suitable for publication on its own, that has been approved by a thesis advisor and two additional thesis committee members. Final approval is granted following an oral defense of the thesis.

Doctor of Philosophy 

During the second year in residence, students must submit for approval a portfolio of academic work.

Major Requirements

English Coursework *18
College Composition Pedagogy
Introduction to Literary Research
Current Directions in Literary Study
6 hours of 700-level seminars
Teaching Practicum **
Teaching Practicum
Foreign Language Requirement
Dissertation Credit12
Thesis or Dissertation
Portfolio
Dissertation Proposal
Dissertation
Dissertation Defense
Total Hours30
*

Students may take up to twelve hours of coursework in another department, subject to the approval of the Graduate Program Committee. 

**

Students are required to teach one 3-hour composition course and one three-hour literature course while in residence and to register concurrently for ENGL 790; this requirement may be waived pending departmental approval for candidates who have substantial prior teaching experience. ENGL 790 does not count toward the 30 required hours of coursework.

Foreign Language Requirement

The foreign language requirement is the same as for the M.A. program and must be completed prior to taking the examination for formal admission to candidacy.

Doctoral Dissertation

After completing coursework, passing the examination for formal admission to candidacy, and fulfilling the language and teaching requirements, the student, under the direction of the dissertation committee chairperson, writes a prospectus of the final project. The prospectus must be approved by the dissertation committee. The dissertation, meant to be an original contribution to scholarship in its field, should be able to be completed in one year. The final examination (oral defense of the dissertation) is open to the public.

Major Learning Goals

English

PhD in Literature

The doctoral program in English has five goals: (1) to build upon the broad foundations of the M.A. degree’s focus on the cultural, linguistic, and literary heritage of Britain, America, and other English-speaking lands; (2) to help students to develop fluency in the critical discourses of the profession; (3) to help students to develop professional competency in three fields of research, as dictated by the Examination for Formal Admission to Candidacy; (4) to help students to develop the research, writing, and analytical skills necessary for professional success; and (5) to provide professional training and counseling to prepare graduates to teach English professionally on the post-secondary level.


These goals are met by the various features of our program, which include course work, examinations, and both formal and informal instruction and advising regarding professional teaching and research responsibilities. Doctoral study culminates in the writing of the dissertation, which is designed to contribute to the critical and/or theoretical discussion in its field and to prepare the doctoral candidate for further research and publication as a professional scholar and teacher. 


MA in Literature

The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in English is designed for students who have shown an aptitude for sustained literary study, and who desire to pursue a more intensive and extensive academic training. The two-year M.A. program has five primary goals: (1) to extend the student’s knowledge of the cultural, linguistic, and literary heritage of Great Britain, America, and other English-speaking lands; (2) to introduce students to the critical and professional discourses of academics in literary and linguistic studies; (3) to develop the student’s research, writing, and analytical skills, which are necessary for professional success; (4) to provide professional training to prepare students to teach English at the post-secondary level; and (5) to counsel students to craft their program of study to meet their professional and personal needs.


The M.A. program meets these goals by providing a rotation of courses in literature, linguistics, theory, and pedagogy that require extensive reading, writing, research, and oral presentations. With small classes, students receive individual attention from the faculty, which facilitates student progress. M.A. students are eligible for teaching assistantships within the English Department, which provide training in pedagogy. 
 

MA in Professional Writing and Editing

The learning outcomes for the M.A. in PWE reflect the program’s mixture of theory and practice:

  1. Recognize and evaluate a variety of ethical, social, legal, and political values intertwined in the production and consumption of technical communications.
  2. Analyze the uses and applications of new communication technologies.
  3. Acquire historical and critical understanding of rhetorical theories and practices.
  4. Master a variety of research and analytical methods, especially as these apply to the study and practical application of oral, written, and visual communication in professional contexts.
  5. Acquire a practical and theoretical understanding of workplace dynamics including client relations and project management skills.

MFA in Creative Writing

The Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing emphasizes the following as goals and outcomes for students graduating from the program:

  1. The mastery of a specific literary tradition relevant to the student's genre and craft;
  2. The mastery of the revision process;
  3. The clear articulation of aesthetic principles;
  4. A solid familiarity with genres other than the student's principal genre;  
  5. A firm understanding of the writing profession.

Courses

ENGL 507. The Writing of Health and Medicine. 3 Hours.

PR: Departmental approval. Explores genres important to health and medicine. Students read, analyze, and write texts in these genres-considering their audiences, purposes, and conventions as well as the role specific texts play in shaping the practices and experiences of health and medicine. Students may not earn credit for both ENGL 407 and ENGL 507.

ENGL 508. Rhetoric and Science. 3 Hours.

This course explores the relationship between rhetoric and science. Students will analyze the audiences, purposes, and conventions of scientific arguments as well as the role of specific texts in shaping scientific disciplines and debates. No background in science is required.

ENGL 550. Introduction to Forensic Linguistics. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the analysis of language for legal purposes and provides them first-hand experience in forensic linguistics. The course focuses on the application of linguistic theory, research, and procedures to issues of the law. In their final project, students analyze language data and provide a forensic linguistic report. Also listed as ENGL 450.

ENGL 601. Studies in Composition and Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

Historical developments in the field of composition and rhetoric as it relates to current issues and practices.

ENGL 602. Editing. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the theory and practice of editing.

ENGL 605. Professional Writing Theory. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the history of, development of, and current issues in professional writing theory and research.

ENGL 606. Topics in Humanities Computing. 3 Hours.

Topics rotate by semester; check with instructor. Topics may include: literary studies (electronic editions, hypertext, computer games, and virtual environments); critical theory (techno-theory, narrative theory); composition theory (rhetoric of online media, pedagogy); creative writing in digital media.

ENGL 607. Topics in Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

Topics vary by year; check with instructor. Course may include textual, historical, critical, and/or theoretical study. Not restricted to any one period or century.

ENGL 608. Writing Project Summer Institute. 3-6 Hours.

Experienced teachers examine issues in the teaching of writing and study current and past research in the field.

ENGL 609. College Composition Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to theories, practices, and current issues in teaching college composition. Restricted to GTAs in the English department.

ENGL 610. Professional Writing Internship. 3,6 Hours.

PR: ENGL 601 and ENGL 602 and ENGL 605. Student applies research and theory to writing tasks in a professional setting; (100 workplace hours for 3 credits; 200 hours for 6 credits.).

ENGL 611. Sturm Workshop. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Creative writing workshop conducted by Sturm visiting writer in residence.

ENGL 618A. Graduate Writing Workshop: Fiction. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Advanced workshop in creative writing. Genre and focus vary from semester to semester.

ENGL 618B. Graduate Writing Workshop: Non-Fiction. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Advanced workshop in creative writing. Genre and focus vary from semester to semester.

ENGL 623. Old English 1. 3 Hours.

Study of Anglo-Saxon with selected readings from the literature of the period.

ENGL 624. Old English 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ENGL 623. Beowulf and other texts in Old English.

ENGL 631. Studies in Nonfiction Prose. 3 Hours.

Advanced study in the genre of nonfiction, with emphasis varying from year to year. Course may include textual, historical, critical, formalist, and/or theoretical study. Not restricted to any one period or century.

ENGL 632. Studies in Poetry. 3 Hours.

Advanced study in the genre of poetry, with emphasis varying from year to year. Course may include textual, historical, critical, formalist, and/or theoretical study. Not restricted to any one period or century.

ENGL 634. Studies in Drama. 3 Hours.

Advanced study in the genre of drama, with emphasis varying from year to year. Course may include textual, historical, critical, formalist, and/or theoretical study. Not restricted to any one period or century.

ENGL 635. Studies in the Novel. 3 Hours.

Advanced study in the genre of the novel, with emphasis varying from year to year. Course may include textual, historical, critical, formalist, and/or theoretical study. Not restricted to any one period or century.

ENGL 636A. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636B. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636C. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636D. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636E. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636F. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636G. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636H. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636I. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636J. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636K. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636L. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636M. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636N. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636O. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636P. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636Q. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636R. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636S. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636T. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636U. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636V. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more majors authors.

ENGL 636W. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636X. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636Y. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 636Z. Study of Selected Authors. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of one or more major authors.

ENGL 646. American Literature to 1865. 3 Hours.

Readings in the literature of America from its beginnings to 1865; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history.

ENGL 647. American Literature, 1865-1915. 3 Hours.

Readings in the literature of America from 1865-1915; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history.

ENGL 648. American Literature, 1915-Present. 3 Hours.

Readings in the literature of America from 1915 to the present; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history.

ENGL 661. Medieval Literature. 3 Hours.

Readings in the literature of the medieval period; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary theory.

ENGL 663. Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of selected plays. Special attention to textual problems and to language and poetic imagery, together with the history of Shakespearean criticism and scholarship.

ENGL 664. Renaissance Literature. 3 Hours.

Readings in the literature of the English renaissance; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history.

ENGL 666. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature. 3 Hours.

Readings in the literature of England during the Restoration and the eighteenth century; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history.

ENGL 668. Romantic Literature. 3 Hours.

Readings in the literature of England during the Romantic period; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history.

ENGL 669. Victorian Literature. 3 Hours.

Readings in the literature of England during the Victorian period; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history.

ENGL 671. Twentieth-Century British Literature. 3 Hours.

Readings on the literature of England during the twentieth century; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history.

ENGL 680. Introduction to Literary Research. 1-6 Hours.

Bibliography; materials and tools of literary investigations; methods of research in various fields of literary history and interpretation; problem of editing. Practical guidance in the writing of theses.

ENGL 682. Recent Literary Criticism. 3 Hours.

Brief survey of theories of major schools of recent criticism and an application of these theories to selected literary works.

ENGL 688. Creative Writing Mentoring. 3 Hours.

Supervised practice in mentoring advanced undergraduate creative writers.

ENGL 689. Writing and Editing Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Supervised practice in writing and editing. (Grading will be S/U.).

ENGL 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ENGL 692A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading and/or research.

ENGL 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

ENGL 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

ENGL 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

ENGL 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement in the semester in which graduation occurs.

ENGL 701. Seminar in Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

PR: ENGL 601, or ENGL 605, or ENGL 609. Topics vary. Focus will be on a problem or issue in rhetorical studies that reflect the instructor's current research (check with instructor).

ENGL 741. Seminar in American Studies. 3 Hours.

Seminar in principal authors and movements in American literature.

ENGL 761. Seminar in Medieval Studies. 3 Hours.

Topics in English literature, 900-1500.

ENGL 764. Seminar in Renaissance Studies, 1550-1660. 3 Hours.

Studies in major authors and special topics in the Renaissance.

ENGL 766. Seminar in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Studies. 3 Hours.

Studies in major authors and special topics in the period.

ENGL 768. Seminar in British Romanticism. 3 Hours.

Studies in major authors and special topics in the field of British Romanticism.

ENGL 769. Seminar in Victorian Studies. 3 Hours.

Research and discussion in selected topics in the literature and history of the period.

ENGL 771. Seminar in Twentieth-Century British Studies. 3 Hours.

Seminar in principal authors and movements in twentieth-century British literature.

ENGL 782. Current Directions in Literary Study. 3 Hours.

PR: Advanced graduate standing (prior completion of ENGL 682 is recommended). Intensive study of one or more current approaches to literature and theories of criticism, with some emphasis on the interrelations of literary study with other disciplines.

ENGL 789. Folger Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Graduate standing. (Enrollment is by special application only. Contact department chairperson for information.) Seminar conducted by distinguished scholars and held at the Folger Institute in Washington, D.C. Topics vary.

ENGL 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of English. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

ENGL 793A-C. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

ENGL 794A-K. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

ENGL 794K. Seminar. 1-6Hr. Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

ENGL 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

ENGL 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

ENGL 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

ENGL 90. Developmental Writing. 3 Hours.

A course specifically designed for students needing to develop basic writing skills. Entering freshman who score 18 or less on the ACT English or who score below 450 on the SAT verbal may not register for ENGL 101 until they receive a grade of C or better in this course. (Not offered on the Morgantown campus.).

ENGL 900. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g. education, community health, geology.) The continuing education courses are graded on a pass//fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.

ENGL 91. Fundamental Reading. 2 Hours.

PR: ACT 0-16 or SAT 200- 439 in reading. Course must be completed in the student's first semester and prior to enrolling in ENGL 101. A course to improve reading speed and comprehension for those deficient in language skills. Grading will be pass/ fail. Credit is not applicable toward graduation.

ENGL 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology.) These tuition-waived continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.


Faculty

Chair

  • James Harms - M.F.A. (Indiana University)

ASSOCIATE CHAIR

  • Brian Ballentine - Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)

M.A. & PH.D. PROGRAM SUPERVISOR

  • Adam Komisaruk - Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles)

M.F.A. Program Supervisor

  • Mary Ann Samyn - M.F.A. (University of Virginia)

M.A. P.W.E. Program Supervisor

  • Brian Ballentine - Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)

Professors

  • Laura Brady - Ph.D. (University of Minnesota)
    Eberly Family Distinguished Professor of Outstanding Teaching, Composition and Rhetorical Theory, Writing Program Administration, Women’s Studies
  • Mark Brazaitis - M.F.A. (Bowling Green State University)
    Creative Writing: Fiction
  • Ryan Claycomb - Ph.D. (University of Maryland)
    20th-century British Literature, Drama
  • Stephanie Foote - Ph.D. (University of Buffalo)
    Jackson and Nichols Professor of English, Gender and women's studies, Critical theory
  • Marilyn Francus - Ph.D. (Columbia University)
    Restoration and 18th-century Literature and Culture, Women's Studies
  • James Harms - M.F.A. (Indiana University)
    Creative Writing: Poetry, Contemporary Poetry
  • Kirk Hazen - Ph.D. (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill)
    Linguistics, Sociolinguistics
  • John Lamb - Ph.D. (New York University)
    Victorian Literature, 19th-century historiography
  • Mary Ann Samyn - M.F.A. (University of Virginia)
    Creative Writing: Poetry
  • Timothy Sweet - Ph.D. (University of Minnesota)
    Eberly Family Distinguished Professor of American Literature, American Studies (17th-19th Century), Literature and Environment, Native American Literature

Associate Professors

  • Cheryl Ball - Ph.D. (Michigan Technological University)
    Digital editing and publishing
  • Brian Ballentine - Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
    Technical and professional communication, Digital rhetoric
  • Gwen Bergner - Ph.D. (Princeton University)
    African-American and Multi-ethnic Literatures, Post-colonial Studies
  • Cari Carpenter - Ph.D. (University of Michigan)
    19th-century American Literature, Native American Literature
  • Anna Shannon Elfenbein - Ph.D. (University of Nebraska)
    American Literature, Women’s Studies, Film
  • Lara Farina - Ph.D. (Fordham University)
    Medieval Literature and Culture, Gender Studies
  • Michael Germana - Ph.D. (University of Iowa)
    American Studies, 19th and 20th-century American Literature, Popular Culture
  • Catherine Gouge - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    Professional Writing, New Media Studies, Distance Learning
  • Rosemary Hathaway - Ph.D. (Ohio State University)
    Folklore, English Education, 20th-century American Literature
  • Adam Komisaruk - Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles)
    Romanticism and 18th-century British Literature
  • Kathleen O’Hearn Ryan - Ph.D. (University of Massachusetts-Amherst)
    20th-century American Literature
  • Nathalie Singh-Corcoran - Ph.D. (University of Arizona)
    Writing Center Theory and Practice, Writing Assessment
  • Lisa Weihman - Ph.D. (New York University)
    19th and 20th-century British and Irish Literature and Culture

Assistant Professors

  • Rose Casey - Ph.D. (Cornell University)
    Modern British Literature
  • Lowell Duckert - Ph.D. (George Washington University)
    Early Modern British Studies, Literature and Environment
  • John Jones - Ph.D. (University of Texas)
    Composition and Rhetoric, Digital literacy
  • Tom Sura - Ph.D. (Purdue University)
    Composition and Rhetoric, Writing Program Administration
  • Glenn Taylor - M.F.A. (Texas State University)
    Creative Writing: Fiction
  • Johanna Winant - Ph.D. (University of Chicago)
    Modern American poetry and poetics

Teaching Assistant Professors

  • Nancy Caronia - Ph.D. (University of Rhode Island)
    Contemporary British and American literature
  • Sarah Morris - Ph.D. (University of Maryland)
    human science phenomenology, embodiment, writing process, and student-centered teaching
  • Douglas Phillips - Ph.D. (Carnegie Mellon University)
    Professional and technical writing

Instructors

  • Jill Woods - M.A. (Eastern Michigan University)
    Business and technical writing

Professors Emeriti

  • Gail Galloway Adams
  • Dennis Allen
  • Rudolph Almasy
  • Patrick Conner
  • Ellesa High
  • Elizabeth Juckett
  • Byron Nelson
  • Carolyn Nelson
  • Kevin Oderman
  • Ethel Morgan Smith