Forestry

Degree Offered

  • Master of Science in Forestry with a major in Forestry.

Areas of Emphasis Offered

  • Forest Resources Management
  • Wood Science and Technology

Students seeking admission for the degree of master of science in forestry should have completed an undergraduate curriculum emphasizing forestry or wood science. A student whose undergraduate degree is in a field other than these two areas of study will ordinarily be required to take supplemental undergraduate courses. Candidates may emphasize study in bioenergy, biocomposites, forest biometry, forest ecology, forest economics, forest hydrology, forest management, forest operations, silviculture, sustainable construction, or forest products marketing. The candidate must complete thirty hours of approved study, six hours which shall constitute a thesis, or thirty-six hours of approved study without a thesis but including a three-hour problem paper. For details regarding the Forest Resources Management Program, go to: http://forestresources.wvu.edu/.  For details regarding the Wood Science and Technology Program, go to: http://woodscience.wvu.edu/.

A candidate for the M.S.F. degree in Forestry must meet all University, College, Division, and Program requirements as outlined in the WVU Graduate Catalog.

Program Requirements

All M.S.F. degree candidates are required to follow a planned program of study. The student develops the plan of study during their first year in the program in conjunction with the graduate committee. The plan must be approved by the Director of the Division and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the Davis College.

A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required in all courses applied toward degree requirements.
Course Requirements as determined by the Plan of Study *30
Total Hours30
*

Students must complete a minimum of 30 total hours, of which at least 24 hours must be coursework other than research, thesis, project, internship, etc. credits.

 

Candidates for the degree may emphasize in forest biometry, forest ecology, forest economics, forest business, forest management, forest hydrology, silviculture, wood science and technology, forest operations, wood composites, wood marketing, bio-energy, or bio-fuels. The candidate must complete thirty hours of approved study, six hours of which shall constitute a thesis. The program ordinarily requires two years of residence. The master of science in forestry has a non-thesis option. For this option, the candidate must complete thirty-six hours of approved study, eight hours of which shall consist of an applied problem as approved by the candidate's graduate committee. The Division of Forestry and Natural Resources in the Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design requires three letters of recommendation and a one-page goal statement which identifies the area of specialization the student desires to study.

Major Learning Goals

forestry

  • Demonstrate mastery in one of the areas of emphasis (Forest Resources Management or Wood Science and Technology)
  • Engage in and conduct original research in Forest Resources Management or Wood Science and Technology

Courses

FOR 525. Vegetation of West Virginia. 3 Hours.

PR: FOR 205. Basics of plant taxonomy and community ecology, use of technical field keys, study of selected plant families, field trips to unusual and/or important plant communities and forest types in West Virginia.

FOR 575. Forest Soils: Ecology and Management. 3 Hours.

PR: AGRN 410 or AGRN 425 or consent. Properties, nutrient cycling processes, and sustainable management of forest soils, with examples from the most important wood fiber producing regions of the U.S.: the southeast, Pacific Northwest, and the central hardwood forest.

FOR 590. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of forestry. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

FOR 591A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FOR 592. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

FOR 593A. Special Topics. 0-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FOR 594. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

FOR 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

FOR 650. Economics, Environment and Education in West Virginia. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for K-12 classroom teachers with little previous background in economics. We introduce the principles of economics using the WV forest products industry to provide examples.

FOR 670. Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management. 3 Hours.

PR: Grad standing. This course applies social science theory and methods to solving natural resource management problems.

FOR 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FOR 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

FOR 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

FOR 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

FOR 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

FOR 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

FOR 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FOR 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

FOR 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).