Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Resources

Degrees Offered

  • Master of Science with a major in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Resources 

The Division of Forestry and Natural Resources offers program options leading to the master of science for students who wish to major in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Resources. Students selecting this graduate program may focus on field-related specialties including (but not limited to) recreation management and policy, environmental interpretation, and natural resource-based tourism. All students are required to complete a total of thirty-five credit hours and complete a thesis.

Students seeking admission for the degree of Master of Science in recreation, parks, and tourism resources should have completed an undergraduate curriculum emphasizing natural resources recreation. A student whose undergraduate degree is in a field other than this discipline will ordinarily be required to take supplemental undergraduate courses as part of their degree work. Students selecting this graduate program may emphasize recreation management and policy, environmental education and interpretation, or natural resource-based tourism.  All students are required to complete a total of thirty-five credit hours and complete a thesis.  For more information, go to: http://recreation.wvu.edu/.

A candidate for the M.S. degree in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism must meet all University, College, Division, and Program requirements as outlined in the WVU Graduate Catalog.

Program Requirements

All M.S. degree candidates are required to follow a planned program of study. The student develops the plan of study during their first year in the program in conjunction with the graduate committee. The plan must be approved by the Director of the Division and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the Davis College.

A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required in all courses applied toward degree requirements.
Research Methods and Statistics courses8
Problems in Forestry, Wood Science, Wildlife, or Recreation
Statistical Methods 1
Statistical Methods 1
Graduate Seminar (taken twice)
Recreation, Parks, & Tourism Resources courses (take 4 classes from the following list)12
Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management
Outdoor Recreation Behavior
Non-Personal Interpretation
Personal Interpretation
Tourism Planning
Tourism and Natural Resources Marketing
Special Topics
Cognate Area12
Four courses in a chosen cognate area
(AGEE, EDP, FOR, RPTR, RESM, FMAN at 400-level and above)
FOR 698Thesis or Dissertation3
Total Hours35

A thesis requires collecting a qualitative or quantitative data set for the purpose of conducting action-oriented research (e.g., program or needs assessments), cooperative research (e.g, cooperative problem solving), and/or theory development (e.g., hypothesis testing). The specific requirements for each student are determined by the thesis chair and committee members. This program ordinarily requires two years of residence.

Major Learning Goals

recreation, parks, and tourism resources

  1. Students will be able to apply a broad range of social science theories and methods to policy, planning, and management challenges and opportunities in the recreation, tourism, and natural resource fields.
  2. Students will be able to design and conduct field relevant research to address natural resource based recreation and tourism questions and problems.
  3. Students will be able to analyze and interpret research data that addresses natural resource based recreation and tourism questions and problems.
  4. Students will communicate effectively in writing and oral presentations to professional and lay audiences about issues in the RPTR field.
  5. Students will demonstrate the ability to remain current with contemporary issues within one's field and related areas.

Courses

RPTR 570. Meanings of Place. 3 Hours.

Study of place as a psychological and social phenomenon with implications for community development, historic preservation, interpretation design, management, natural and cultural sustainability, and human well-being. (Equivalent to LARC 570.).

RPTR 608. Recreation and Park Management Practicum. 2-4 Hours.

PR: Consent. Field experience and conference in the study, analysis, and solution of management problems in private, commercial and governmental recreation and park organizations.

RPTR 680. Non-Personal Interpretation. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the theoretical underpinnings and application of non-personal communication methods. This is a project-based course about interpreting historical, cultural, and natural resources.

RPTR 685. Personal Interpretation. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the theoretical underpinnings and applications of personal communication methods. This is a project-based course about interpreting historical, cultural, and natural resources.

RPTR 691A-M. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RPTR 693A-D. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

RPTR 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading will be S/U.).

RPTR 714. Outdoor Recreation Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course explores the biophysical, psychological, social psychological, and sociological constructs that contribute to a contemporary, interdisciplinary understanding of outdoor recreation behavior. These concepts will be related to recreation resource management.

RPTR 715. Leisure and Recreation. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Study of leisure as a social phenomenon and its implications for recreation.

RPTR 718. Participatory Approaches Natural Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This seminar style class focuses on the adoption of more participatory approaches to managing natural resources. Specific topics will include the use of advisory committees, mediating conflicts, facilitation skills, management partnerships and public participation plans.

RPTR 738. Tourism Planning. 3 Hours.

Use of natural settings; integration of tourism development with respect to environmental protection concerns. (Field trip required; some transportation and food costs.).

RPTR 752. Tourism and Natural Resources Marketing. 3 Hours.

Apply the principles of marketing to tourism and natural resources emphasizing the convergence of increasing tourism demand and destination/resource competitiveness and sustainability.

RPTR 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of recreation, parks, and tourism resources. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading may be S/U.).

RPTR 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RPTR 792A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

RPTR 793A-Z. . 1-6 Hours.

RPTR 794. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

RPTR 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

RPTR 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

RPTR 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

RPTR 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of students reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

RPTR 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.