Natural Resource Economics

http://resourceeconomics.wvu.edu

Alan R. Collins, Graduate Program Coordinator
e-mail: Alan.Collins@mail.wvu.edu

Degrees Offered

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Natural Resource Economics

The Ph.D. degree is the most advanced degree offered and prepares candidates for work at the highest level of the profession as a faculty member, staff in a research organization or governmental and non-governmental agencies, or as a consultant.

A candidate for the Ph.D. degree in Natural Resource Economics must meet all University, College, Division, and Program requirements as outlined in the WVU Graduate catalog.

Program Requirements

The requirements for obtaining a Ph.D. degree in Natural Resource Economics are outlined in the graduate handbook available on-line at http://resourcemanagement.wvu.edu/.  All Ph.D. degree candidates are required to follow a planned program of study. The student develops this plan of study in conjunction with the graduate committee. The plan must be approved by the Director of the Division and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the Davis College.

Required Courses
ARE 621Quantitative Methods in Resource Economics3
ECON 701Advanced Micro-Economic Theory 14
ECON 711Advanced Micro-Economic Theory 24
ECON 721Mathematical Economics3
ECON 725Econometrics 13
ARE 703Advanced Natural Resource Economic Theory3
ARE 710Advanced Environmental Economics3
ECON 726Econometrics 23
ECON 727Econometrics 33
or ARE 729 Spatial Econometrics
Required Field (select one of the following):6
Economic Development and Regional Economics
Rural and Regional Development
International Agricultural Economic Development
International Trade
Comparative Economic Systems
Advanced Regional Economics
Advanced Urban Economics
Spatial Economic Analysis
Spatial Econometrics
Econometrics 3
Advanced Regional Economics
Spatial Analysis for Resource Management
Macroeconomics
Advanced Macro-Economic Theory 1
Advanced Macro-Economic Theory 2
Seminar1
Graduate Seminar
Research1
Research
Teaching Practicum1
Teaching Practicum
Qualifying Exam
Mentored Research Paper
Dissertation Proposal Defense
Dissertation
Total Hours38

Major Learning Outcomes

natural resource economics

Learning outcomes for this degree program are that each graduate:

  • Demonstrate the capacity to produce economic research that can be accepted for publication in leading academic journals.
  • Be proficient in oral and written communication.  

Agriculture & Resource Econ Courses

ARE 540. Rural and Regional Development. 3 Hours.

PR: ARE 300 and ARE 321. Economic theories and quantitative techniques. Problems and goals for rural and regional planning; methods of policy analysis for community infrastructure development.

ARE 542. International Agricultural Economic Development. 3 Hours.

Current problems, theories, policies, and strategies in planning for agricultural and rural development for increased food production and to improve the well-being of rural people in the developing countries of the world.

ARE 580. Energy Industry Economics. 3 Hours.

PR: Graduate standing. Technical production and consumption methodologies, environmental concerns, and national and global economics and politics in making energy decisions.

ARE 581. Resource Appraisal and Decision Making. 3 Hours.

PR: ARE 500 or equivalent. Investment analysis, decision making under risk and uncertainty, and project analysis applied to resource exploration and utilization; mineral and energy reserve and resource estimation techniques.

ARE 591A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced topics that are not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ARE 592A-Z. . 1-6 Hours.

ARE 593A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

ARE 594A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

ARE 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty-supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

ARE 600. Research Methods. 1 Hour.

Research methods in agricultural, environmental, and resource economics. The application of scientific thinking in developing research proposals and critiquing published research.

ARE 601. Applied Microeconomics. 4 Hours.

PR: ARE 401 or equiv. Consumer and production economics applied to resource, environmental, and agricultural analysis.

ARE 621. Quantitative Methods in Resource Economics. 3 Hours.

PR: ARE 601 and ECON 421 or equivalents. Optimization techniques in economic analysis of natural resources; environmental and agricultural management problems; linear, nonlinear, and dynamic programming.

ARE 624. Econometric Methods in Resource Economics. 3 Hours.

PR: ECON 425. Application methods to natural resource, environmental, and agricultural economic problems; single and simultaneous equation models, specification problems, topics in time series, and cross-sectional analysis.

ARE 632. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics. 3 Hours.

PR: ARE 600 and ARE 621 or equivalent. Theory and institutions; market failure, externalities and property rights issues; renewable and nonrenewable resources, common property, environmental and resource management, and intergenerational decisions.

ARE 633. Natural Resource Policy Analysis. 3 Hours.

PR: ARE 600 and ARE 621, or equiv. Welfare economics applied to the analysis and evaluation of natural resources, environmental, agricultural, and energy policy issues.

ARE 643. Project Analysis and Evaluation. 4 Hours.

Analysis and evaluation of investment projects; economic and financial aspects of project analysis; risk analysis; preparation of feasibility reports.

ARE 644. International Markets and Trade. 3 Hours.

PR: ARE 600 and ARE 621. Causes and consequences of international trade and investment; commodity market structures, commodity price instability and international agreements; trade barriers and protection, export promotion, and impacts on developing countries.

ARE 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of agriculture research economics. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

ARE 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ARE 692A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

ARE 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

ARE 694A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

ARE 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

ARE 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

ARE 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

ARE 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

ARE 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

ARE 703. Advanced Natural Resource Economic Theory. 3 Hours.

PR: ECON 710 and ARE 632. Allocation and distribution of natural resources in static and dynamic contexts; welfare economics, cost-benefit analysis, and optimal control approaches; applications to resource valuation, exhaustion, taxation, and regulation in theory and practice.

ARE 710. Advanced Environmental Economics. 3 Hours.

PR: ECON 701 and ARE 632 or Consent. Theory, efficient environmental design and analysis, modeling of economic and environmental systems, evaluation of non-market benefits and costs, and risk assessment.

ARE 729. Spatial Econometrics. 3 Hours.

Explores the various types of spatial econometric models and how they are estimated and interpreted. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian methodologies will be demonstrated both mathematically and in an applied setting.

ARE 735. Resources of Development Planning. 3 Hours.

ARE 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Supervised practice in college teaching of agriculture. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

ARE 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced topics that are not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ARE 792A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

ARE 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

ARE 794A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

ARE 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

ARE 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate students will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

ARE 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis (697), problem report (697), research paper or equivalent scholarly project (697), or a dissertation (797). Grading may be S/U.

ARE 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision is needed during the writing of student reports (698). theses (698), or dissertations (798). (Grading is Normal.).

ARE 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium, to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is Normal; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

Resource Management Courses

RESM 540. Geospatial Modeling. 3 Hours.

There are two goals for this course: to present the fundamental methods for analyzing spatial data statistically, and to demonstrate spatial model building implementation and analysis. A prior statistics or econometric course is recommended.

RESM 545. Spatial Hydrology and Watershed Analysis. 3 Hours.

PR: RESM 440. Introduction to applied spatial hydrology using GIS; integrates statistical modeling and terrain analysis; provides insights into water quality and quantity analysis for local and regional watershed scales. (Credit cannot be received for both RESM 445 and RESM 545.).

RESM 560. Advanced Energy Project and Program Management. 3 Hours.

This course builds around the concepts and best practices required to manage, coordinate and provide effective leadership for multi-dimensional programs and projects in the energy and environmental resource industries.

RESM 575. Spatial Analysis for Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course develops and applies advanced Geography Information System (GIS) and spatial analysis skills for natural resource and environmental management. (Previous GIS experience helpful.).

RESM 585. GIS and Spatial Analysis Project. 3 Hours.

PR: RESM 440 or GEOG 350 or consent. Provides an opportunity for students to pursue a research interest in the spatial sciences with development of an applied spatial project and paper. Guidance and direction will be provided to assure relevant integration of the geospatial techniques to address the problem addressed.

RESM 591A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RESM 592. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading and/or research.

RESM 593A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

RESM 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

RESM 640. Geographic Information Systems for Aquatic Resource Management. 3 Hours.

Using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze the special componnents of a stream, river, or large water body for aquatic resource management and habitat assessment.

RESM 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in the college teaching of resource management. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

RESM 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RESM 692. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading and/or research.

RESM 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

RESM 694. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

RESM 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

RESM 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

RESM 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

RESM 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

RESM 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking course work credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

RESM 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Supervised practice in college teaching of agriculture. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

RESM 793. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

RESM 794. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

RESM 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty Supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

RESM 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each Graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

RESM 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis (697), problem report (697), research paper or equivalent scholarly project (697), or a dissertation (797). Grading may be S/U.