Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm. D.)

Interprofessional Education Opportunities

Program Information

Area of Emphasis in ADVANCED CLINICAL Practice

The Advanced Clinical Practice Area of Emphasis (AoE) is designed to enhance the preparation and competitiveness of Doctor of Pharmacy students applying for a PGY-1 residency.  The AoE focuses on providing didactic and experiential education, as well as one-on-one mentorship, to allow students to understand and appreciate the nuances of clinical pharmacy practice.  This track will offer a road map for students to be successful in critical areas including scholarship experience, organizational involvement, experiential education, and additional basic tools for navigating the application and interview process.  The experiences provided in the AoE will provide students with a strong core foundation upon which further training in a residency program can expand upon.  More information can be found on the School's web page at http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu/student-services/description-of-the-professional-program/areas-of-emphasiscertificate-program/.

Area of Emphasis in college teaching in pharmacY

This area of emphasis program helps to prepare student pharmacists for teaching at the college level. The program combines courses and expertise at the university level with those at the School of Pharmacy to provide a broad range of knowledge and experience in pedagogy training, diversity issues in higher education, current issues in academic pharmacy education, and mentored teaching experience. Together, the program components will develop students’ ability to design and teach their own courses while implementing effective classroom techniques and assessment. By completing the area of emphasis, students will be more competitive for residency and fellowship programs with an emphasis in teaching and will also be prepared to participate in college teaching as an adjunct pharmacy instructor or preceptor.  More information can be found on the School's web page at http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu/student-services/description-of-the-professional-program/areas-of-emphasiscertificate-program/.

Area of Emphasis in GERIATRIC PHARMACY

This area of emphasis program offers students pursuing the Doctor of Pharmacy degree the opportunity to explore the basic biological, psychological, sociological and medical processes of aging, the needs and experiences of older people, and the impact of social policies related to human aging.  An understanding of the unique experiences and needs of older adults in Appalachia and other rural areas is emphasized.  More information can be found on the School's web page at http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu/student-services/description-of-the-professional-program/areas-of-emphasiscertificate-program/.

Area of Emphasis in Global Health (For PHARMacy)

The area of emphasis program in global health trains students to be able to provide patient-centered care at home and abroad.  Its focus is on providing both didactic and experiential education that will allow students to have an understanding and an appreciation for the global nature of healthcare and how pharmacy practice can impact individuals worldwide.  More information can be found on the School's web page at http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu/student-services/description-of-the-professional-program/areas-of-emphasiscertificate-program/.

Area of Emphasis in Translational pharmacy Research

The Area of Emphasis (AoE) in Translational Pharmacy Research will allow students to understand and recognize the importance of and participate in translational research (e.g., how basic sciences contributions are applied in improving the quality of patients’ health, how observations in the clinic direct new scientific hypotheses, and how health services and outcomes research impacts access, cost, quality and outcomes of health care). Participants conduct original research under the mentorship of a faculty member.  More information can be found at http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu/student-services/description-of-the-professional-program/areas-of-emphasiscertificate-program/.

DUAL Pharm.D./Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)

The dual Pharm.D./Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program provides outstanding career opportunities for graduates by building expertise in business administration principles and managerial practices coupled with therapeutic knowledge and expertise in medication management. The goal of the dual degree program is to prepare the next generation of leaders, managers, and administrators for rewarding careers in health care or pharmaceutical organizations. Opportunities for the dual degree graduates include leadership positions in hospitals and health systems, pharmacy benefit management companies, government organizations, the pharmaceutical industry, chain pharmacy corporations, and owning, franchising, or operating an independent pharmacy. Through a well-coordinated plan of study in both degree programs, the dual Pharm.D./M.B.A. degree students will be able to obtain two nationally-accredited graduate degrees - M.B.A. and Pharm.D. degrees - during the course of the 4-year Pharm.D. program. Additional information, including the plan of study, can be found at http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu/studentservices/description-of-the-professional-program/pharmdmba-program.

Academic and Technical Standards

In accordance with section 504 of the Rehabilitative Act of 1973 (PL 93-112), and incorporating the guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA PL 101-336) enacted by Congress in 1990, the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy has adopted minimal technical standards for the assessment of admission, scholastic advancement, and graduation for its professional degree (Doctor of Pharmacy) program.

Because the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree signifies that the holder is a pharmacist prepared for entry into the practice of pharmacy, it follows that graduates must have the knowledge, skills, and demeanor to function in a broad variety of clinical situations and to conduct a wide spectrum of pharmaceutical care activities.

Candidates for admission into, progression through, and graduation from the Pharm.D. program must have the functional use of the senses of vision and hearing. Candidates’ pharmaceutical skills will also be lessened without the functional use of the senses of equilibrium, smell, and taste. Additionally, they must have sufficient motor function to permit them to carry out the activities described in the sections that follow. They must be able to consistently, quickly, and accurately integrate all information received by whatever sense(s) employed, and they must have the intellectual ability to learn, integrate, analyze, and synthesize data.

A candidate for the Pharm.D. degree must have abilities and skills of five varieties including:

  • Observation
  • Communication
  • Motor
  • Conceptual, integrative, and quantitative
  • Behavioral and social

Technological compensation can be made for some handicaps in certain of these areas, but a candidate should be able to perform in a reasonably independent manner. The use of a trained intermediary means that a candidate’s judgment must be mediated by someone else’s power of selection and observation. For details, see the Technical Standards document published online at http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu/studentservices/description-of-the-professional-program.

Student Course Load

Students in the Doctor of Pharmacy program are expected to register for all required classes in a semester unless directed not to do so by the Committee on Academic and Professional Standards or the Office of Student Services. Full-time students in the School of Pharmacy may not register for less than nine credit hours during any semester without written approval of the Committee on Academic and Professional Standards or the Office of Student Services. For an exception, a letter of petition must be submitted to the Committee on Academic and Professional Standards through the School of Pharmacy’s Office of Student Services.

Promotion and Graduation Requirements

Evaluation of Student Progress

Promotion of a student in the Doctor of Pharmacy program is evaluated in two major areas: successful completion of all required work and appropriate adherence to the professional standards of the School of Pharmacy.

The following information is only a brief outline of the School of Pharmacy policies and procedures. Detailed requirements and policies for evaluation of student progress and graduation can be found in the Policy on Academic and Professional Standards Governing the Doctor of Pharmacy Degree Program at West Virginia University School of Pharmacy and may be viewed on the School of Pharmacy website. Copies are available at the Office of Student Services. The Committee on Academic and Professional Standards administers all promotion and academic penalty rules.

Academic Coursework Review

The Committee on Academic and Professional Standards of the School of Pharmacy reviews the performance of each student in every course at the end of each academic period and makes recommendations to the dean.

If a student has been found to have a marginal performance in any course as indicated by a grade less than a C or a semester GPA less than 2.5, probation will be recommended. Students on probation are not eligible to hold office in student organizations or receive School of Pharmacy scholarships. Students on probation are expected to be present for all of their classes and laboratories. If a student fails to complete any required remedial actions or meet the specified performance requirements during the probationary period, academic suspension or dismissal may be recommended.

If a student has been found to have an unsatisfactory performance as indicated by a grade of F in any course, or an accumulation of narrative evaluations that indicate an academic deficiency or inadequate integration of curricular content, suspension or dismissal from the School may be recommended. In selected circumstances, the committee may recommend remedial work or repetition of all or a portion of the curriculum. Exceptions may be made only on recommendation of the committee.

After academic dismissal, a student may apply for readmission to the School of Pharmacy. Readmission of a student is the prerogative of the dean following a recommendation by the Committee on Academic and Professional Standards.

Grading Policy

Courses in the Doctor of Pharmacy degree program are graded either as A (excellent), B (good), C (fair),  F (failing), I (incomplete), or on a (P) pass/(F) fail basis. Grades may be accompanied by a narrative report on the student’s progress, noting any factors requiring remedial work or counseling. It is customary that all experiential courses are accompanied by a narrative evaluation. Narrative evaluations are kept in the student’s file in the Office of Student Services.

The grade of incomplete (I) is given when the instructor believes that the work is unavoidably incomplete. If the grade of I is not removed by the satisfactory completion of the work before the end of the next semester in which the student is in residence, it becomes a failure (F) unless special permission to postpone the work is obtained from the Committee on Academic and Professional Standards. It is the responsibility of the student to consult the instructor about the means and schedule for completing incomplete courses. A contract specifying what work must be completed and when should be drawn up by the instructor and signed by the instructor and student.

Professional Standards Review

In view of public and professional responsibilities, the faculty of each of the professional schools of WVU has the authority to recommend to the president of the University the removal of any student from its rolls whenever, by formal decision reduced to writing, the faculty finds that the student is unfit to meet the qualifications and responsibilities of the profession. Further information is provided in The Policy on Academic and Professional Standards Governing the Doctor of Pharmacy Degree at West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, which is available at the School of Pharmacy Office of Student Services.

Special Requirements

The Board of Pharmacy requires 1,500 clock hours of internship experience for licensure in West Virginia. Students are required to obtain an Intern Certificate from the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy in order to accrue intern hours. Any hours worked before becoming a registered intern will not apply toward meeting the WV board requirements. Students must have a valid Intern Certificate throughout their entire experiential years of the Pharm.D. program. The certificate must be maintained until completion of the entire internship. The Board of Pharmacy holds final authority over internship rules and regulations. Up to 800 hours of the total of 1,500 required by the WV Board of Pharmacy may be obtained via the WVU School of Pharmacy experiential program.

Students in the Pharm.D. program will perform one four-week experiential rotation at the conclusion of the first year and a two-week experiential rotation at the conclusion of the second year of the professional curriculum and eight five-week rotations during the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) year of the program. Two of the eight blocks performed in the fourth year of the curriculum must be performed in designated rural sites. Site placement and sequencing will occur in the semesters prior to the experiential activities. Students may incur additional housing and/or travel costs when taking part in the experiential rotations. Opportunity will be provided for students to prioritize their site selection; however, ultimate authority for site selection will be maintained by the School of Pharmacy. All didactic coursework (required and elective) must be successfully completed prior to beginning the fourth-year APPE experiential rotations.

Legal Requirements

To qualify for examination for licensure by the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy, information can be found at http://www.wvbop.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=52&Itemid=82.

Interns must be registered with the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy and must be enrolled in or a graduate of an accredited school of pharmacy to gain experience acceptable for the internship requirement. Details may be obtained from the Office of Student Services.

Course Exemptions

A student who seeks exemption from one or more professional courses based upon previous academic experience must submit a written petition to the Committee on Academic and Professional Standards. Only courses taken through an accredited school of pharmacy or medicine will be considered for possible substitution.

Pharm.D. Admissions

Admissions are competitive. Criteria used to evaluate candidates include academic performance, as measured by the grade point averages (GPA) for all the above-noted prerequisite courses and the cumulative GPA achieved in all prior college-level coursework, Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) scores (including a written essay), a personal interview, and letters of recommendation. Prerequisite courses may be taken at an accredited U.S. or foreign institution of higher education and completed with a grade of C or better. Careful consideration is given to those personal qualifications which bear upon the fitness of applicants for the study and practice of the profession of pharmacy.

All applicants must first file an initial electronic application with the Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS). Instructions for completing the application are found on the PharmCAS website: http://www.pharmcas.org/. Application deadlines are subject to change; check PharmCAS, the School of Pharmacy website at http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu or contact the School to verify current deadlines. Supplemental applications specific to the WVU School of Pharmacy will then be sent to selected candidates deemed qualified by the Committee on Admissions. A $50 fee must accompany the supplemental application.

Each applicant who is recommended for acceptance is required to pay a deposit of $500 before his or her name is added to the official list of those accepted by the School of Pharmacy. If the applicant enrolls, this sum is applied to the first-semester tuition. If the applicant fails to enroll, this deposit is forfeited.

With enrollment in the School of Pharmacy, all students must comply with the immunization and diagnostic procedures required by the WVU Board of Governors, WVU, the WVU Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, and the School of Pharmacy.

Complete information may be obtained from:

School of Pharmacy Office of Student Services 
WVU Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center 
P.O. Box 9500 
Morgantown, WV 26506-9500
 

Pharmacy College Admission Test

Completion of the Pharmacy College Admission Test is a requirement for admission to the School. It is recommended that the student take this test in the summer or fall before making application for admission. Information concerning time and place of the test can be obtained from the School of Pharmacy, or by NCS Pearson, Inc. 

PCAT Customer Relations 
19500 Bulverde Road 
San Antonio, TX 78259 
1-800-622-3231 or (210) 339-8710 
Fax 1-800-727-0811 or 1-800-999-5941 
or http://www.PCATweb.info


Personal Interview

The Committee on Admissions requires a personal interview with selected candidates who qualify for a supplemental application. The Committee on Admissions will determine which applicants are to receive the supplemental application. Interviews are held during the fall and spring semester at the WVU Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center in Morgantown.

Recommendations on Academic Performance 

A total of three recommendations are required. Two academic recommendations are required and must be provided by course instructors in any two of the pre-pharmacy course requirements. The third recommendation may be provided by a variety of individuals. Please refer to the PharmCAS website for more detailed information.

Early Decision

The Early Decision program is a binding option for applicants who have decided that West Virginia University is the degree program of their first choice and that they will enroll if accepted. As an Early Decision applicant, you can apply to only one pharmacy degree program.

The Early Decision application deadline is typically the first of September. In addition to completing the PharmCAS application, you must arrange for PharmCAS to receive all of your official transcripts and fee by the September deadline. If your application, transcripts, or fee arrives after the deadline, PharmCAS will automatically change your file from early decision status to regular status.

You may be offered early admission, denied admission, or deferred to regular applicant status. If you are offered admission as an Early Decision applicant, you are obligated to accept the offer and you will not be permitted to apply to other PharmCAS institutions. If, however, you are denied admission as an Early Decision applicant, you may apply to other PharmCAS institutions for an additional fee. Refer to the PharmCAS application fee schedule to determine the cost to apply to each additional program. PharmCAS institutions will make admission decisions on early decision applicants by mid October.

Admission to Advanced Standing for Transfer Students

If space is available, students from other accredited schools of pharmacy may be admitted, provided they meet the prerequisite course requirements of the WVU School of Pharmacy, have at least a 2.5 professional grade point average, are in good academic and professional standing at the school of origin, and are eligible for continuation toward a degree in pharmacy at the school initially attended. Grades of D in professional courses cannot be transferred.

Provisional Admission

An applicant accepted into the first year, or an advanced standing transfer student, is expected to have met all entrance requirements and satisfactorily completed all pre-pharmacy coursework in progress prior to matriculation. A satisfactory performance in the completion of such coursework is defined as one that is consistent with the student’s previous academic record and must include no grades of D or lower in prerequisite courses. While it is preferred that all prerequisite coursework be completed by the end of the spring term prior to matriculation, it is possible to complete up to two non-sequential prerequisite courses before the start of pharmacy student orientation in the fall semester of matriculation. Failure to do so will result in revocation of the acceptance by the Admissions Committee.

Admitted students must remain free of any violations of local, state, or federal law that would prohibit their ability to obtain an intern license from the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy.

Furnishing or causing to furnish false or incorrect information for the purpose of gaining admission to the School of Pharmacy constitutes grounds for disciplinary action including, but not limited to, expulsion or revocation of acceptance.

Students in the School of Pharmacy agree to abide by the provisions of the Student Code of Academic and Professional Integrity. Upon admission, each student is required to return a signed statement to the Office of Student Services indicating the student has read and understands the Policy on Academic and Professional Standards and the Student Code of Academic and Professional Integrity of the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy. The code and copies of the statement are available in the Office of Student Services in the School of Pharmacy, and on the School of Pharmacy website.

Academic and Technical Standards and Policies

http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu/student-services/description-of-the-professional-program/

General Education FOUNDATIONS

Please use this link to view a list of courses that meet each GEF requirement.

NOTE: Some major requirements will fulfill specific GEF requirements. Please see the curriculum requirements listed below for details on which GEFs you will need to select.

General Education Foundations
F1 - Composition & Rhetoric3-6
Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric
and Composition, Rhetoric, and Research
Accelerated Academic Writing
F2A/F2B - Science & Technology4-6
F3 - Math & Quantitative Skills3-4
F4 - Society & Connections3
F5 - Human Inquiry & the Past3
F6 - The Arts & Creativity3
F7 - Global Studies & Diversity3
F8 - Focus (may be satisfied by completion of a minor, double major, or dual degree)9
Total Hours31-37

Please note that not all of the GEF courses are offered at all campuses. Students should consult with their advisor or academic department regarding the GEF course offerings available at their campus.

Degree Requirements

The awarding of a doctor of pharmacy degree to a student is approved by the dean of the School of Pharmacy after receipt of recommendations from the Academic and Professional Standards Committee. Candidates must meet the following criteria:

  1. Meet the academic and professional standards, criteria, and requirements outlined in The Policy on Academic and Professional Standards Governing the Doctor of Pharmacy Degree at West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, which is available at the School of Pharmacy Office of Student Services and on the school’s website
  2. Satisfactorily complete all of the required coursework in a timely fashion, which may not exceed five years from the date of initial enrollment into the professional program
  3. Pay all fees
  4. Complete the last year’s work in residence in this school
  5. Satisfactorily complete the required number of experiential rotations and demonstrate the attainment of minimum competencies
  6. Complete 100 hours of volunteer community service

Curriculum Requirements

Pre-Pharmacy Requirements

Biochemistry Requirement
Select one of the following:3
Introductory Biochemistry
Introduction to Biochemistry
Select one of the following BIOL 115 preferred - (May fulfill GEF 2): *4
Principles of Biology *
General Biology
and General Biology
and General Biology Laboratory
and General Biology Laboratory
BIOL 117Introductory Physiology (May fulfill GEF 8)4
CHEM 115Fundamentals of Chemistry (May fulfill GEF 8)4
PSIO 241Elementary Physiology4
or BIOL 235 Human Physiology
CHEM 116Fundamentals of Chemistry (May fulfill GEF 8)4
CHEM 233
CHEM 235
Organic Chemistry
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
4
CHEM 234
CHEM 236
Organic Chemistry
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
4
ECON 201Principles of Microeconomics (May fulfill GEF 4)3
ENGL 101Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric (May fulfill GEF 1)3
ENGL 102Composition, Rhetoric, and Research (May fulfill GEF 1)3
Math Requirement
Select one of the following (May fulfill GEF 3):3
Applied Calculus
Calculus 1a with Precalculus
and Calculus 1b with Precalculus
Calculus 1
Microbiology Requirement
Select one of the following:3
General Microbiology
Environmental Microbiology
Medical Microbiology
CSAD 270Effective Public Speaking3
STAT 211Elementary Statistical Inference3
or ECON 225 Elementary Business and Economics Statistics
WVUE 191First Year Seminar (or equivalent)1
General Education Foundations
GEF Requirements 5, 6, 79
Total Hours62
*

 BIOL 101, 102, 103, and 104 are equivalent to BIOL 115.

Pharmacy Requirements

NBAN 301Principles of Human Anatomy3
PSIO 743Fundamentals of Physiology5
Community Rotation Requirement4
Intro Community Rotation
PHAR 822Service Learning Practice Experience 11
PHAR 832Service Learning Practice Experience 21
Intro to Institutional Rotation (repeated for a total of 2 credit hours)2
Intro Institutional Rotation
PHAR 859Pharmacy Law and Ethics3
PHAR 760Acute Care Rotation 15
Select 1 of the following:5
Acute Care Rotation 2
Ambulatory Care Rotation 2
PHAR 762Ambulatory Care Rotation 15
PHAR 764Elective Rotation 15
PHAR 765Elective Rotation 25
PHAR 766Selective Rotations5
PHAR 770Community Rotation5
PHAR 772Institutional Rotation5
Current Topics Requirement2
PHAR 860
Current Topics in Pharmacy
PHAR 800Pharmacy Practice and Management 14
PHAR 801Drug Delivery5
PHAR 802Preparation of Pharmaceutical Products2
PHAR 810Pharmacy Practice and Management 24
PHAR 811Foundational Pharmacy Skills1
PHAR 812Drug Chemistry and Biotechnology3
PHAR 813Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacogenomics4
PHAR 814Biochemical Pharmacology4
PHAR 815Self-Care3
PHAR 820Pharmacy Practice and Management 33
PHAR 823Pulmonology3
PHAR 824Cardiology5
PHAR 825Nephrology2
PHAR 826Evidence-Based Practice3
PHAR 830Pharmacy Practice and Management 43
PHAR 833Endocrinology3
PHAR 834Immunology3
PHAR 835Rheumatology and Pain2
PHAR 836Research in the Pharmaceutical Sciences (Research in the Pharm Sciences)3
PHAR 840Pharmacy Practice and Management 53
PHAR 843Gastroenterology and Nutrition3
PHAR 844Infectious Diseases3
PHAR 845Neurology and Psychiatry4
PHAR 848Acute Care Practice Experience2
PHAR 849Ambulatory Care Practice Experience2
PHAR 853Hematology/Oncology (Hematology/Oncology)4
PHAR 854Special Populations (Special Populations)3
PHAR 858Comprehensive Assessment of Practice (Comp Assessment of Practice)3
Electives (only approved professionally related courses)8
Total Hours156

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
NBAN 3013PHAR 8104PHAR 8181
PSIO 7435PHAR 8111 
PHAR 8004PHAR 8123 
PHAR 8015PHAR 8134 
PHAR 8022PHAR 8144 
 PHAR 8153 
 PHAR 8183 
 19 22 1
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
PHAR 8203PHAR 8321PHAR 8381
PHAR 8221PHAR 8303 
PHAR 8233PHAR 8333 
PHAR 8245PHAR 8343 
PHAR 8252PHAR 8352 
PHAR 8263PHAR 8363 
Elective 2PHAR 8381 
 Elective2 
 19 18 1
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
PHAR 8403PHAR 8593Complete 2 rotations from the following:10
PHAR 8433PHAR 8534 
PHAR 8443PHAR 8543 
PHAR 8454PHAR 8583 
Select 1 of the following:2Select course not yet completed:2 
   
   
Elective2Elective2 
   
   
 17 17 10
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours 
PHAR 8601PHAR 8601 
Complete 3 rotations from the following of those not yet completed:*15Complete 3 rotations from the following of those not yet completed:15 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 16 16
Total credit hours: 156
*

Prior to beginning the experiential rotations, each student enrolled in the School of Pharmacy professional program must complete a minimum of eight credit hours of school of pharmacy elective courses or courses from a list of approved professionally-related electives as part of the pharmacy curriculum. Electives must be completed during the first three years of the four-year professional program. No course taken prior to admission into the School of Pharmacy may be used nor repeated to meet the elective requirements of the professional curriculum, and no reduction in elective requirements will be allowed for courses completed or degrees earned prior to enrollment in the program.

Areas of Emphasis Offered:

Advanced Clinical Practice Area of Emphasis Requirements

Required Course for this AoE:
PHAR 776Preparing Residency Applicants2
Select 2 courses from the following:4
Advocacy and Leadership
Teach to Learn: Learn to Teach
Pediatric Pharmacotherapy
Critical Care Pharmacotherapy
Acute Care Case Studies
Geriatrics
Travel Medicine and Global Pharmacy Practice
Special Topics (Drug-Induced Diseases)
Total Hours6

Additional Requirements

Mentorship Program:

  • Each student will be assigned a faculty mentor and meet regularly to discuss career goals, progression through the program, curriculum vitae development, and other issues that arise.
  • In addition, the AoE coordinator(s) will meet with the students as a group at least twice a semester to discuss global issues and professional development topics.

Research Project:

  • Each student must complete some type of scholarly project that is presented for dissemination in some venue.  This can be a research project presented as a poster at a national meeting, a review article published in a peer-reviewed journal, a patient case series presented at the local WVU HSC research day, or any number of other options. 

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) Rotations:

  • As part of the advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), students will be required to complete an approved plan of study, which will include at least four direct patient care rotations, as well as a drug information equivalent rotation (such as a drug information center rotation or poison center rotation). 
  • All student APPE schedules must comply with Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards.

College Teaching in Pharmacy Area of Emphasis

The area of emphasis has four major requirements: a higher education pedagogy course; a higher education diversity course; pharmacy-specific coursework; and a pharmacy teaching experience.

Eligibility and Deadlines:

Students must be currently enrolled in the Doctor of Pharmacy program and in good academic standing. Up to five students will be enrolled per year. Students will complete an application for admission to the area of emphasis program, including the following elements:

1) a cover letter

2) an essay describing the applicant’s future career goals and what he or she expects to gain through completion of the Area of Emphasis

3) a current curriculum vitae

4) an unofficial transcript will be accessed through the WVU School of Pharmacy, Office of Student Services

Required Courses
PHAR 743Teach to Learn: Learn to Teach2
PHAR 744Education Journal Club1
C&I 789Teaching in Higher Education3
or GRAD 710 Scholarly Teaching
HIED 693Special Topics (Women and Gender Issues in Higher Education)3
or HIED 750 Diversity Issues in Higher Education
Required Teaching Experience - Select one of the following:1-5
Elective Rotation 1
Elective Rotation 2
Teaching Practicum
Total Hours10

Geriatric Pharmacy Area of Emphasis

Eligibility and Deadlines:

Students must be currently enrolled in the Doctor of Pharmacy program and in good academic standing. Students will complete an application for admission to the area of emphasis program, including the following elements:

1) a cover letter

2) an essay describing the applicant’s future career goals and what he or she expects to gain through completion of the Area of Emphasis

3) a current Curriculum Vitae

4) an unofficial transcript will be accessed through the Office of Student Services.

PHAR 751Geriatrics2
GERO 645Fundamentals of Gerontology3
GERO 681Rural Gerontology3
Students must choose one additional course from the approved electives listed below.2
Elective Rotation 1 (Geriatrics or Long-Term Care)
Public Policy of Aging
Aging Women & Cultural Issues
Pharmaceutical Investigation
End of Life Care
Contemporary Issues in Aging
Advanced Topics (Communication in Later Life)
Total Hours10

Global Health (for Pharmacy) Area of Emphasis Requirements

The area of emphasis program in global health trains students to be able to provide patient-centered care at home and abroad.  Its focus is on providing both didactic and experiential education that will allow students to have an understanding and an appreciation for the global nature of healthcare and how pharmacy practice can impact individuals worldwide.  More information can be found on the School's webpage at http://pharmacy.hsc.wvu.edu/student-services/description-of-the-professional-program/areas-of-emphasiscertificate-program/.

PHAR 778 Travel Medicine and Global Pharmacy Practice2
Select one course from the following:5
Elective Rotation 1
Elective Rotation 2
Selective Rotations
Select one additional course:3
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Health Communication
Intercultural Communication
Introduction to Africana Studies
Women in International Development
Public Health Epidemiology
Outbreak Assessment
Introduction to International Relations
PHAR 713
Medical Spanish for Pharmacy
Introduction to Global Public Health
Total Hours10


Additional Requirements

1) Students will have to complete either: a) an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) that takes place in an underserved community, such as a rotation in Anchorage or Nome, Alaska, one with the Indian Health Service, or one at a Federally Qualified Health Center (e.g.,  Cabin Creek, Camden-on-Gauley),  or  b) an approved summer internship or medical mission that contains a global health emphasis.   The summer internship or medical mission must be focused on global health and be of a minimum duration of 2 weeks. The school will maintain a list of approved internships when possible.  However the student may inquire about the acceptability of other programs which are not listed.

2) All students will serve as Global Health Ambassadors for international students visiting the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy when they are in Morgantown.  The Ambassador’s role will require students to: a) organize and host social events outside of the School of Pharmacy attempting to incorporate the visiting students’ wishes into the planned activities, and b) organizing and participating as School of Pharmacy representatives during the HSC’s Global Health Week.

All students must remain in good academic standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program to remain in the area of emphasis program.  Students on probation in the Doctor of Pharmacy program will be evaluated by the Academic Standards committee and may be removed from the area of emphasis program.

Translational Pharmacy Research Area of Emphasis

Research is an integral component of the education and practice of pharmacy, enabling development of new information, technologies, and processes which are essential for improving patient care, therapeutics outcomes and growth of the profession. The importance of research in the profession of pharmacy is well established.  The Area of Emphasis (AoE) in Translational Pharmacy Research will allow students to understand and recognize the importance of translational research (e.g., how basic sciences contributions are applied in improving the quality of patients’ health, how observations in the clinic direct new scientific hypotheses, and how health services and outcomes research impacts access, cost, quality and outcomes of health care). 

course REQUIREMENTS

Required research course:
PHAR 749Pharmaceutical Investigation * 1
Electives **8
Elective Rotation 1 (must be a research elective)
Elective Rotation 2
Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research
Drugs: Bench to Market
History of Drug Discovery
Graduate Seminar in Health Outcomes Research
Graduate Seminar
Seminar in Nanoscience
Pharmacology Journal Club
Journal Club
Education Journal Club
Pharmacoeconomics
Social and Behavioral Theory and Health Outcomes Research
Health Survey Research Methods
Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research
Advanced Topics (Health Outcomes Research Designs)
Written Thesis
Oral Presentation and Defense
Total Hours9
*

 Students may complete 1-3 hours of research credit.  Each credit hour equals 3 hours of laboratory or clinic based research per week.

**

 Students complete 8-9 hours from the list of electives

additional Requirements

  • Students involved in clinical research must take the CITI training for Human Research offered through WVU and which must be kept current.
  • Present his/her project as a poster or oral presentation at the Annual HSC Research Day.
  • Offer an oral presentation of the work (which is open to the public). Students that are enrolled in the AoE must attend.
  • Write a summary of his/her research and findings. This project will be distributed to the certification committee members at least three weeks prior to the oral presentation. The certification committee will be comprised of the research mentor, two additional faculty members selected by the research mentor, and the AoE program director.  One committee member can be from outside of the School of Pharmacy with prior approval by the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs.
  • All Pharm.D. students in good academic standing are eligible for participation.  Acceptance and continuation in the program is contingent on each student identifying a research mentor and committee members, who will guide the research progress and completion.

Major Learning Goals

Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm. D.)

Educational Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the West Virginia University Doctor of Pharmacy degree program, the graduate will be able to accomplish the following educational outcomes (EOs):

EO 1   Foundational Knowledge and Skills (Learner) - Develop, integrate, and apply foundational knowledge (e.g., concepts, facts, principles) from biological, pharmaceutical, social, behavioral, administrative, and clinical sciences to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug actions, solve therapeutic problems, and advance individual and population health.

  • Acquire and demonstrate depth and breadth of knowledge of foundational scientific, clinical, socioeconomic, and humanistic concepts and skills.
  • Explain how knowledge in the foundational sciences is integral to pharmacy practice.
  • Integrate knowledge from foundational sciences to explain how specific drugs or drug classes work and evaluate their potential value in individuals and populations.
  • Apply foundational concepts and skills to practice.
  • Use scientific reasoning and critical thinking skills in practice to address problems, issues, or concerns.
  • Develop and apply creative and innovative approaches to effectively resolve problems and improve patient outcomes.
  • Apply an evidence-based approach to practice by identifying appropriate questions to address, using databases and other resources to retrieve information, critically analyzing and interpreting relevant scientific information and other evidence, formulating sound conclusions, and integrating the best published evidence with expertise and individual patient values/needs.
  • Analyze and use epidemiologic, pharmacoeconomic, medication utilization, and quality improvement data when developing evidence-based programs and protocols.
  • Apply knowledge of research methodology to design or conduct basic research, practice-based studies, or clinical trials.
  • Use information technology where appropriate to enhance individual knowledge and skills.

EO 2   Communication Skills (Communicator, Educator) – Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group, or organization.

  • Use appropriate verbal and nonverbal communication skills with individuals or groups, including patients, health professionals and others.
  • Use effective written communication skills with patients, health professionals, and others, including the development of documents pertinent to professional or organizational needs (e.g., monographs, reports).   
  • Educate target audiences by using the most effective method to deliver information, in coordination with other health care professionals as appropriate.
  • Use technology to facilitate or enhance professional communications and presentations.

EO 3   Professionalism, Advocacy, and Leadership (Professional, Leader, Advocate) - Exhibit behaviors and values consistent with the professional trust given by patients, healthcare providers, and society; assure that patients’ best interests are represented; and demonstrate responsibility for achieving shared goals regardless of position.

  • Conduct pharmacy practice duties and patient care responsibilities in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local laws, statutes, and regulations, as well as professional guidelines and standards.
  • Serve as an advocate, leader, and change agent for pharmacy and pharmacists’ professional roles and responsibilities by implementing or participating in new, evidence-based models for cost-effective pharmacist-delivered patient care.
  • Serve as an advocate for community and patient health and medication therapy needs, including disadvantaged or underserved patients and those from diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, while honoring their autonomy and dignity.
  • Serve as a positive role model in actions/communications for peers and other health care providers by maintaining a high standard for personal and professional demeanor and ethical conduct.
  • Respect all points of view in professional interactions while placing patients’ needs and desires at the forefront.
  • Demonstrate compassion, empathy, honesty, integrity, ethical behavior and altruism in all actions and communications with patients, families, and care providers.  
  • Develop professional competence through ongoing, active and self-directed pursuit of new knowledge and skills.
  • Identify and analyze emerging health care and pharmacy issues and incorporate new roles, products and services into practice that can improve patient outcomes.
  • Accept accountability and responsibility for one’s words and actions.

EO 4   Self-Awareness (Insightful) – Examine and assess personal knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes, beliefs, motivation, and emotions and strive for continual improvement.

  • Conduct self-assessments on a regular basis and create, implement, evaluate, and modify as needed plans for personal improvement and continuing professional development.
  • Recognize personal strengths and limitations and seek assistance when needed.
  • Approach tasks and situations with flexibility and a desire to learn.
  • Accept constructive criticism and display a willingness to correct and learn from errors.

EO 5    Interprofessional Collaboration (Collaborator) – Actively participate as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs.

  • Collaborate with health care professionals, patients, and/or caregivers to ensure that desired patient-specific or population-based health outcomes are achieved.
  • Facilitate team building among health care professionals by developing and maintaining an atmosphere of mutual respect and shared values that place the patient at the forefront.
  • Effectively utilize the knowledge, expertise, and unique roles of health care team providers and refer patients to others when indicated.
  • Serve as the medication expert on a collaborative care team by managing the pharmacotherapy for patients' medical conditions and by proactively providing drug product and other medication related information to team members.
  • Accept responsibility for medication-related outcomes on the care team.

EO 6   Patient Care (Provider) – Provide patient-centered care as the medication expert.

  • Accurately interpret, prepare and/or compound, handle and dispense prescriptions for patients.
  • Obtain necessary patient-specific data (e.g., consulting patient records, taking medication histories, performing basic physical assessments, ordering/interpreting lab tests), and evaluate and use these data when performing patient care related responsibilities. 
  • Evaluate pharmaceutical products, including information about the drug, dosage form, delivery system and cost/benefit, when conducting a medication review or preparing a care plan.
  • Conduct comprehensive medication reviews and prepare individualized care plans to optimize patient outcomes, with emphasis on commonly encountered chronic or high risk conditions amenable to pharmacotherapy and patients at greater risk for adverse events.
  • Work with patients, caregivers, and health care professionals to implement specific therapy plans.
  • Educate and empower patients to take an active role in their health and incorporate recommendations for healthy living and self-care into care plans.
  • Monitor and evaluate patients during therapy for drug product or pharmacotherapy problems, patient concerns, or adherence issues and recommend or implement solutions.
  • Work with patients and other health care providers to ensure the continued success of individual care plans.
  • Document patient-care services in charts/medical records and on forms needed for reimbursement.
  • Counsel patients and/or caregivers about the following to help ensure a care plan’s success:  i) medications, non-drug therapy, dietary supplements and natural products; ii) insurance and other options for obtaining necessary medications; iii) proper use of testing devices and medical goods and equipment; and iv) healthy lifestyle changes.

EO 7   Population-Based Care (Promoter, Provider) – Design and implement prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness.         

  • Develop, recommend, and provide preventive health services, such as administration of vaccines and screening tests.
  • Develop and implement disease management programs based upon identified needs and priorities (e.g., cost, access, and patient satisfaction considerations; commonly encountered, chronic conditions managed by pharmacotherapy).
  • Evaluate and adjust interventions as needed to maximize population health.
  • Promote public awareness of health promotion and disease prevention strategies.
  • Design, develop, and disseminate public health related educational materials or services in a culturally competent manner.
  • Work with health care professionals and other personnel to identify and help resolve key public health issues and problems, and participate in policies or strategies to address them.

EO 8    Pharmacy and Medication Use Systems (Manager) – Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of pharmacy management including operations, human and fiscal resources, marketing, and leadership principles.
  • Design, use, and manage systems to prepare, dispense, distribute and administer medications to optimally serve patient’s drug-related needs.
  • Use knowledge of the organization and financing of the U.S. healthcare system to provide and effectively manage progressive pharmacy services.
  • Develop a business plan for integrating clinical and distributive services that includes methods for supporting and obtaining reimbursement for clinical services provided to patients.  
  • Demonstrate and apply knowledge of national standards, guidelines, best practices, and established principles and processes for safe medication use to protect patient safety.  
  • Participate in quality improvement programs and employ performance indicators to enhance the quality of care and cost effectiveness of services provided and to optimize safe, appropriate medication use.
  • Participate in developing and performing medication use evaluations to identify and resolve drug therapy problems or concerns.
  • Reconcile a patient’s medications when transitioning from one care setting to another by communicating effectively with all involved health care professionals.
  • Use current and emerging information and system technologies to enhance safe and effective medication use.
  • Provide recommendations for developing and managing a formulary that incorporate pharmacoeconomic principles.
  • Actively participate in, and contribute to the development of, strategies to minimize drug misuse/abuse.

Courses

PHAR 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

PHAR 693. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

PHAR 694A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students. (Grading may be S/U.).

PHAR 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

PHAR 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

PHAR 700. Pharmacy as a Profession. 1 Hour.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. Introduces students to the concept of professionalism, the scope of pharmacy practice opportunities, the health care system as it relates to pharmacy, and other contemporary issues in pharmacy practice. (Grading will be S/U.).

PHAR 701. Pharmaceutical Care Lab 1. 2 Hours.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. Students will develop skills in medical terminology, communications, information retrieval, dispensing, compounding, calculations, pharmaceutical care, and problem-solving skills.

PHAR 702. Pharmaceutics 1. 3 Hours.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. Introduces drug physical-chemical characteristics relevant to the design and performance of delivery systems. Pharmaceutical dosage forms taught include disperse and polydisperse systems (suspensions, emulsions, creams, ointments, aerosols and transdermals).

PHAR 703. Pharmacy Practice Experience 1. 1 Hour.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. Provides an overview of the roles and responsibilities of community pharmacists and provides experiential learning in a community pharmacy setting. First course in a six-semester sequence that introduces students to various pharmacy practice settings.

PHAR 704. Introduction to Research. 1 Hour.

Provides pharmacy students with a forum for the discussion of a wide variety of research activities and careers. Also provides an appreciation for the science on which the pharmacy profession is based and continually evolves.

PHAR 706. Biopharmaceutics. 2 Hours.

Introduces the fundamental principles of biopharmaceutics. This area of knowledge deals with the drug performance at the delivery system – human body interface, and addresses how physico-chemical drug properties, delivery system characteristics, and physiological processes influence drug distribution and affect the body, as well as drug bioavailability.

PHAR 707. Drug-Induced Diseases. 2 Hours.

Focused study of adverse effects of prescription and non-prescription medications designed for practical application across multiple disease states.

PHAR 708. Pharmaceutics 2. 3 Hours.

PR: PHAR 702. Continuation of PHAR 702. Solids dosage forms (tablets, capsules, sustained-release), regulatory pathways for marketing drugs, and biopharmaceutical principles (dosage form behavior in body).

PHAR 709. Immunology and Biotechnology. 2 Hours.

PR: First year professional standing or consent. Students will learn basic functions of the immune system, elements of the pharmaceutical applications of biotechnology, and be introduced to the chemotherapy of infections.

PHAR 710. Pharmacy Practice Experience 2. 1 Hour.

PR:PHAR 703 or consent. Provides an overview of the roles and responsibilities of community pharmacists and provides experiential learning in a community pharmacy setting. Second course in a six-semester sequence that introduces students to various pharmacy practice settings.

PHAR 711. Chemical Properties of Drugs. 2 Hours.

PR: First year professional standing or consent. Principles of chemical stability and chemical properties as they relate to drug molecules. Topics to be covered include functional group analysis, solubility, oil/water partitioning, organic acids and bases, and drug decomposition and metabolism.

PHAR 712. Pharmaceutical Care Lab 2. 2 Hours.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. Continuation of PHAR 701.

PHAR 715. Pharmacotherapeutics 1. 4 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. Principles and concepts of pathophysiology and pharmacotherapeutics. An organ system approach to disease states and their therapeutic management is followed.

PHAR 716. Chemistry of Drug Action 1. 3 Hours.

PR: PHAR 711 or consent. Provides a basic understanding of relationships between the chemical structure of a drug and its biological effect. Physiochemical properties, enzymatic transformations and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of important pharmaceutical agents are discussed.

PHAR 717. Pharmacy Practice Experience 3. 1 Hour.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. Introduces students to the principles of service learning through development of an on-site healthcare-related service project. Third course of a six-semester sequence that introduces students to various pharmacy practice settings.

PHAR 718. Pediatric Pharmacotherapy. 2 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. Overview of common pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy principles in the pediatric population and selection of drug therapy to treat the pediatric patient.

PHAR 719. Pharmacy Practice Experience 4. 1 Hour.

PR: PHAR 717 or consent. Introduces students to the principles of service learning through implementation of an on-site healthcare related service project. Fourth course of a six-semester sequence that introduces students to various pharmacy practice settings.

PHAR 720. Patient Health Education. 2 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. Interpersonal communication skills will be enhanced in the areas of patient-centered and colleague-centered communications. Students will learn processes for providing pharmaceutical care (e.g., interviewing and counseling patients; formulating a plan; monitoring; and documenting information).

PHAR 721. Advocacy and Leadership. 2 Hours.

PR: Second and third professional year standing or consent. The course will focus on developing the student's leadership skills as an advocate for the profession of pharmacy.

PHAR 722. Weapons of Mass Destruction and Disaster Planning. 1 Hour.

Through didactic, hands on instruction, and participation in real world disaster planning sessions and/or drills, students learn about weapons of mass destruct (WMD) surveillance and mitigation in addition to disaster planning principles.

PHAR 723. Pharmaceutical Care Lab 3. 1 Hour.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. Continuation of PHAR 712.

PHAR 724. Pharmaceutical Care Lab 4. 2 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. Continuation of PHAR 723.

PHAR 725. Pharmacotherapeutics 2. 4 Hours.

PR: PHAR 715 or consent. A continuation of PHAR 715.

PHAR 726. Chemistry of Drug Action 2. 2 Hours.

PR: PHAR 716 or consent. A continuation of PHAR 716.

PHAR 727. Medical Literature Evaluation. 2 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. Emphasis is placed on the critical analysis and evaluation of the primary literature. Seconday and computerized information resources are also discussed, including other selected aspects of drug information.

PHAR 728. Pharmacy Management. 2 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. This course provides an introductory survey of the basic principles of personnel and fiscal management as they apply to organizational planning and decision-making, organizational design and structure, leadership and control in organizations, and the issues facing pharmacy managers.

PHAR 730. Pharmacotherapeutics 3. 4 Hours.

PR: PHAR 725 or consent. A continuation of PHAR 725.

PHAR 731. Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacokinetics. 3 Hours.

PR: Third year professional standing or consent. Fundamental principles of pharmacogenomics (how genetic influences affect drug dosing and efficacy) and pharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetic and biological processes a drug undergoes upon entering the body).

PHAR 732. Non-Prescription Drugs. 3 Hours.

PR: Third year professional standing or consent. An advanced level course on the appropriate selection, and use of non-prescription drug products in the contemporary practice setting, the basis for self-medication, assessment of patient condition, and approach to patient counseling.

PHAR 733. Pharmacy Systems. 2 Hours.

PR: Third year professioal standing or consent. Basic principles of financial management as they apply to the day-to-day operatoins in pharmacy systems present in institutional, community, long-term care facilities and other pharmacy venues.

PHAR 735. Pharmaceutical Care Lab 5. 1 Hour.

PR: PHAR 724. Continuation of PHAR 724.

PHAR 736. Pharmaceutical Care Lab 6. 1 Hour.

PR: Third Year Professional standing or consent. Experience in pharmaceutical compounding, patient assessment and monitoring, professional/ethical decision making, pharmacokinetic dosing of medications, and prevention of adverse drug-related events and medication errors.

PHAR 737. Disease Prevention Health Promotion. 2 Hours.

PR: Third year professional standing or consent. This course exposes pharmacy students to pharmacoepidemiology and public health. Instruction focuses on pharmacists as integral to preventing and detecting disease and promoting community health. Emphasis is given to rural health care and Appalachian culture.

PHAR 738. Outcomes Assessment and Quality Improvement. 2 Hours.

PR: Third professional year standing or consent. Outcomes assessment and quality improvement will expose students to the development and implementation of formularies, drug use evaluations, outcomes assessment, and quality improvement. Emphasis will be placed on how these issues relate to pharmaceutical services.

PHAR 739. Therapeutic Patient Monitoring. 2 Hours.

PR: Third professional year standing or consent. Employs both didactic and experiential instruction to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to care for patients with diabetes, perform immunizations, and care for complex patients with multiple disease states.

PHAR 740. Pharmacotherapeutics 4. 4 Hours.

PR: PHAR 730 or consent. A continuation of PHAR 730.

PHAR 741. Clinical Pharmacokinetics. 3 Hours.

PR: PHAR 731 or consent. This course will review advanced concepts in pharmacokinetics and cover the basic pharmacokinetic properties of commonly used drugs and apply these principles to drug dosing, patient management, and rational therapeutic drug monitoring.

PHAR 742. Pharmacy Practice Experience 5. 1 Hour.

PR: Third professional year standing or consent. Provides experiential learning in an acute or ambulatory care pharmacy practice setting. Fifth course in a six-semester sequence that introduces students to various pharmacy practice settings.

PHAR 743. Teach to Learn: Learn to Teach. 2 Hours.

Provides pharmacy students the opportunity to learn how to teach in higher education/pharmacy and develop their teaching skills by participating in select teaching and learning activities.

PHAR 744. Education Journal Club. 1 Hour.

PR: PHAR 743 or Consent. Evaluate educational research articles from pharmacy education and other healthcare disciplines. Students will present and critically analyze educational literature and develop presentation skills.

PHAR 745. Critical Care Pharmacotherapy. 2 Hours.

PR: Third professional year standing or consent. Gain knowledge in multiple facets of critical care pharmacotherapy, particularly for students interested in pharmacy residency training in a clinical setting.

PHAR 746. Pharmacy Practice Experience 6. 1 Hour.

PR: PHAR 742 or consent. Provides experiential learning in an acute or ambulatory care pharmacy practice setting. Sixth course in a six-semester sequence that introduces students to various pharmacy practice settings.

PHAR 747. History of Pharmacy. 2 Hours.

Gives the student a deeper appreciation of the background of pharmacy and its development from ancient times to present.

PHAR 748. Acute Care Case Studies. 2 Hours.

PR: Third professional year standing or consent. Gain experience developing pharmaceutical care plans in an acute care setting. Further prepares students interested in pursuing pharmacy residency training.

PHAR 749A. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749B. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacceutical systems and policy or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749C. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749D. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749E. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems, and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be S/U.).

PHAR 749F. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749G. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PHAR 749G. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hr, PR: Consent. Original Investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749H. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749I. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749J. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749K. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Conssent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749L. Pharmaceutical Pharmacy. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749M. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749N. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749O. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749P. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749Q. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749R. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749S. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749T. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749U. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749V. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749W. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749X. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749Y. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 749Z. Pharmaceutical Investigation. 2-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Original investigation in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutical systems and policy, or clinical pharmacy. (Grading may be P/F.).

PHAR 750. Automation and Technology. 2 Hours.

PR: Second year professional standing or consent. Provides an understanding of the newest technology that is available to a pharmacist in a retail or institutional setting. Students will learn to use PowerPoint, and gain experience making presentations and public speaking.

PHAR 751. Geriatrics. 2 Hours.

PR: Second or third year pharmacy students. A review of common pharmacotherapeutic and social issues of importance to older adult patients.

PHAR 752. History of Drug Discovery. 2 Hours.

This course is concerned with the way in which advances in chemistry and biochemistry have influenced advances in drug discovery and therapeutics beginning with the late 18th century through today.

PHAR 753. Social and Behavioral Theory and Health Outcomes Research. 3 Hours.

Basic social and behavioral theories related to the health behavior change and health outcomes. Open to graduate students in pharmacy, public health, or other health care fields.

PHAR 754. Decision Analysis in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

Core skills in clinical decision analysis which builds on concepts derived from epidemiology, biostatistics, computing, economics and operations research and applies them to medical and pharmacological decisions.

PHAR 755. Pharmacoeconomics. 3 Hours.

This graduate-level course is intended to train graduate students in evaluating and conducting pharmacoeconomic research.

PHAR 756. Health Survey Research Methods. 3 Hours.

This course seeks to increase students' understanding of survey research methods and to develop basic skills in survey development and administration.

PHAR 757. Patient Reported Outcomes. 3 Hours.

Provides a foundation in health outcomes research with an emphasis on patient reported outcomes in health service research.

PHAR 758. Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research. 2 Hours.

Provides overview of ethical and regulatory aspects of clinical research.

PHAR 759. Clinical and Population Practicum. 1 Hour.

Expose students to a population of interest in preparation for a research project. This course will help students to understand the lived experience of the population of interest and expose students to aspects of the healthcare system. Students will either work with a clinical population or community-based population to address one or more disease states. Grading will be Pass/Fail.

PHAR 760. Acute Care Rotation 1. 5 Hours.

PR: Fourth year professional standing or consent. Five-week experience in the delivery of pharmaceutical care in an acute care setting.

PHAR 761. Acute Care Rotation 2. 5 Hours.

PR: Fourth year professional standing or consent. Experience in the delivery of pharmaceutical care in an acute care setting.

PHAR 762. Ambulatory Care Rotation 1. 5 Hours.

PR: Fourth year professional standing or consent. Experience in the delivery of pharmaceutical care in an ambulatory care setting.

PHAR 763. Ambulatory Care Rotation 2. 5 Hours.

PR: Fourth year professional standing or consent. Five-week experience in the delivery of pharmaceutical care in an ambulatory care setting.

PHAR 764. Elective Rotation 1. 5 Hours.

PR: Fourth year professional standing or consent. Five-week experience in a pharmacy practice setting, such as acute care, ambulatory, community, hospital, poison center, drug information, home health, long term care, or research.

PHAR 765. Elective Rotation 2. 5 Hours.

PR: Fourth year professional standing or consent. Five-week experience in a pharmacy practice setting, such as acute care, ambulatory, community, hospital, poison center, drug information, home health, long term care, or research.

PHAR 766. Selective Rotations. 5 Hours.

PR: Fourth year professional standing or consent. Five-week experience in a pharmacy practice setting, selected from a list and includes: pharmacy administration, discharge counseling, drug information, informatics, long term care, managed care, medication reconciliation, medication safety, nuclear pharmacy, clinical toxicology, and quality outcomes.

PHAR 768. HEOR/HSOR Internship. 1-6 Hours.

Strengthen practical knowledge and hands-on experience in the areas of Health Services and Outcomes Research/Health Economics and Outcomes Research by working with pharmaceutical companies, clinical research organizations, federal, state, and local governments, policy think tanks, or health care systems.

PHAR 769. Advanced Health Service Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Provides a working knowledge of health services research methods and how to apply these methods to answer typical research questions in health services research. The course will examine concepts but will have an applied focus with hands-on research using publicly available datasets or those that students have access for their dissertations/manuscripts.

PHAR 770. Community Rotation. 5 Hours.

PR: Fourth year professional standing or consent. Five-week experience in the delivery of pharmaceutical care in a community pharmacy setting.

PHAR 772. Institutional Rotation. 5 Hours.

PR: Fourth year professional standing or consent. Five-week experience in the delivery of pharmaceutical care in a health system setting.

PHAR 774. Current Topics in Pharmacy. 1 Hour.

Discussion of current topics in pharmacy practice. Core components of giving a seminar and journal club will be practiced.

PHAR 775. Advanced Biopharmaceutics. 3 Hours.

Concepts of biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics in relation to the design and evaluation of dosage forms and determination of rational dosage regimens in health and disease.

PHAR 776. Preparing Residency Applicants. 2 Hours.

Increase knowledge and skills needed to pursue postgraduate residency training in pharmacy, and implement measures to increase pharmacy residency competitiveness.

PHAR 777. Health Outcomes Research Designs. 2 Hours.

Focuses on the skills required to design, conduct, and analyze research topics in health outcomes research. Includes a study of statistics, analysis of research design and methodology, use of library resources, and evaluation of current literature.

PHAR 778. Travel Medicine and Global Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Identifies and explores major issues in global health with a specific focus on global pharmacy practice and medication therapy. Students will also learn fundamentals in travel medicine so they can assist international travelers in preventing and treating travel-related maladies.

PHAR 779. Drugs: Bench to Market. 3 Hours.

PR:Graduate standing PR: Graduate Standing or permission of instructor. This is an introductory course that describes the process of drug discovery to the development of new forms for therapeutic use. Topics covered include drug design/discovery, pharmacokinetics and dynamics, pharmaceutics and industry pharmacy.

PHAR 780. Introduction to Molecular Modeling. 4 Hours.

PR: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Introduction to molecular modeling describes computational methods for chemical and biological problems and is designed to enable the student to use molecular modeling methods as a research tool in their current or future research activities.

PHAR 781. Drug Metabolism. 3 Hours.

PR: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. This course presents a comprehensive review of the field of drug metabolism with an emphasis on the chemistry and enzymology of drug biotransformation, and current methods in drug metabolism research.

PHAR 782. Tumors of the Central Nervous System Journal Club. 1 Hour.

(May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credit hours.) Fundamental and advanced topics focused on drug distribution into normal brain, brain pathology and brain cancers. Other areas of focus include, advanced drug delivery methods, pharmacokinetics, experimental design and statistical analysis. Students will present and critically analyze scientific literature and develop presentation skills.

PHAR 783. Pharmacy Cell Biology Seminar. 1 Hour.

A literature review course in which each student will present and critically analyze primary literature in cell and molecular biology as pertinent to pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences.

PHAR 784. Pharmacology Journal Club. 1 Hour.

A primary literature based course that critically evaluates the latest findings and methods used in pharmacological research.

PHAR 785. Pharmacoepidemiology. 3 Hours.

This course covers basic principles and research study designs used in pharmacoepidemiology, as well as a review of the primary literature that details case examples of drugs withdrawn from the US drug market.

PHAR 786. Health Services Research and Secondary Database. 3 Hours.

PR: PHAR 785. This course presents various topics related to large databases including common study designs, advantages and limitations, and basic steps to extracting and analyzing large databases.

PHAR 787. Drug Discovery and Development. 1 Hour.

This seminar will teach students in the Pharmaceutical Sciences and related disciplines the current state-of-the- art of drug discovery, design, and development, develop student presentation skills, and convey the importance of staying current with key developments.

PHAR 788. Graduate Seminar in Health Outcomes Research. 1 Hour.

(May be repeated for credit toward graduation.) Forum for graduate students to present research, discuss research issues and contemporary topics of interest, develop an understanding of research methods through discussion, while focusing on scientific presentation skills. Topics vary from semester to semester.

PHAR 789. Seminar in Nanoscience. 2 Hours.

(May be repeated for a maximum of 4 hours.) Facilitates interdisciplinary research at the nanoscale by providing a forum for discussion and exploration of nanoscale science and engineering from a variety of perspectives including research and development of nanoscale devices and systems. Grading will be Pass/Fail.

PHAR 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of pharmacy. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

PHAR 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigaation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

PHAR 792A-H. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

PHAR 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

PHAR 794A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

PHAR 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

PHAR 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

PHAR 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

PHAR 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

PHAR 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

PHAR 800. Pharmacy Practice and Management 1. 4 Hours.

Introduces student to the practice of pharmacy, with a focus on community pharmacy. PPM 1 is the first course in a five-course sequence (PPM 1-5) that introduces and reinforces the distributive, clinical, and administrative roles of pharmacists in various practice settings.

PHAR 801. Drug Delivery. 5 Hours.

An introduction to the concepts and techniques involved in the design and evaluation of pharmaceutical dosage forms, principles of physical pharmacy and drug delivery, and their applications in patient care.

PHAR 802. Preparation of Pharmaceutical Products. 2 Hours.

Gain experience in pharmaceutical calculations and preparing sterile and non-sterile dosage forms. Students will apply the principles of pharmaceutics to the preparation of pharmaceutical products.

PHAR 810. Pharmacy Practice and Management 2. 4 Hours.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. The second course in a five-course sequence (PPM 1-5). Introduces and reinforces the distributive, clinical, and administrative roles of pharmacists in various practice settings, with a focus on community pharmacy practice.

PHAR 811. Foundational Pharmacy Skills. 1 Hour.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. Provide students with foundational skills necessary for the provision of patient care including physical assessment, point of care testing, and oral and written communication. Many skills learned during this course will be further strengthened throughout pharmacy school.

PHAR 812. Drug Chemistry and Biotechnology. 3 Hours.

PR: First year professional standing or consent. Introduces principles of chemical stability and chemical properties as they relate to drugs and to the basic metabolic processes observed for drug molecules. Biotechnology will focus on pharmaceutical applications of cell and molecular biotechnology.

PHAR 813. Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacogenomics. 4 Hours.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. Develops an understanding of fundamental principles of biopharmaceutics and pharmacogenomics.

PHAR 814. Biochemical Pharmacology. 4 Hours.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. Provides a basis for understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which drugs and the body interact. This course will use drug classes to introduce foundational concepts of drug action and the application of pharmacological tools to better understand how drugs work in the body.

PHAR 815. Self-Care. 3 Hours.

PR: First professional year standing or consent. Provides an introduction to nonprescription medications and the application to patient care. Learners will assess the patient, make appropriate recommendations, and educate the patient on self-care treatment options for commonly encountered disease states and patient complaints.

PHAR 818. Intro Community Rotation. 1,3 Hour.

PR: PHAR 800 or PR or CONC: PHAR 810. Introductory pharmacy practice experience in a community pharmacy setting.

PHAR 820. Pharmacy Practice and Management 3. 3 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. The third course in a five-course sequence (PPM 1-5). Introduces the role of the pharmacist in public health initiatives, pharmacoepidemiology, and enhancing quality in the healthcare system.

PHAR 822. Service Learning Practice Experience 1. 1 Hour.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. The first course in a 2-semester series that introduces students to the basic principles of service learning through on-site healthcare-related service projects. Interprofessional education is a component of the course.

PHAR 823. Pulmonology. 3 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. First course in the systems-based therapy series with a focus on pulmonology. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with pulmonary diseases.

PHAR 824. Cardiology. 5 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. Second course in the systems-based therapy series with a focus on cardiology. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with cardiovascular diseases.

PHAR 825. Nephrology. 2 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. Third course in the systems-based therapy series with a focus on nephrology. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with kidney diseases.

PHAR 826. Evidence-Based Practice. 3 Hours.

PR: Second professional year standing or consent. The components of evidence-based practice are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of information resources in practice and the critical analysis and evaluation of primary literature and other types of information.

PHAR 830. Pharmacy Practice and Management 4. 3 Hours.

The fourth course in a five-course sequence (PPM 1-5). Introduces and reinforces the distributive, clinical, and administrative roles of pharmacists with a focus on health-systems pharmacy practice and highlights the pharmacist’s role in financial management, pharmacoeconomics, and patient reported outcomes.

PHAR 832. Service Learning Practice Experience 2. 1 Hour.

PR: PHAR 822. The second course in a 2-semester series that introduces students to the basic principles of service learning through on-site healthcare-related service projects.

PHAR 833. Endocrinology. 3 Hours.

Fourth course in the systems-based therapy series with a focus on endocrinology. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with endocrine diseases.

PHAR 834. Immunology. 3 Hours.

Fifth course in the systems-based therapy series with a focus on immunology. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with immunological diseases and hypersensitivities.

PHAR 835. Rheumatology and Pain. 2 Hours.

Sixth course in the systems-based therapy series with a focus on management of rheumatologic disorders and pain. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with these diseases.

PHAR 836. Research in the Pharmaceutical Sciences. 3 Hours.

An overview of the process of conducting health-related research focusing on concepts, principles and methodology involved with the research process. Students gain experience in research proposal development and practice writing skills. Student learning is facilitated by didactic lectures, active learning and independent small group sessions.

PHAR 838. Intro Institutional Rotation. 1 Hour.

PR or CONC: PHAR 830. Gain experience in an institutional pharmacy setting.

PHAR 840. Pharmacy Practice and Management 5. 3 Hours.

The fifth course in a five-course sequence (PPM 1-5). This course focuses on pharmacy management related to financial and operational management of pharmacies, marketing of pharmacy services, health and pharmacy policy and advocacy, and human resources management.

PHAR 843. Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Seventh course in the systems-based therapy series with a focus on gastroenterology and nutrition. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with gastrointestinal diseases and nutrition support.

PHAR 844. Infectious Diseases. 3 Hours.

Eighth course in the systems-based therapy series with a focus on infectious diseases. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with infectious diseases.

PHAR 845. Neurology and Psychiatry. 4 Hours.

Ninth course in the systems-based therapy sequence with a focus on neurology and psychiatry. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with neurologic and psychiatric diseases.

PHAR 848. Acute Care Practice Experience. 2 Hours.

Gain knowledge as well as hands-on experience in the acute care setting. Students will learn the key components of acute care practice, perform activities that would be expected to be completed in acute care experiential rotations (such as medication reconciliation and formulary monographs), and simulate rounding experiences in an interprofessional environment. Interprofessional education is a component of this course.

PHAR 849. Ambulatory Care Practice Experience. 2 Hours.

Gain knowledge as well as hands-on experience in the ambulatory care setting. Activities will include ambulatory patient assessment, medication regimen evaluation, patient presentations, direct patient education, and targeted group education. Interprofessional education is a component of this course.

PHAR 853. Hematology/Oncology. 4 Hours.

Tenth course in the systems-based therapy series with a focus on hematology-oncology. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems in patients with hematological diseases and cancer.

PHAR 854. Special Populations. 3 Hours.

The final course in the systems-based therapy series that addresses special populations such as geriatrics, pediatrics and women's health (pregnancy, lactation, menopause) as well as disease processes that involve multiple body systems. Integrates scientific principles with clinical practice to enable students to prevent, identify, and resolve drug therapy problems.

PHAR 858. Comprehensive Assessment of Practice. 3 Hours.

Assess students’ readiness for successful completion of the upcoming advanced pharmacy practice experiences curriculum. Provides focused reinforcement of essential material relative to ensuring a student is practice ready, as well as reviewing difficult material from throughout the curriculum. Students complete a final objective structured clinical examination, which requires the demonstration of specific skills, including communication.

PHAR 859. Pharmacy Law and Ethics. 3 Hours.

PR: Third professional year standing or consent. The legal and ethical basis of pharmacy practice. Students learn about federal and state statutes, rules, and regulations that affect pharmacy practice. Ethics related situations that can arise during pharmacy practice will also be discussed.