Social and Behavioral Sciences

http://publichealth.hsc.wvu.edu/sbhs/

Degrees Offered:

  • Master of Public Health
  • Doctor of Philosophy

MPH in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The MPH degree with a major in Social and Behavioral Sciences (SBHS) addresses the behavioral, social, and environmental factors related to individual and population health and health disparities over the life span.  Research and practice in this track contributes to the development, administration, and evaluation of programs and policies in public health to promote and sustain healthy environments and lives for individuals and populations.

A student who graduates with an MPH degree with a major in Social and Behavioral Science from WVU will be qualified to work and provide leadership in public health and research settings at national, state or local levels, or work in the public or private sector on health promotion program implementation and evaluation efforts.

Ph.D. in PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES (Social and Behavioral Sciences MAJOR)

The mission of the Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences Major, is to provide state of the art doctoral education in the theory and application of social and behavioral science to a select group of highly qualified and committed students desiring to transform public health. Our program trains students using a research intensive curriculum led by a distinguished faculty at the cutting edge of public health science. This program emphasizes both evidence-based, theory-driven primary prevention of disease and injury and health promotion research and practice. Graduates will complete their degrees with a competitive record of research achievement, ready to embark on high-impact research careers.

The curriculum is designed so that students receive a methodologically-intense training and one-on-one research experience with faculty in Social and Behavioral Sciences, typically over a three- to four-year period. The first years of the program emphasize research and statistical methods complemented by theoretical and process-oriented coursework relevant to Social and Behavioral Sciences. During the latter years of the program, students are engaged in their dissertation research while given the freedom to further diversify their training by choosing electives.

Admission Guidelines for the MPH in Social and Behavioral Sciences (On Campus or Online)

  • Baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with a preferred GPA of 3.0
  • GRE scores of 146 (verbal), 144 (quantitative), 3.0 (analytical writing)
  • TOEFL scores (minimum 550 paper-based) (minimum 213 computer-based).  Internet-Based TOEFL (iBT) minimum score recommended for admission, which is an 80 (20 or higher in each of the four sections).  International Students Only.

Application Process (Fall Admissions Only):

If you are ready to apply to West Virginia University School of Public Health, the admissions team is here to assist you. Our School of Public Health is CEPH-accredited, and we participate in SOPHAS (Schools of Public Health Application Service). Our MPH Admissions process is a two-step process.  All MPH applications must be submitted through the national SOPHAS service and applicants must also submit a WVU Graduate application.

In addition to the general application, applicants must submit to SOPHAS a statement of purpose and objectives, official GRE test scores, three letters of reference, a current resume/curriculum vitae, and all university transcripts. SOPHAS requires original transcripts from ALL U.S. institutions attended! (Even Study Abroad) Please see each Major’s website for additional application requirements.

There is a $120 SOPHAS application fee. Applicants must indicate their first choice of MPH major, and may also indicate a second choice. A maximum of two choices is allowed.

  • E-submit your application as soon as the applicant entered information is complete. Do NOT wait for SOPHAS to receive transcripts, recommendations or test scores.
  • Plan Ahead! Allow up to 4 weeks for SOPHAS to verify grades, process and mail your application to your designated institutions after your documents have been received.
  • SOPHAS grants fee waivers based upon financial need for Peace Corps Volunteers, McNair Scholars, Gates Millennium Scholars Program, AmeriCorps, U.S. and International applicants.

Applications that are complete will then be reviewed by the department. Students will receive a communication from the WVU School of Public Health regarding their recommendation for acceptance and instructions to complete the WVU Graduate application and pay the $60.00 WVU application fee.

Important: When sending GRE scores for consideration for admission at WVU use the GRE WVU School of Public Health College code: 0157. This is the code that MUST be used, otherwise your GRE score will not be reported to SOPHAS and your application will be incomplete and therefore will not be reviewed for an admissions decision. [There are different codes for other programs at West Virginia University.]

Fall Admissions Only:

Fully completed applications received by April 15 will be considered first. Incomplete applications and new fully completed applications received by June 1 will be considered second, for those degree programs/concentrations that have openings after the April 15 decisions

Admission Guidelines for the Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences (Social and Behavioral Sciences Major)

Degree Requirements

  • A Master's degree in Public Health or a closely related field is strongly preferred.  Exceptional applicants with a Bachelor's degree in a relevant field may also be considered.
  • Minimum GPA of 3.0 is required, 3.5 is preferred.

Minimum Test Scores

  • The following GRE scores are preferred: Verbal 150; Quantitative 155; and Writing 3.5.
  • WVU requires international students to submit TOEFL scores.  Preferred scores are as follows: 550 on paper-based; 213 on computer-based; and 80 on internet-based test.

Application Procedure

Applying to the PhD program is a two-step process in which prospective students first submit an application through the national SOPHAS service.  If you are accepted into to the PhD program by the School, the next step is for you to complete a WVU Graduate Application (https://graduateadmissions.wvu.edu/).

The SOPHAS application requires:

  • Official test scores
  • Official transcripts from all US institutions attended
  • A Personal Statement
  • 3 Letters of Recommendation
  • Current CV/Resume

Applicants must indicate their first choice of Major and may indicate a second choice (you are allowed a maximum of two choices).

There is a $120 SOPHAS application fee.  However, SOPHAS grants fee waivers based upon financial need for McNair Scholars, Gates Millennium Scholars, as well as for AmeriCorps and Peace Corps Volunteers.

TIPS for completing the SOPHAS application:

  • APPLY EARLY!  Allow up to 4 weeks for SOPHAS to verify your transcripts and test scores and send them to the Universities to which you have applied.  Your application may not be reviewed if it does not contain verified transcripts and test scores.
  • When submitting your GRE scores, be sure to use the college code 0157 for the WVU School of Public Health. This code MUST be used so that verified scores are sent by SOPHAS to the WVU School of Public Health for review.
  • Submit your application once you have provided the required information.  DO NOT wait for SOPHAS to receive transcripts, recommendations or test scores prior to submitting your application.

Go to https://sophas.liaisoncas.com/applicant-ux/#/login to complete the SOPHAS application.

Personal Statement

The Personal Statement is a critical piece of the application. The content of the Statement and the applicant’s writing skills will be evaluated in the admissions decision.  The Statement should address the following in no more than 1000 words:

  • What is it about Public Health that interests you?
  • What is it about your selected major, specifically, that interests you?
  • What are your career goals?
  • What topics or areas of research do you wish to pursue and why?  If you have identified a potential dissertation topic, briefly describe that as well.
  • Which faculty members in the SPH do you see as being potential mentors to help you succeed in your area of interest?

Applicants should also include any additional information about their interests, background, prior experience, or special circumstances that may be helpful to the SPH Doctoral Admissions Committee.

Letters of Recommendation     

Three letters of recommendation are required.  At least two of these should be from people who can attest to your academic abilities.

Deadlines

The deadline by which you must submit your completed SOPHAS application is 5:00pm (EST) December 31.  New applications received after this deadline will not be reviewed.  All admissions are for the Fall semester.  We do not admit students into the PhD program in the Spring or Summer semesters.

Review Process

All completed and verified SOPHAS applications are first reviewed by the Admissions Committees of the major to which an applicant has applied (EPID, OEHS, or SBHS). Candidates that are recommended for admission at this level, are put forth to the SPH Doctoral Admissions Committee, which makes the final decisions on admissions and funding.

Advanced Standing for Applicants with an Approved Master's Degree

Students who enter the PhD program with an MPH or approved Master's degree are eligible for Advanced Standing.  This allows students to complete an abbreviated course of study that takes between 2 and 3 years to complete, depending on the student's past course work and current interests.

Master of Public Health

MPH Major in Social and Behavioral Sciences Description

The MPH degree with a major in Social and Behavioral Sciences (SBHS) addresses the behavioral, social, and environmental factors related to individual and population health and health disparities over the life span.  Research and practice in this track contributes to the development, administration, and evaluation of programs and policies in public health to promote and sustain healthy environments and lives for individuals and populations.

A student who graduates with an MPH degree with a major in Social and Behavioral Science from WVU will be qualified to work and provide leadership in public health and research settings at national, state or local levels, or work in the public or private sector on health promotion program implementation and evaluation efforts.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Major Competencies

In addition to the standard MPH Foundational Competencies required of all MPH students, our major in Social and Behavioral Sciences also prepares students to meet five competencies specific to the major.  These include:

  1. Practice community engagement principles when addressing public health problems.
  2. Appraise qualitative and quantitative data used in evaluating factors associated with improving public health.
  3. Employ social behavioral theories & frameworks designed to describe public health problems and improve public health interventions.
  4. Recommend interventions likely to improve public health.
  5. Organize interventions, including the assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health interventions.
  6. Communicate effectively among diverse stakeholders.

Major Requirements

A final GPA of 3.0 or higher is required for the successful completion of the program.
Students must earn a minimum grade of “C-” in all PUBH and SBHS coursework.
MPH Foundational Courses:
PUBH 610Contemporary Foundations of Public Health Practice2
PUBH 611Epidemiology for Public Health Practice2
PUBH 612Research Translation and Evaluation in Public Health Practice4
PUBH 620Building and Sustaining Public Health Capacity2
PUBH 621Public Health Prevention and Intervention3
PUBH 630MPH Field Practicum3
PUBH 640Leadership and Collaboration in Public Health3
PUBH 641Systems Thinking in Public Health Practice2
PUBH 696Graduate Seminar1
SBHS Major Courses:
SBHS 616Introduction to Public Health Interventions for Social and Behavioral Scientist4
SBHS 617Community Engagement and Advocacy in Public Health2
SBHS 611Community Assessment3
SBHS 615Intervention Design3
SBHS 620Implementing and Managing Public Health Programs3
SBHS 613Public Health Program Evaluation3
SBHS 629Capstone Course2
SBHS 693 (Special Topics)2
Total Hours44
  1. All students in the WVU SPH MPH program are required to maintain a portfolio that demonstrates their ability to meet the competencies associated with the MPH Foundational Courses, the Department Major Courses, and to apply a selection of those competencies in an approved practice-based setting(s).  This portfolio must be submitted for review at the end of each academic year, as well as reviewed and approved prior to the successful completion of the program.
  2. The MPH degree will be awarded based on successful completion of all academic requirements and demonstrated achievement of competencies via the student portfolio system and class-based evaluations of competency attainment.

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
PUBH 6102PUBH 6202
PUBH 6112PUBH 6213
PUBH 6124SBHS 6113
SBHS 6164SBHS 6172
 SBHS 693A1
 12 11
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
PUBH 6403PUBH 6303
PUBH 6412PUBH 6961
SBHS 6153SBHS 6133
SBHS 6203SBHS 6292
SBHS 693 (Special Topics)1 
 12 9
Total credit hours: 44

Doctor of Philosophy

Major Requirements

SBHS 601Social and Behavioral Theory3
SBHS 610Public Health Research Methods3
SBHS 611Community Assessment3
SBHS 613Public Health Program Evaluation3
SBHS 701Public Health Grant Writing3
SBHS 711Research Translation for Health (Offered only during odd years)3
SBHS 715Intervention Design3
SBHS 760Survey Research Methods3
SBHS 761Qualitative Research Methods (Offered only during even years)3
SBHS 763Advanced Evaluation Public Health (Offered only during odd years)3
BIOS 601Applied Biostatistics 13
BIOS 602Applied Biostatistics Lab1
BIOS 603Applied Biostatistics 23
BIOS 604Applied Biostatistics 33
EPID 601Public Health Epidemiology3
C&I 789Teaching in Higher Education3
BMS 700Scientific Integrity (and Ethics)1
BMS 720Scientific Writing2
PUBH 659Public Health Foundations3
Electives9
Graduate Seminar (taken 3 times for 1 credit)3
Graduate Seminar
Dissertation Research18
Research (Three 1-hour Research Rotations and 15 hours of Dissertation Research)
Qualifying Examination
Dissertation Proposal
Dissertation Defense
Total Hours82

Program Requirements for Students Entering with Advanced Standing

Students entering the SBHS PhD program with advanced standing will complete the minimum program requirements listed below. Additional courses may be needed depending on the student’s degree and prior coursework. Students with advanced standing will need to work with their advisor to determine their ultimate course of study.

SBHS 711Research Translation for Health3
SBHS 761Qualitative Research Methods3
SBHS 763Advanced Evaluation Public Health3
SBHS 701Public Health Grant Writing3
BIOS 603Applied Biostatistics 23
BIOS 604Applied Biostatistics 33
BMS 700Scientific Integrity1
BMS 720Scientific Writing2
C&I 789Teaching in Higher Education3
Electives9
Graduate Seminar (Taken three times for 1 credit each)3
Graduate Seminar
Dissertation Research 18
Research (Three 1-hour Research Rotations and 15 hours of Dissertation Research)
Qualifying Examination
Dissertation Proposal
Dissertation Defense
Total Hours54

Electives

Students will complete a minimum of nine credit hours of electives during their Ph.D. program. These may be selected from among the department’s, School of Public Health’s, or university’s many course offerings. These courses will be discussed and approved with the faculty advisor.    

Qualifying Examination

The Qualifying Examination is the capstone experience for Ph.D. program coursework. Successful completion of the examination signifies competence in the field of public health sciences and indicates readiness to engage in independent research. The Qualifying Examination consists of both a written and oral component. Qualifying exams should not include testing on content of the dissertation. The oral defense of the dissertation proposal will serve that purpose. The Qualifying Examination is planned and administered by the five-member dissertation committee, under the direction of the committee chairperson. If necessary and at the discretion of the Program Director, another faculty member may be appointed to serve on the committee. 

The oral portion of the exam cannot be attempted until the written component is completed and must be attempted within two academic weeks of the written component. Students are expected to take the qualifying exam during the summer sessions between their fourth and fifth academic semesters. However, the written component must be completed no later than the second week in July. Students are not eligible to begin their dissertation or enroll in dissertation hours until they have successfully completed the Qualifying Examination.

Research

Students will participate in three research rotations during their first year, meeting and working with research faculty with similar interests in order to develop mentorships for dissertation research.

The Dissertation Proposal, Defense, and Approval

Having received guidance from the dissertation committee, the formal research proposal can be developed and completed after all course work and Qualifying Examinations have been successfully completed, normally during year 3 in the program for students not on advanced standing and during year 2 in the program for students on advanced standing.  Successful passage of the dissertation research proposal constitutes admission to candidacy.    

Although students may choose to pursue a traditional dissertation format, the majority of Ph.D. students format their dissertation using the Three Journal Article Format (JAF). The decision of which format to use is something that students should discuss with chairperson of their dissertation committee.  As a reminder, students will not be allowed to defend their dissertations until they have at least one first-authored publication in any form of acceptance, based on their Ph.D. dissertation, in a peer-reviewed journal by the time of the dissertation defense. Note: This required publication does not necessarily need to be one of the three articles generated through the JAF dissertation format.

Plan of Study

Upon matriculating into the PhD program, students should contact the SBHS PhD Program Coordinator, or their advisor if already identified, to discuss the course requirements and to develop a plan of study (POS) to meet their individual needs.  Below is a suggested POS with the minimum requirements for students entering the program with a BA/BS.  Note: Research credits show below reflect the minimum requirements. Students may enroll in additional research credits as necessary to achieve the degree competencies.

Suggested plan of study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
C&I 7893BIOS 6033BMS 7202
BIOS 6013SBHS 6113 
BIOS 6021SBHS 7603 
SBHS 6103SBHS 7972 
SBHS 6013EPID 6013 
SBHS 7971  
BMS 7001  
 15 14 2
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
SBHS 7153SBHS 763 or 7613SBHS 7971
PUBH 7961SBHS 7013Qualifying Examination 
BIOS 6043PUBH 659 3 
SBHS 6133  
SBHS 7113  
 13 9 1
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
SBHS 7961SBHS 7973SBHS 7971
SBHS 7972SBHS 763 or 7613 
Electives6Elective3 
Dissertation Proposal   
 9 9 1
Fourth Year
FallHours  
SBHS 7961  
SBHS 7978  
Dissertation Defense   
 9
Total credit hours: 82

Major Learning Outcomes

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Social and Behavioral Sciences MPH Major Competencies

  • Practice community engagement principles when addressing public health problems.
  • Appraise qualitative and quantitative data used in evaluating factors associated with improving public health.
  • Employ social behavioral theories & frameworks designed to describe public health problems and improve public health interventions.
  • Recommend interventions likely to improve public health.
  • Organize interventions, including the assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health interventions.
  • Communicate effectively among diverse stakeholders.

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Competencies

  • Develop effective strategies for teaching in higher education
  • Review and synthesize pertinent literature and formulate focused research questions that address identified knowledge gaps
  • Design and conduct original research that uniquely contributes to the public health scientific knowledge
  • Disseminate research findings through appropriate peer-reviewed publications and presentations, and to other public health community audiences

Major Competencies

  • Display broad knowledge and application of relevant public health social and behavioral theories to health promotion and disease prevention strategies
  • Demonstrate rigorous understanding of methodological and statistical principles that enhance research in the public health sciences
  • Review and synthesize pertinent behavioral literature and formulate focused specific aims and research questions that address identified knowledge gaps
  • Design and conduct original research that uniquely contributes to social and behavioral science knowledge base 
  • Disseminate research findings through appropriate peer-reviewed publications and presentations and to other appropriate public health community audiences

Courses

SBHS 601. Social and Behavioral Theory. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on the role of individual behavior in attaining health. Integration of the concepts of health education and behavioral science to facilitate changes in health behavior is addressed.

SBHS 610. Public Health Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Provide students with the practical skills necessary to read, understand, critique, and contribute to the public health literature. Emphasis is placed on common research methods used in public health research.

SBHS 611. Community Assessment. 3 Hours.

Examines the nature of health and its social determinants, methodologies to conduct community health assessments, and the identification of appropriate interventions. Employs a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection and analysis.

SBHS 613. Public Health Program Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Examination of research design, methods, and practices in the assessment and evaluation of public health programs; emphasis on practical applications of program evaluation to change behavior, allocate funds, build and strengthen programs.

SBHS 614. Community-Based Participatory Research. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on initiating and conducting research projects in meaningful partnership with communities, including human research ethics and community-based participatory research elements, principles, and theories via a combination of readings, lectures, videos, and exercises.

SBHS 615. Intervention Design. 3 Hours.

PR: SBHS 601 and SBHS 610 or consent. This course will provide students with the conceptual and practical tools used in planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs. Through reading, cooperative learning, and discussing, students will gain experience in these four areas. Students will also apply information learned in foundation courses.

SBHS 616. Introduction to Public Health Interventions for Social and Behavioral Scientist. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the process of planning, developing, implementing and evaluating an effective public health intervention. Students learn tools and strategies commonly associated with excellence in the discipline in order to meet an important health need or concern relevant for a local community group.

SBHS 617. Community Engagement and Advocacy in Public Health. 2 Hours.

Addresses the roles of community engagement and advocacy as essential tools to mobilize organizational and social change. Through lecture, discussion, case studies, self-assessment, and experiential exercises, students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to engage and empower communities through participation and advocacy.

SBHS 620. Implementing and Managing Public Health Programs. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with conceptual and practical tools used for implementing and managing health promotion programs. Critical elements include learning to implement theoretically sound intervention programs with high levels of program fidelity; effectively engaging and managing human, financial, and community resources; and identifying and responding to commonly occurring opportunities and challenges. Course methods emphasize cooperative and experiential learning.

SBHS 626. Internship. 1-5 Hours.

(May be repeated for a maximum of 5 credit hours.) The internship provides students the opportunity to develop their practical skills and enhance professional competencies by applying the knowledge and techniques gained from their MPH coursework to public health practice.

SBHS 627. Practicum Proposal. 2 Hours.

Students develop a proposal for a discipline-specific practicum project (applied/research-based) integrating public health skills, theory and knowledge as the first part of the culminating experience supported by a faculty-review/mentoring process.

SBHS 628. Practicum. 3 Hours.

PR: SBHS 627 or consent. Culminating Experience: Students implement the substantive public health project (planned in proposal course) under the mentorship of faculty/preceptors. Results are reported through a formal paper and a poster presentation to faculty, students and guests.

SBHS 629. Capstone Course. 2 Hours.

This is the culminating experience for social and behavioral sciences majors in the MPH program and requires students to demonstrate their capacity to synthesize and integrate the core and SBHS departmental competencies via a paper and poster.

SBHS 630. Foundations of Wellness. 3 Hours.

Wellness is examined as a component of health promotion. A wellness lifestyle is fundamental to promoting a holistic wellness concept. Quality-of-life issues and programs are explored for a variety of audiences.

SBHS 633. Women and Violence. 3 Hours.

This course examines the issue of violence in the lives of women across the lifespan and from a sociocultural perspective. Implications for health concerns and educational interventions will be addressed.

SBHS 634. Issues in Women's Health. 3 Hours.

This course examines a broad array of health issues and causes of illness that shape and define women's access and understanding of health concerns across the lifespan, which includes examination of cultural diversity.

SBHS 660. Survey Research Methods. 3 Hours.

This course presents scientific knowledge and practical skills used in survey research. Focus is on question construction and development, questionnaire design, sampling and surveying modes, interviewing techniques, and survey data analysis.

SBHS 661. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to qualitative research methods and study designs. Includes critiques of qualitative study literature, student-driven studies using various types of study designs and how to analyze and report the results of qualitative studies. (Also listed as SBHS 761 - students may not count both this course and 761 toward degree requirements.).

SBHS 662. Issues in Men's Health. 3 Hours.

Men are markedly at risk for specific health problems and complications. This course will provide skills for student to research and develop educational programs to improve health and well-being of men.

SBHS 663. Advanced Evaluation in Public Health. 3 Hours.

PR: (BIOS 601 and SBHS 613 and EPID 617) or consent. Advanced topics will include the use of logic models, innovative approaches in evaluation, analyzing and interpreting evaluation data, the role of evaluation in shaping policy, and developmental evaluation. Didactic instruction and experiential learning will be emphasized.

SBHS 664. Public Health Advocacy. 3 Hours.

The course will introduce students to advocacy as an important tool to mobilize social and organizational change through education and community support. The course will train students to develop effective advocacy strategies, present those strategies through written and oral communication, and refine their professional skills. This course requires some amount of travel for course related activities.

SBHS 665. Grant Writing for Public Health Practice. 3 Hours.

PR: SBHS 601 and (SBHS 613 or SBHS 612). This course addresses skills and techniques necessary for writing successful grant proposals for professionals in public health agencies. This is a writing intensive course focused on grant writing and evaluation of social and behavioral based health promotion and disease prevention programs and interventions and is specifically tailored for the public health practice workforce.

SBHS 691A-B. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

SBHS 693A-B. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

SBHS 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty-supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

SBHS 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

SBHS 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent, Reaserch activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. Grading will be S/U.).

SBHS 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that believe that this level of control and supervision is needed during the writing of the students' reports, theses, or dissertations.

SBHS 701. Public Health Grant Writing. 3 Hours.

PR: SBHS 601. This course addresses various components of the grant writing process, including collaboration, funding sources, proposal preparation, and grants management for health professionals. Students will benefit from having a research methods course.

SBHS 711. Research Translation for Health. 3 Hours.

PR: SBHS 610. Principles, theories, and evidence-based methods of knowledge and research translation for health are discussed to facilitate student competence for translating research discoveries into policies and practices that promote health and prevent disease.

SBHS 715. Intervention Design. 3 Hours.

PR: SBHS 601 and SBHS 610. This course will provide students with the conceptual and practical tools used in planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs. Through reading, cooperative learning, and discussing, students will gain experience in these four areas. Students will also apply information learned in foundation courses.

SBHS 760. Survey Research Methods. 3 Hours.

This course presents scientific knowledge and practical skills used in survey research. Focus is on question construction and development, questionnaire design, sampling and survey modes, interviewing techniques, and survey data analysis. (Also listed as SBHS 660. Students may not count both SBHS 760 and SBHS 660 toward degree requirements.).

SBHS 761. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to qualitative research methods, including the various types of study design. The course will include critiques of qualitative studies in the relevant research literature as well as student-driven studies using various types of study designs. Students will also learn about analyzing and reporting the results of qualitative studies.

SBHS 763. Advanced Evaluation Public Health. 3 Hours.

PR: BIOS 601 and SBHS 613 or consent. Application of scientific public health program evaluation methods. Students will learn about theory and methods of program evaluation, identification of stakeholders, data collection, preparation, analysis, reporting and conclusion.

SBHS 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of SBHS. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience.

SBHS 791A. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced topics that are not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

SBHS 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

PR: Consent. Faculty-supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

SBHS 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

SBHS 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Will be graded S/U).


Faculty

Chair

  • Keith Zulllig, Professor - Ph.D. (University of South Carolina)

Professors

  • Linda Alexander - Ed.D. (University of Virginia)
  • Geri Dino - Ph.D. (Kansas State University)
  • Ranjita Misra - Ph.D. (Old Dominion University)

Associate Professors

  • Alfgeir Kristjansson - Ph.D. (Karolinska Institute)
  • Michael Mann - Ph.D. (University of Florida)

Assistant Professors

  • Christiaan Abildso - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Danielle Davidov - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Megan Smith - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Nancy O'Hara Tompkins - Ph.D. (University of Maryland)

Teaching Assistant Professor

  • Janet B. Hunt - MPH (University of Tennessee)
  • Toni Morris - Ed.D., M.S. (West Virginia University)
  • Roberta Sykes - M.S. (West Virginia University)

Adjunct Professors

  • Ahmed Aboraya - MD (Cairo University)
  • Lesley Cottrell - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Dwight Harshbarger - Ph.D. (University of North Dakota)
  • Samuel Zizzi - Ed.D. (West Virginia University)

Adjunct Associate Professors

  • Joy Buck - Ph.D. (University of Virginia)
  • Cindy Fitch - Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)

Adjunct Assistant Professors

  • Judith Sedgeman - Ed.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Melissa Olfert - Ph.D. (Loma Linda University)
  • Thomas Sims - M.A. (Georgia State University)

Adjunct Instructor

  • Janie Leary - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Janet Reger-Nash - M.S. (University of California)
  • Gary Sams - M.S. (University of Pittsburgh)
  • Gina Sharps - MPH (West Virginia University)
  • Matthew West - MBA (Duke University)

Research Assistant Professors

  • Adam Baus - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Traci Jarrett - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Cecil Pollard - M.A. (West Virginia University)

Faculty Emeriti

  • William Reger-Nash - Ed.D. (West Virginia University)
  • Pete Shaffron - Ed.D.
  • Kenneth Simon - Ed.D. (Columbia University)