Computer Engineering

http://www.lcsee.statler.wvu.edu/

Nature of Program

Computer engineers design, develop, test, and oversee the manufacture and maintenance of embedded computer hardware and software.  As such, the computer engineer is part electrical engineer and part computer scientist.  Embedded computer systems include applications in the automotive, communications, radio and television, consumer electronics, aircraft, robotics, and health-care industries.  In addition, computer engineers design, develop, test, manufacture, and maintain complex systems including digital communications systems such as cell phone networks, computer networks such as the Internet, and system-level software such as operating systems and applications software.  The computer engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Program Educational Objectives

The Program Educational Objectives (PEO) of the Computer Engineering (CpE) program at West Virginia University is to produce graduates who will apply their knowledge and skills to achieve success in their careers in industry, research, government service or graduate study. It is expected that in the first five years after graduation our graduates will achieve success and proficiency in their profession, be recognized as leaders, and contribute to the well-being of society. 

Student Outcomes

Upon graduation, all Bachelor of Science students in Computer Engineering will have the: 

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Fundamental courses in the computer engineering areas of hardware and software are taken during the second year with general fundamental engineering courses included.  The third and fourth years in the curriculum concentrate on areas of computer engineering in both software and hardware with technical electives provided to allow the student to acquire more depth in a preferred area of expertise.

The computer engineering technical electives must be taken from 400-level CPE regular courses.  The other technical electives should be selected from upper division regular courses in biometric systems, computer engineering, computer science, or electrical engineering.  However, students with special career objectives can petition the department through their advisors for prior written permission to select technical electives from upper-division courses in mathematics, the sciences, or other areas of engineering.

A total of five humanities and social science electives (GEF electives) must be selected.  The humanities and social science electives must be chosen so as to meet the University General Education Foundations requirements and Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology accreditation guidelines.

Curriculum in Computer Engineering

General Education FOUNDATIONS

Please use this link to view a list of courses that meet each GEF requirement.

NOTE: Some major requirements will fulfill specific GEF requirements. Please see the curriculum requirements listed below for details on which GEFs you will need to select.

General Education Foundations
F1 - Composition & Rhetoric3-6
Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric
and Composition, Rhetoric, and Research
Accelerated Academic Writing
F2A/F2B - Science & Technology4-6
F3 - Math & Quantitative Skills3-4
F4 - Society & Connections3
F5 - Human Inquiry & the Past3
F6 - The Arts & Creativity3
F7 - Global Studies & Diversity3
F8 - Focus (may be satisfied by completion of a minor, double major, or dual degree)9
Total Hours31-37

Curriculum Requirements

To receive a bachelor of science in computer engineering, a student must meet the University’s undergraduate degree requirements, take all the courses indicated below, and attain a grade point average of 2.0 or better for all Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering courses. If a Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering is repeated, only the last grade received is used to compute the major grade point average, and the course credit hours are counted only once. This requirement assures that the student has demonstrated overall competence in the major.

Freshman Engineering Requirements
ENGR 101Engineering Problem Solving 12
Engineering Problem Solving:3
Introduction to Chemical Engineering
Engineering Problem-Solving 2
Introduction to Nanotechnology Design
Introduction to Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Design
ENGR 199Orientation to Engineering1
Non-Computer Engineering Core
CHEM 115Fundamentals of Chemistry (GEF 2B)4
ECON 201Principles of Microeconomics (GEF 4)3
ECON 202Principles of Macroeconomics3
Calculus I (GEF 3):4
Calculus 1 (Minimum grade of C- is required)
Calculus 1a with Precalculus
and Calculus 1b with Precalculus (Minimum grade of C- is required)
MATH 156Calculus 2 (GEF 8 - Minimum grade of C- is required)4
MATH 251Multivariable Calculus (Minimum grade of C- is required)4
MATH 261Elementary Differential Equations4
MATH 375Applied Modern Algebra3
PHYS 111General Physics (GEF 8)4
PHYS 112General Physics (GEF 8)4
STAT 215Introduction to Probability and Statistics3
Engineering Science Elective (Choose one)3
Material and Energy Balances 1
Materials Science
Engineering Economy
Statics
Thermodynamics
Computer Engineering Core Requirements (Minimum GPA of 2.0 required in BIOM, CPE, CS, and EE courses)
CPE 271Introduction to Digital Logic Design3
CPE 272Digital Logic Laboratory1
CPE 310Microprocessor Systems3
CPE 311Microprocessor Laboratory1
CPE 312Microcomputer Structures and Interfacing3
CPE 313Microcomputer Structures and Interfacing Laboratory1
CPE 480Senior Design Seminar (Fulfills Writing and Communications Skills Requirement)2
CPE 481Senior Design Project3
CS 110Introduction to Computer Science4
CS 111Introduction to Data Structures4
CS 230Introduction to Software Engineering4
CS 350Computer System Concepts3
CS 450Operating Systems Structures3
EE 221Introduction to Electrical Engineering3
EE 222Introduction to Electrical Engineering Laboratory1
EE 223Electrical Circuits3
EE 224Electrical Circuits Laboratory1
EE 251Digital Electronics3
EE 252Digital Electronics Laboratory1
EE 327Signals and Systems 13
EE 355Analog Electronics3
EE 356Analog Electronics Laboratory1
CPE Technical Elective (400-level course in Computer Engineering)3
Technical Electives (300 level or higher course in Biometric Systems, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, or Electrical Engineering)6
Free Elective3
GEF Electives 1, 5, 6, 715
Total Hours130

Suggested Plan of Study

It is important for students to take courses in the order specified as much as possible; all prerequisites and concurrent requirements must be observed.  A typical B.S.Cp.E. degree program that completes degree requirements in four years is as follows. 

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
MATH 155 (GEF 3)4MATH 156 (GEF 8)4
ENGR 1012ENGR 1023
ENGR 1991PHYS 111 (GEF 8)4
CHEM 115 (GEF 2)4GEF 63
ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3GEF 73
GEF 53 
 17 17
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CPE 2713CS 1104
CPE 2721EE 223*3
EE 2213EE 224*1
EE 2221EE 2513
MATH 2514EE 252*1
PHYS 112 (GEF 8)4ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3
 MATH 2614
 16 19
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CPE 3103CPE 312*3
CPE 3111CPE 313*1
CS 1114CS 2304
EE 327*3CS 3503
EE 355*3ECON 201 (GEF 4)3
EE 356*1STAT 2153
MATH 3753 
 18 17
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CPE 4802CPE 4813
CS 4503Engr. Science Elective3
ECON 2023CPE Tech. Elective3
Free Elective3Tech. Elective3
Tech. Elective3 
 14 12
Total credit hours: 130
*

Offered once per year in the semester shown.

Major Learning Goals

computer engineering

Program Educational Objectives

The Program Educational Objectives (PEO) of the Computer Engineering (CpE) program at West Virginia University is to produce graduates who will apply their knowledge and skills to achieve success in their careers in industry, research, government service or graduate study. It is expected that in the first five years after graduation our graduates will achieve success and proficiency in their profession, be recognized as leaders, and contribute to the well-being of society. 

Student Outcomes

Upon graduation, all Bachelor of Science students in Computer Engineering will have: 

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Courses

CPE 271. Introduction to Digital Logic Design. 3 Hours.

PR: MATH 156 or consent. An introduction to the design of digital networks and computers. Topics include number systems, coding, Boolean and switching algebra, logic design, minimization of logic, sequential networks, and design on digital subsystems. (3 hr. lec.).

CPE 272. Digital Logic Laboratory. 1 Hour.

CoReq: CPE 271. Experiments with digital electronic circuits including number systems, design and application of modern digital circuitry for both combinational and sequential logic circuits. (3 hr. lab.).

CPE 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CPE 310. Microprocessor Systems. 3 Hours.

PR: CPE 271 and CPE 272 and PR or CONC: CPE 311. Theory and design of microprocessors: organization and architecture of modern processors; integration of microprocessors with RAM, ROM, and I/O devices; machine language, assembly language and software development. (3 hr. lec.).

CPE 311. Microprocessor Laboratory. 1 Hour.

CoReq: CPE 310. Machine language, assembly language and hardware and software interfacing. (This includes editing, linking, and debugging.) Memory, I/O and basic techniques of microprocessor interfacing. (3 hr. lab.).

CPE 312. Microcomputer Structures and Interfacing. 3 Hours.

PR: CPE 310 and CPE 311 and EE 251 and EE 252 and CoReg: CPE 313 and CS 350. Design of computer systems with emphasis on interface hardware including communications, high power interface devices, line driver/receiver circuits, A/D and D/A devices, and utilization of software techniques for programmed, interrupt, and direct memory access. (3 hr. lec.).

CPE 313. Microcomputer Structures and Interfacing Laboratory. 1 Hour.

PR: CPE 310 and CPE 311 and CoReq: CPE 312. A microprocessor based single-board computer is designed and built. A semester project is required using standard I/O techniques. (3 hr. lab.).

CPE 393A. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled classes.

CPE 435. Computer Incident Response. 3 Hours.

PR: CPE 310 and CPE 311 and CS 350 or consent. Introduction to computer incident response, forensics, and computer security. Legal basis, proper procedures, and multiple operating systems application.

CPE 442. Introduction to Digital Computer Architecture. 3 Hours.

PR: MATH 375 and CPE 310 and CPE 311. Control, data, and demand-driven computer architecture; parallel processing, pipelining, and vector processing; structures and algorithms for array processors, systolic architectures, design of architectures. (3 hr. lec.).

CPE 450. Introduction to Microelectronics Circuits. 3 Hours.

PR: EE 251. (VLSI-Very Large Scale Integrated) circuit design, including layout, simulation and performance optimization of basic digital logic functions and combinations of such basic functions into more complex digital system functions. CAD tools are used for projects. (3 hr. lec.).

CPE 462. Wireless Networking. 3 Hours.

PR: EE 327 and STAT 215. Design and analysis of modern wireless data networks. Digital modulation techniques, wireless channel models, design of cellular networks, spread spectrum, carrier sense multiple access, ad-hoc networks routing, error control coding, automatic request strategies.

CPE 480. Senior Design Seminar. 2 Hours.

PR: ENGL 102 and consent. Penultimate semester group senior design projects with individual design assignments appropriate to student's discipline. Complete system-level designs of the subsequent semester's project presented in written proposals and oral presentations. (Equivalent to BIOM 480, CS 480, and EE 480). (2 hr. lec., 1 hr. conf.).

CPE 481. Senior Design Project. 3 Hours.

PR: CPE 480. Continuation of CPE 480. Detailed design and implementation of the system including choice of components, algorithm development, interfacing troubleshooting, working in groups, and project management. Also covers professional topics, including ethics, liability, safety, socio-legal issues, risks and employment agreements. (1 hr. lec., 1 hr. conf., 2 hr. lab.).

CPE 484. Real-Time Systems Development. 3 Hours.

PR: CS 350 or working knowledge of C programming language and UNIX. Characteristics of real-time systems, system and software development standards, structured and object oriented development methods for real-time systems, using a computer aided software engineering (CASE) tool in the development of a large engineering project. Emphasis is on real-time systems requirements analysis and design. This is a project based course. (3 hr. lec.).

CPE 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

CPE 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

CPE 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CPE 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

CPE 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CPE 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

CPE 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.