Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

http://www.cee.statler.wvu.edu/

E-mail: Statler-CEE@mail.wvu.edu

Degree Offered

  • Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (B.S.C.E.)

Civil Engineering

Civil engineering historically encompassed all engineering endeavors needed to provide the infrastructure for society to function.  Because of its origin and history, civil engineering still embraces a wide variety of technological areas.  These include:

  • Construction engineering
  • Geotechnical engineering
  • Hydro-technical engineering
  • Structural engineering
  • Transportation engineering
  • Water and Environmental engineering

Civil engineers work with problems that directly impact the health and economic vitality of people and communities. These problems include waste disposal, environmental pollution, transportation systems analysis and design, water resource development, and the design, construction, and rehabilitation of constructed facilities such as dams, bridges, buildings, and highways.

Thus, the challenges and opportunities for a civil engineer lie in combining technical competence with a human concern for the applications of technology.  To help students to understand their role in the community, to be effective in working with design teams involving other engineers and other professionals, and to be effective in written and spoken communications, the curriculum attempts to give a meaningful educational experience in the humanities, social studies, English, and economics.

The goal of the undergraduate curriculum in civil engineering is to prepare graduate civil engineers to meet the present and the future infrastructural and environmental needs of society.  This requires an education based on scientific and engineering fundamentals as well as one that incorporates experience in engineering design using modern technology.  Because the systems they design impact the public directly, civil engineers must be aware of the social and environmental consequences of their designs.  Graduates must be prepared to work and communicate with other professionals in a variety of associations and organizations.  Ethics and life-long learning are essential components in the education of civil engineers.

During the course of study, civil engineering students are given a solid grounding in mathematics, physics, and chemistry.  Added to this is extensive development of the fundamentals of materials science, construction, water and environmental, soils, structural, and transportation systems engineering.  This broad base of knowledge is provided to assure that civil engineers are educated in all branches of the profession and to permit continuous learning throughout a professional lifetime.  Throughout the program, each student works with an academic advisor in the selection of electives.  Specialization in one or more of the branches of civil engineering is possible by selection of a sequence of technical electives during the junior and senior years.

Program Educational Objectives

  • The graduates will be successful in their professional careers as civil engineers in industry, public agencies, and/or post-graduate education.
  • The graduates will continue to develop professionally and serve in leadership roles.
  • The graduates will be successful in demonstrating their obligations to the profession, to their employer, and to society.

Student Outcomes

Upon graduation, all Bachelor of Science students in Civil Engineering will have:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • An ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Curriculum in Civil Engineering

General Education FOUNDATIONS

Please use this link to view a list of courses that meet each GEF requirement.

NOTE: Some major requirements will fulfill specific GEF requirements. Please see the curriculum requirements listed below for details on which GEFs you will need to select.

General Education Foundations
F1 - Composition & Rhetoric3-6
Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric
and Composition, Rhetoric, and Research
Accelerated Academic Writing
F2A/F2B - Science & Technology4-6
F3 - Math & Quantitative Skills3-4
F4 - Society & Connections3
F5 - Human Inquiry & the Past3
F6 - The Arts & Creativity3
F7 - Global Studies & Diversity3
F8 - Focus (may be satisfied by completion of a minor, double major, or dual degree)9
Total Hours31-37

Curriculum Requirements

To receive a degree of bachelor of science in civil engineering, a student must meet the University's undergraduate degree requirements, take all the courses indicated below, and attain a GPA of 2.0 or better in all civil engineering courses. If a civil engineering course is repeated, only the last grade received is used to compute the major GPA, and the course credit hours are counted only once. This requirement assures that the student has demonstrated overall competence in the major. 

Undergraduate Student Minimum Performance Policy 

All civil and environmental engineering students at WVU, including transfer students and second degree students, must complete each tracking course with a grade of C- or better, with the exception that one D- in a course taken at WVU is permitted. Any tracking course transferred from outside of WVU must be a C- or better. Only the following civil engineering courses may be taken prior to completion of the minimum performance policy: CE 201CE 210CE 305CE 332CE 347.

Freshman Engineering Requirements
ENGR 101Engineering Problem Solving 12
Engineering Problem Solving:3
Introduction to Chemical Engineering
Engineering Problem-Solving 2
Introduction to Nanotechnology Design
Introduction to Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Design
ENGR 199Orientation to Engineering1
Required Tracking Courses (minimum grade of C- required) *
Calculus I (GEF 3):4
Calculus 1
Calculus 1a with Precalculus
and Calculus 1b with Precalculus
MATH 156Calculus 2 (GEF 8)4
MATH 251Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 261Elementary Differential Equations4
CHEM 115Fundamentals of Chemistry (GEF 2B)4
PHYS 111General Physics (GEF 8)4
MAE 241Statics3
MAE 242Dynamics3
MAE 243Mechanics of Materials3
Other Required Courses
CE 201Introduction to Civil Engineering1
CE 210Introduction to Computer Aided Design and Drafting for Civil Engineers2
CE 301Engineering Professional Development1
CE 321Fluid Mechanics for Civil Engineers3
CE 479Integrated Civil Engineering Design-Capstone3
ECON 201Principles of Microeconomics3
ENGL 305Technical Writing (Fulfills Writing and Communications Skills Requirement)3
IENG 377Engineering Economy3
STAT 215Introduction to Probability and Statistics3
Choose one of the following (GEF 8):4
General Physics
Fundamentals of Chemistry
Principles of Biology
Civil Engineering Core Courses
CE 332Introduction to Transportation Engineering4
CE 347Introduction to Environmental Engineering4
CE 351Introductory Soil Mechanics4
CE 361Structural Analysis 14
CE Design Electives6
Choose two of the following:
Pavement Design
Flexible Pavements
Highway Engineering
Traffic Engineering and Operations
Environmental Engineering Design
Foundation Engineering
Earthwork Design
Reinforced Concrete Design
Steel Design
Timber Design
Conceptual Design of Structures
CE Open Electives: **
Choose five of the following:15
Introduction to Geomatics
Civil Engineering Materials
Hydrotechnical Engineering
Concrete and Aggregates
Construction Methods
Construction Engineering
Advanced Concrete Materials
Computational Fluid Mechanics
Engineering Hydology
Water Resources Engineering
Urban Transportation Planning and Design
Railway Engineering
Pedestrian/Bike Transportation
Environmental Science and Technology
Properties of Air Pollutants
Structural Analysis 2
Independent Study
Research
Managing Construction Safety
Engineering/Math/Science Electives ***
Choose three of the following: 9
Introductory Analytical Chemistry
Organic Chemistry: Brief Course
General Microbiology
Environmental Microbiology
Geographic Information Systems and Science
Structural Geology for Engineers
Environmental Geochemistry
Computer Applications in Industrial Engineering
Introduction to Operations Research
Human Factors Engineering
Simulation by Digital Methods
Analysis-Engineering Systems
Thermodynamics
Incompressible Aerodynamics
Heat Transfer
Engineering Acoustics
Mechanics of Composite Materials
Bioengineering
Introduction to Linear Algebra
Applied Modern Algebra
Numerical Analysis 1
Applied Linear Algebra
Complex Variables
Partial Differential Equations
Coal Mining
Mineral Property Evaluation
Theoretical Mechanics 1
Intermediate Statistical Methods
Introductory Design and Analysis
Sampling Methods
Additional Requirements
General Science Elective (Select One) 3
Principles of Soil Science
and Principles of Soil Science Laboratory
General Biology
and General Biology Laboratory
General Biology
and General Biology Laboratory
Organic Chemistry
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Environmental Biology
Principles of Biology
Biometry
Freshwater Ecology
Fundamentals of Chemistry
Introduction to Computer Science
General Microbiology
Environmental Microbiology
Geographic Information Systems and Science
Global Environmental Change
Introduction to Remote Sensing
Environmental Geoscience
Physical Oceanography
Structural Geology for Engineers
General Physics
Introduction to Mathematical Physics
Introductory Electronics
Introductory Modern Physics
Optics
Theoretical Mechanics 1
Electricity and Magnetism 1
Engineering Elective (outside CEE Dept:) Any 200, 300, 400 level Statler College course not otherwise used- except Civil Engineering courses, Computer Science courses and IENG 213.3
GEF Electives 1, 5, 6, 715
Total Hours132
*

One D- is permitted. Any tracking course transferred from outside of WVU must be a C- or better. When a course is repeated, the last grade earned in that course will be used for determining compliance with this minimum grade standard.  

**

Any CE Design Electives that are not otherwise used can also be used.

***

Any CE 400 level course not otherwise used can also be used.

Suggested Plan of Study 

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
MATH 155 (GEF 3)4MATH 156 (GEF 8)4
ENGR 1012ENGR 1023
ENGR 1991PHYS 111 (GEF 8)4
CHEM 115 (GEF 2)4GEF 63
ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3GEF 73
GEF 53 
 17 17
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
MAE 2413MAE 2433
MATH 2514MAE 2423
CE 2102MATH 2614
CE 2011ENGL 3053
ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3Select one of the following:4
Select one of the following (GEF 8):4 
  
  
  
 17 17
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CE 3213CE Core Class4
Two CE Core Classes8CE 3011
STAT 2153Two CE Open Electives6
ECON 201 (GEF 4)3CE Design Elective3
 ENGR/MATH/Science Elective3
 17 17
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CE Design Elective3CE Open Elective3
Two CE Open Electives6CE 4793
General Science Elective3Two ENGR/MATH/Science Electives6
IENG 3773ENGR Elective (outside CEE Dept.)3
 15 15
Total credit hours: 132

Major Learning Goals

civil engineering

Program Educational Objectives

  • The graduates will be successful in their professional careers as civil engineers in industry, public agencies, and/or post-graduate education.
  • The graduates will continue to develop professionally and serve in leadership roles.
  • The graduates will be successful in demonstrating their obligations to the profession, to their employer, and to society.

Student Outcomes

Upon graduation, all Bachelor of Science students in Civil Engineering will have:

A. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.

B. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.

C. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.

D. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.

E. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.

F. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.

G. An ability to communicate effectively.

H. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.

I. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

J. A knowledge of contemporary issues.

K. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Curriculum for a Dual Degree in Mining Engineering and Civil Engineering

This curriculum allows students to simultaneously pursue B.S. degrees in mining engineering and civil engineering by completing additional courses. A suggested schedule for the dual curriculum in mining engineering and civil engineering is shown below.

To receive the degrees of bachelor of science in mining engineering and bachelor of science in civil engineering, a student must take all of the courses indicated below and achieve a grade point average of 2.0 or better for all civil engineering courses attempted and a grade point average of 2.25 in all mining engineering courses attempted, except for those courses in which a grade of W was received. If a course is repeated, only the last grade received is counted in computing the grade point average, and the course credit hours are counted only once. This requirement assures that the student has demonstrated overall competence in the chosen major.

Undergraduate Student Minimum Performance Policy

All civil engineering students at WVU, including transfer students, second-degree students, and dual degree students must complete each tracking course with a grade of C or better, with the exception that one D among them is permitted (a transfer course(s) with a grade of D does not satisfy the minimum performance requirement). When a course is repeated, the last grade earned in that course will be used for determining compliance with this minimum performance policy. Only the following Civil Engineering courses may be taken prior to completion of the minimum performance policy: CE 201, CE 210, CE 305, CE 332, and CE 347.

Any tracking course transferred from outside of WVU must be a C or better.

All tracking courses must be completed collectively before taking any 300-level or higher civil engineering course. However, as an exception to the collective prerequisite requirement, geomatics (CE 305), environmental engineering (CE 347), and transportation engineering (CE 332) may be taken before completing all tracking courses.

Second-degree students may petition for a waiver to the collective prerequisite requirement for 300-level or higher civil engineering courses but must meet individual course prerequisites. The petition must include a plan for completing the tracking courses and be approved by the student’s academic advisor and the department chairman.

It is important for the students take courses in the order specified as much as possible; all prerequisites and concurrent requirements must be observed. A typical dual B.S.Min.E and B.S.C.E. degree program that completes degree requirements in five years is as follows. 

Mining/Civil Engineering Curriculum Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of 152 credit hours to graduate - the total at the bottom reflects all possible course combinations.
Tracking Courses
CHEM 115Fundamentals of Chemistry (GEF 2)4
MAE 241Statics3
MAE 242Dynamics3
MAE 243Mechanics of Materials3
Select one of the following (GEF 3):4
Calculus 1
Calculus 1a with Precalculus
and Calculus 1b with Precalculus
MATH 156Calculus 2 (GEF 8)4
MATH 251Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 261Elementary Differential Equations4
PHYS 111General Physics (GEF 8)4
Required Courses
CE 201Introduction to Civil Engineering1
CE 301Engineering Professional Development1
CE 321Fluid Mechanics for Civil Engineers3
CE 322Hydrotechnical Engineering3
CE 479Integrated Civil Engineering Design-Capstone3
ECON 201Principles of Microeconomics (GEF 4)3
ENGR 101Engineering Problem Solving 12
ENGR 102Engineering Problem-Solving 23
ENGR 199Orientation to Engineering1
GEOL 101Planet Earth3
GEOL 102Planet Earth Laboratory1
GEOL 342Structural Geology for Engineers3
IENG 377Engineering Economy3
MAE 320Thermodynamics3
MINE 201Mine Surveying3
MINE 205Underground Mining Systems3
MINE 206Surface Mining Systems4
MINE 261Engineering Computer Aided Design2
MINE 306Mineral Property Evaluation3
MINE 331Mine Ventilation3
MINE 382Mine Power Systems3
MINE 411Rock Mechanics/Ground Control4
MINE 427Coal Preparation4
MINE 471Mine and Safety Management3
MINE 480Multidisciplinary Team Project1
MINE 483Mine Design-Exploration Mapping2
MINE 484Mine Design-Report Capstone4
PHYS 112General Physics (GEF 8)4
STAT 215Introduction to Probability and Statistics3
Civil Engineering Core Courses
CE 332Introduction to Transportation Engineering4
CE 347Introduction to Environmental Engineering4
CE 351Introductory Soil Mechanics4
CE 361Structural Analysis 14
Civil Engineering Design Electives
Select from the following:6
Pavement Design
Flexible Pavements
Environmental Engineering Design
Foundation Engineering
Earthwork Design
Reinforced Concrete Design
Steel Design
Timber Design
Conceptual Design of Structures
Civil Engineering Electives
Select from the following:3
Introduction to Geomatics
Civil Engineering Materials
Concrete and Aggregates
Construction Methods
Construction Engineering
Advanced Concrete Materials
Computational Fluid Mechanics
Engineering Hydology
Water Resources Engineering
Urban Transportation Planning and Design
Railway Engineering
Pedestrian/Bike Transportation
Environmental Science and Technology
Properties of Air Pollutants
Structural Analysis 2
CE 493 course (approved by Advisor)
Independent Study
Managing Construction Safety
GEF Electives 1, 5, 6, 715
Total Hours152

Back to Top

MINE and CE Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHEM 115 (GEF 2)4ENGR 1023
ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3GEOL 1013
ENGR 1012GEOL 1021
ENGR 1991MATH 156 (GEF 8)4
MATH 155 (GEF 3)4PHYS 111 (GEF 8)4
 14 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CE 2011ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3
MAE 2413MAE 2423
MATH 2514MATH 2614
MINE 2013MINE 2064
MINE 2053PHYS 112 (GEF 8)4
MINE 2612 
 16 18
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CE 3213Two CE Core Courses*8
GEOL 3423MINE 3313
MAE 2433MINE 4274
MAE 3203MINE 4801
STAT 2153 
 15 16
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
Two CE Core Courses*8CE 3011
MINE 3063Two CE Design Electives**6
MINE 3823CE 3223
 GEF Elective 63
 IENG 3773
 14 16
Fifth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
GEF Elective 53CE Open Elective***3
ECON 201 (GEF 4)3CE 4793
MINE 4114GEF Elective 73
MINE 4713MINE 4844
MINE 4832 
 15 13
Total credit hours: 152
*

CE Core Classes: CE 332, CE 347, CE 351, CE 361

**

CE Design Electives—any approved CE 400-level design course. See advisor for approved list

***

CE Open Electives—any approved CE 300 or CE 400-level course. See advisor for approved list.

Notes: Discipline substitutions:

Courses

CE 200. Land Surveying. 3 Hours.

PR: MATH 128. Introduction to current surveying methods and equipment as applied to mapping projects and simple construction layout. Leveling, angles and directions, distance measurements, and fundamental traverse calculations along with mapping principles are emphasized.

CE 201. Introduction to Civil Engineering. 1 Hour.

PR: ENGR 102. Overview of civil engineering disciplines and careers including structural, environmental, hydrotechnical, geotechnical and transportation engineering. Addresses the technical concepts and career opportunities in each area. Emphasis on providing guidance for success in completing undergraduate studies.

CE 202. Concrete Canoe/Steel Bridge Design and Construction. 1 Hour.

Students participate in the concrete canoe and/or steel bridge design and construction for competition in the annual American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Virginias' Conference.

CE 210. Introduction to Computer Aided Design and Drafting for Civil Engineers. 2 Hours.

PR: ENGR 102 or consent. An introduction to computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) software for communicating design plans and specifications for civil and environmental engineering projects.

CE 273. American Society of Civil Engineers Workshop. 1 Hour.

The course provides a formal structure for meeting and conducting activities necessary to compete in competitions such as the concrete canoe, steel bridge, technical problem solving, and surveying. It does not satisfy any graduation requirement.

CE 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CE 301. Engineering Professional Development. 1 Hour.

Non-technical issues facing graduate engineers; career paths, job search, professional registration, legal issues, engineering ethics, professional societies, and life-long learning.

CE 305. Introduction to Geomatics. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 210 or consent. Introduction to the theory and practice of the technologies used to measure, calculate, acquire, process, and display terrain and other data for use in mapping, planning, designing, constructing, and managing the built and natural environments. (2 - 75-minute periods.).

CE 310. Civil Engineering Materials. 3 Hours.

PR: MAE 243. Physical, chemical, and molecular properties of materials commonly used in civil engineering works. Influence of these properties on the performance and use of materials.

CE 321. Fluid Mechanics for Civil Engineers. 3 Hours.

PR: MATH 261 and MAE 242. Fluid properties, statics, and kinematics; conservation laws for mass, momentum, and mechanical energy; piezometric head and grade lines; dimensional analysis and similitude; weir and orifice flow; introduction to flow in pipes and open channels. (3 hr. lecture.).

CE 322. Hydrotechnical Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 321. Flow in pipes and pipe networks; pumps; uniform and gradually varied open channel flow; design of water distribution, sanitary sewer, and storm water collection systems. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 332. Introduction to Transportation Engineering. 4 Hours.

Integrated transportation systems from the standpoint of assembly, haul, and distribution means. Analysis of transport equipment and traveled way. Power requirements, speed, stopping, capacity, economics, and route location. Future technological developments and innovations. (3 hr. lec., 3 hr. lab.).

CE 347. Introduction to Environmental Engineering. 4 Hours.

PR: Consent. Introduction to physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of waters and wastewaters, and fundamental principles of water and wastewater treatment including hands-on laboratory exercises. (3 hr. lec., 2 hr. lab.).

CE 351. Introductory Soil Mechanics. 4 Hours.

PR: MAE 243. Introduction to geotechnical engineering,fundamental soil properties, classification of soils, soil compaction, permeability, compressibility, and consolidation of soils, shear strength, lateral earth pressures. (3 hr. lec., 3 hr. lab.).

CE 361. Structural Analysis 1. 4 Hours.

PR: MAE 243 or consent. Stability, determinacy, and equilibrium of structures; shear and bending moment diagrams of determinate and indeterminate beams and frames; analysis of trusses; displacement of planar structures by geometric and energy methods. (3 hr. lec., 3 hr. lab.).

CE 393. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CE 411. Pavement Design. 3 Hours.

PR: MAE 243. Effects of traffic, soil, environment, and loads on the design and behavior of pavement. Design of pavement structures. Pavement performance and performance surveys.

CE 412. Concrete and Aggregates. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 310 or consent. Considerations and methods for the design of concrete mixes. Properties of portland cement and aggregates and their influence on the design and performance of concrete mixtures. Testing of concrete and aggregate and the significance of these tests. (2 hr. lec., 3 hr. lab.).

CE 413. Construction Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: Junior or senior standing in civil engineering. Study of construction methods, equipment, and administration with particular emphasis on the influence of new developments in technology. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 414. Construction Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: Senior standing. Introduce student to the role of the civil engineer in the construction process, including critical path analysis, productivity estimation, equipment capability and selection.

CE 415. Flexible Pavements. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 310. Design, construction and maintenance of flexible pavements, including material characterization, mix design, construction methods, pavement design and evaluation, and maintenance procedures.

CE 416. Advanced Concrete Materials. 3 Hours.

PR: MAE 243. Microstructure and properties of portland cement pastes, rheology, maturity, strength properties, non-linear fracture mechanics, early age volume changes, creep and shrinkage models, transport mechanism and durability of concrete, special concretes. ( 3 hr. lec.).

CE 420. Computational Fluid Mechanics. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 321 and ENGR 102 or consent. Use of the computer in elementary hydraulics, open channel flow, potential flow, and boundary layer flow, numerical techniques for solution of algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and partial differential equations. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 425. Engineering Hydology. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 321 or consent. Scientific basis of the hydrologic cycle and its engineering implications; rainfall-runoff processes, hydrographs, flood routing, and statistical methods. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 427. Water Resources Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 425. Application of hydrologic and hydraulic principles in the design and analysis of water resource systems; probability concepts and economics in water resource planning, water law, reservoir operations, hydraulic structures, flood damage mitigation, hydroelectric power, and drainage. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 431. Highway Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 332 and CE 351. Highway administration, economics and finance; planning and design; subgrade soils and drainage; construction and maintenance. Design of a highway. Center line and grade line projections, earthwork and cost estimates. (2 hr. lec., 3 hr. lab.).

CE 433. Urban Transportation Planning and Design. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 332 or consent. Principles of planning and physical design of transportation systems for different parts of the urban area. Land use, social, economic, and environmental compatibilities emphasized. Evaluation and impact assessment. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 435. Railway Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 205. Development and importance of the railroad industry. Location, construction, operation, and maintenance. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 436. Pedestrian/Bike Transportation. 3 Hours.

Planning, design, operation and maintenance of pedestrian and bicycle facilities, including multi-use trails; policies to encourage non-motorized travel; traffic calming; accessibility and ADA requirements; connections to transit.

CE 439. Traffic Engineering and Operations. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 332. Driver and vehicular characteristics, horizontal and vertical curve design, traffic flow theory, analysis of traffic engineering data, traffic engineering studies, traffic signal analysis and design.

CE 442. Environmental Aerosol Science. 3 Hours.

This course will give an understanding of the basic principles behind aerosol generation, measurement, mechanics, and toxicity for aerosols found in the environment.

CE 443. Environmental Science and Technology. 3 Hours.

PR: Engineering major. Issues of global atmospheric change, minimization and control of hazardous wastes, groundwater contamination, water pollution, air pollution, solid waste control, and management of water and energy resources. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 445. Properties of Air Pollutants. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Physical, chemical, and biological behavioral properties of dusts, droplets, and gases in the atmosphere. Air pollutant sampling and analysis. Planning and operating air pollution surveys. (2 hr. lec., 3 hr. lab.).

CE 447. Environmental Engineering Design. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 347. Process design of treatment/remediation systems; comparison of alternatives and preliminary cost evaluation. (2 hr. lec., 3 hr. lab.).

CE 451. Foundation Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 351. Subsurface investigations and synthesis of soil parameters for geotechnical design and analysis, concepts of shallow and deep foundation design, geotechnical design of conventional retaining walls, computerized analysis and design of soil/foundation interaction; case histories. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 453. Earthwork Design. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 351. Use of soil mechanics principles in the analysis, design and construction of earth structures. Principles of compaction and compaction control; an introduction to slope stability analysis and landslides; earth reinforcement systems, and ground improvement techniques. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 454. Geotechnical Engineering Field Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 351. Soil exploration and groundwater sampling; in-situ determination of properties using split spoon, cone, dilatometer, pressure meter, and vane equipment. Instrumentation for monitoring field performance and challenges associated with exploration and monitoring in geotechnical/geoenvironmental engineering. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 461. Structural Analysis 2. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 361 or consent. Fundamental theory of statically indeterminate structures; analysis of indeterminate beams, frames, and trusses by stiffness and flexibility methods; study of influence lines for beams, frames, and trusses. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 462. Reinforced Concrete Design. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 361. Behavior and design of reinforced concrete members. Material properties, design methods and safety consideration, flexure, shear, bond and anchorage, combined flexure and axial load, footings, introduction to torsion slender columns, and pre-stressed concrete.

CE 463. Steel Design. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 361. Material properties, design of steel bridge and building systems with emphasis on connections, beams, columns, plastic design, and cost estimates.

CE 464. Timber Design. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 361. Fundamentals of modern timber design and analysis. Topics include wood properties, design of beams, columns, trusses, and other structures using dimension lumber, glue-laminated products and composites.

CE 465. Conceptual Design of Structures. 3 Hours.

PR: CE 361 or consent. Classification, function, and conceptual analytical understanding of structural systems and components; design codes and modeling of loads; behavior of components and systems; design principles of structural systems. (3 hr. lec.).

CE 479. Integrated Civil Engineering Design-Capstone. 3 Hours.

PR: Senior standing and a minimum grade of C- in CE 411 or CE 415 or CE 431 or CE 439 or CE 447 or CE 451 or CE 453 or CE 462 or CE 463 or CE 464 or CE 465. Capstone integration of the civil engineering curriculum by comprehensive design experience to professional standards. Projects are performed in student groups under faculty supervision.

CE 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

CE 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

CE 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CE 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

CE 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CE 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

CE 497. Research. 1-15 Hours.

Independent research projects.

CE 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.


Faculty

Chair

  • Radhey Sharma - Ph.D. (Oxford)
    Sustainable infrastructure, Geotechnical engineering & geoenvironmental , Energy engineering

Professors

  • Hung-Liang (Roger) Chen - Ph.D. (Northwestern University)
    Structural dynamics, Structural experimentation, Dynamic soil-structure interaction, Damage in reinforced concrete structures, Nondestructive evaluation, Concrete
  • Hota GangaRao - Ph.D., P.E. (North Carolina State University)
    Maurice A. and Jo Ann Wadsworth Distinguished Professor, Director, Constructed Facilities Center. Director, NSF Center for Integration of Composites into Infrastructure, Mathematical modeling of engineering systems, Bridge engineering, Composite material characterization and implementation
  • Udaya B. Halabe - Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
    Nondestructive evaluation and in-situ condition assessment of structures and materials, Elastic and electromagnetic (radar) wave propagation, Structural analysis and design, Structural dynamics and wind/earthquake resistant design
  • David R. Martinelli - Ph.D. (University of Maryland)
    Transportation engineering, Traffic operations, Systems analysis, Infrastructure management
  • Hema J. Siriwardane - Ph.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)
    Geomechanics/geotechnical engineering, Finite element method, Computer applications
  • John P. Zaniewski - Ph.D. (University of Texas)
    Asphalt Technology Professor, Pavement materials, Design, Construction, Maintenance, Infrastructure management

Associate Professors

  • Karl Barth - Ph.D. (Purdue University)
    Jack H. Samples Distinguished Professor of Structures, Steel structures, Bridge design and rehabilitation, Connections, Stability analysis, Experimental mechanics
  • Lian-Shin Lin - Ph.D. (Purdue University)
    Physicochemical and biological treatment, Innovative wastewater technologies, Emerging contaminants, sustainable development, Watershed pollution
  • John D. Quaranta - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    Geotechnical/geoenvironmental engineering, Soil testing and characterization, Soil and mine waste dewatering, Geosynthetics, Soil and groundwater remediation

Assistant Professors

  • Omar I. Abdul-Aziz - Ph.D. (University of Minnesota, Twin Cities)
    Ecological-Water Resources Engineering; Scaling of Hydro-Ecological and Biochemical Variables;Modeling of Stream Water Quality and Ecosystem Carbon; Fluid Mechanics; Hydrology.
  • Fei Dai - Ph.D. (Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
    Constructions Engineering, Construction Management, Construction Information Technologies
  • SeungHo Hong - Ph.D. (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    River Engineering, Fluid Mechanics, Sediment Transport, Experimental Techniques in Engineering
  • Leslie Clark Hopkinson - Ph.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)
    Surface hydrology, Environmental hydraulics, Ecological engineering, River mechanics
  • Antarpreet Jutla - Ph.D. (Tufts University)
    Water Resoucres, Hydrology & human health, Remote sensing, Issues of scales in hydroclimatic processes
  • P.V. Vijay - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    Concrete Structures; P Composite Structures for Bridges, Buildings, and Pavements; Aging of Structures and Rehabilitation, Recycled Polymers for Infrastructure, Analytical Modeling
  • Jennifer L. Weidhaas - Ph.D., P.E. (University of California- Davis)
    Biotechnology, Bioenergy production, and remediation of emerging contaminants in soils and ground water
  • Yoojung Yoon - Ph.D. (Purdue University)
    Infrastructure Asset Management, Risk Management in Construction, Project Management and Control, Construction Equipment Management

Research Assistant Professors

  • Rufieng Liang - Ph.D. (Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Chemistry)
    Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites, Engineering Plastics, Green Materials, Sustainable Infrastructure

Professors Emeritus

  • Ronald W. Eck - Ph.D. (Clemson University)
  • Donald Gray - Ph.D. (Purdue University)
  • W. Joseph Head - Ph.D. (Purdue Univeristy)
  • Charles R. Jenkins - Ph.D. (Oklahoma State University)
  • Larry D. Luttrell - Ph.D. (Cornell University)
  • William A. Sack - Ph.D. (Michigan State University)

Associate Professors Emeritus

  • Robert N. Eli - Ph.D. (University of Iowa)
  • Darrell R. Dean Jr. - Ph.D. (Purdue University)

Adjunct associate professor

  • Avinash Unnikrishnan - Ph.D. (University of Texas - Austin)
    Network Equilibrium Models, Freight and Logistics, Safety, Traffic Simulation, Operations and control

Lecturer

  • LiYaning (Maggie) Tang - Ph.D. (The Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
    Public-Private Partnership (PPP), Environmental impact assessment (EIA), Construction sustainability, Carbon emission footprint