Chemical Engineering

Degree Offered

  • Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering (B.S.Ch.E.)

Nature of Program

The chemical engineering curriculum is designed to give graduates a broad background in chemical engineering processes and to prepare them to become practicing engineers.  Graduates are prepared for positions in operations, development, design, construction, and management of chemical plants, environmental processes, life sciences, and materials processing.  These industries convert raw materials, such as ethylene and other organic feedstocks, via chemical and physical changes to produce economically desirable products such as plastics, detergents, paints, and adhesives.  Students with this background are also prepared for graduate school in engineering and science as well as for any professional school. The chemical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Program Educational Objectives

  • Graduates will be successful in their professional careers and/or post graduate training as demonstrated by their solution of traditional chemical engineering problems, their solution of problems in extended applications of chemical engineering (especially biologically), as well as non-related fields, and their development of new and valuable ideas.
  • Graduates will be able to work competitively in diverse professional environments, as demonstrated by successfully working on teams, working independently, providing leadership, mentoring junior co-workers, and communicating effectively.
  • Graduates will demonstrate professional character exhibited by their ethical behavior, their pursuit of professional registration, their pursuit of life-long learning opportunities, their commitment to responsible safety practices, and their articulation of the environmental impact of their work.

Practical work on process and product design and synthesis is incorporated into all chemical engineering classes.  One element is group design projects that require sophomores and juniors to use their knowledge as it is gained.  Another element is the individual design project that require seniors to synthesize their knowledge of chemical engineering, correct any deficiencies in their knowledge of chemical engineering, and which also provide faculty a method of assessing the success of the sophomore and junior years.  The third element is a group project in which seniors work under the direction of a student chief engineer on a year-long comprehensive design.  In conjunction with these projects, there are required written and oral presentations and required computer applications integrated throughout the curriculum.  Completion of these projects also trains students to work in groups of different sizes and gives them experience in self-directed learning.  Additionally, in the senior year, elements of professional practice, ethics, and safety are introduced in the classroom.

The chemical engineering curriculum also contains a significant laboratory component aimed at reinforcing the knowledge gained in the classroom.  In addition to basic chemistry and physics laboratories, the chemical engineering laboratories include a laboratory course that reinforce material taught in the junior year, followed by a two-semester laboratory sequence in the senior year in which the principles of experimental design, laboratory and safety procedures, data analysis, and report writing are stressed.

Click here to view the Suggested Plan of Study

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering

General Education FOUNDATIONS

Please use this link to view a list of courses that meet each GEF requirement.

NOTE: Some major requirements will fulfill specific GEF requirements. Please see the curriculum requirements listed below for details on which GEFs you will need to select.

General Education Foundations
F1 - Composition & Rhetoric3-6
Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric
and Composition, Rhetoric, and Research
Accelerated Academic Writing
F2A/F2B - Science & Technology4-6
F3 - Math & Quantitative Skills3-4
F4 - Society & Connections3
F5 - Human Inquiry & the Past3
F6 - The Arts & Creativity3
F7 - Global Studies & Diversity3
F8 - Focus (may be satisfied by completion of a minor, double major, or dual degree)9
Total Hours31-37

Please note that not all of the GEF courses are offered at all campuses. Students should consult with their advisor or academic department regarding the GEF course offerings available at their campus.

Curriculum Requirements 

To receive a degree of bachelor of science in chemical engineering, a student must meet the University’s undergraduate degree requirements, take all the courses indicated below, and attain a grade point average of 2.0 or better in all chemical engineering courses. If a chemical engineering course is repeated, only the last grade received is used to compute the major grade point average, and the course credit hours are counted only once. This requirement assures that the student has demonstrated overall competence in the major.

Freshman Engineering Requirements
ENGR 101Engineering Problem Solving 12
Engineering Problem Solving:3
Introduction to Chemical Engineering
Engineering Problem-Solving 2
Introduction to Nanotechnology Design
Introduction to Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Design
ENGR 199Orientation to Engineering1
Chemical Engineering Core Requirements (Minimum GPA of 2.0 required)
CHE 201Material and Energy Balances 13
CHE 202Material and Energy Balances 23
CHE 230Numerical Methods for Chemical Engineering3
CHE 310Process Fluid Mechanics3
CHE 311Process Heat Transfer3
CHE 312Separation Processes3
CHE 315Chemical Engineering Transport Analysis3
CHE 320Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics3
CHE 325Chemical Reaction Engineering3
CHE 326Reaction Phenomena3
CHE 351 Chemical Process Lab2
CHE 355 Process Simulation and Design2
CHE 435Chemical Process Control3
CHE 450Unit Operations Laboratory 12
CHE 451Unit Operations Laboratory 2 (Fulfills Writing and Communication Skills Requirement)2
CHE 455Chemical Process Design 14
CHE 456Chemical Process Design 23
CHE 475Chemical Process Safety3
Math & Science Requirements (36 Credits)
First Year Chemistry (GEF 2B):8
Fundamentals of Chemistry
and Fundamentals of Chemistry
Principles of Chemistry
and Principles of Chemistry
CHEM 233Organic Chemistry3
CHEM 235Organic Chemistry Laboratory1
Calculus I (GEF 3):4
Calculus 1a with Precalculus
and Calculus 1b with Precalculus
Calculus 1
MATH 156Calculus 2 (GEF 8)4
MATH 251Multivariable Calculus4
MATH 261Elementary Differential Equations4
PHYS 111General Physics (GEF 8)4
PHYS 112General Physics (GEF 8)4
Technical Electives
Engineering Science Electives6
Advanced Science Electives7
Advanced Chemistry Elective (3hrs)
Life Science Elective (4 hrs)
Other Technical Electives6
GEF Electives 1, 4, 5, 6, 718
Total Hours130

Technical Electives

Engineering Electives6
Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
Biomaterials
Cellular Machinery
Applied Bio-Molecular Modeling
Introduction to Tissue Engineering
Civil Engineering Materials
Hydrotechnical Engineering
Introduction to Transportation Engineering
Introduction to Environmental Engineering
Introductory Soil Mechanics
Materials Science
Coal Conversion Engineering
Polymer Science and Engineering
Polymer Processing
Polymer Composites Processing
Electronic Materials Processing
Biochemical Engineering
Biochemical Separations
Chemical Process Safety
Pollution Prevention
Independent Study
Senior Thesis
Honors
Introduction to Digital Logic Design
Introduction to Electrical Engineering
Introduction to Electrical Engineering Laboratory
Electrical Circuits Laboratory
Engineering Statistics
Re-Engineering Management Systems
System Safety Engineering
Mechatronics
Intro to Aerospace Engineering
Statics
Dynamics
Mechanics of Materials
Dynamics and Strength Laboratory
Internal Combustion Engines
Bioengineering
Introduction to Petroleum Engineering
Advanced Chemistry Electives3
Introductory Biochemistry
Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory
Nutritional Biochemistry
Introduction to Biochemistry
Biomaterials
Cellular Machinery
Applied Bio-Molecular Modeling
Introduction to Tissue Engineering
Materials Science
Electronic Materials Processing
Introductory Analytical Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Instrumental Analysis
Environmental Chemistry
Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
Experimental Physical Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Advanced Science Electives3
General Microbiology
Environmental Microbiology
Food Microbiology
Introductory Biochemistry
Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory
Nutritional Biochemistry
Introduction to Biochemistry
Introductory Physiology
The Living Cell
Ecology and Evolution
Human Physiology
Human Physiology: Quantitative Laboratory
Materials Science
Electronic Materials Processing
Introductory Analytical Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Instrumental Analysis
Environmental Chemistry
Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
Experimental Physical Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Food Science and Technology
Principles of Genetics
Introduction to Mathematical Physics
Introductory Electronics
Introductory Modern Physics
Elementary Physiology
Life Sciences Electives4
General Microbiology
Environmental Microbiology
General Biology
and General Biology
and General Biology Laboratory
and General Biology Laboratory
Principles of Biology
Introductory Physiology
Human Physiology
Human Physiology: Quantitative Laboratory
Principles of Genetics
Elementary Physiology
Other Technical Electives3
General Microbiology
Environmental Microbiology
Introductory Biochemistry
Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory
Nutritional Biochemistry
Introduction to Biochemistry
Environmental Biology
Environmental Biology Laboratory
Principles of Biology
Introductory Physiology
The Living Cell
Ecology and Evolution
Human Physiology
Human Physiology: Quantitative Laboratory
Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
Biomaterials
Cellular Machinery
Applied Bio-Molecular Modeling
Introduction to Tissue Engineering
Civil Engineering Materials
Hydrotechnical Engineering
Introduction to Transportation Engineering
Introduction to Environmental Engineering
Introductory Soil Mechanics
Materials Science
Coal Conversion Engineering
Polymer Science and Engineering
Polymer Processing
Polymer Composites Processing
Electronic Materials Processing
Biochemical Engineering
Biochemical Separations
Chemical Process Safety
Pollution Prevention
Independent Study
Senior Thesis
Honors
Introductory Analytical Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Instrumental Analysis
Environmental Chemistry
Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
Experimental Physical Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Introduction to Digital Logic Design
Discrete Mathematics
Introduction to Electrical Engineering
Introduction to Electrical Engineering Laboratory
Electrical Circuits Laboratory
Elements of Environmental Protection
Food Science and Technology
Principles of Genetics
Planet Earth
Planet Earth Laboratory
Environmental Geoscience
Environmental Geoscience Laboratory
Physical Oceanography
Engineering Statistics
Re-Engineering Management Systems
System Safety Engineering
Mechatronics
Intro to Aerospace Engineering
Statics
Dynamics
Mechanics of Materials
Dynamics and Strength Laboratory
Internal Combustion Engines
Bioengineering
Introduction to the Concepts of Mathematics
Introduction to Mathematical Physics
Introductory Electronics
Introductory Modern Physics
Elementary Physiology
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Industrial Statistics
Total Hours19

Suggested Plan of Study

It is important for students to take courses in the order specified as much as possible; all prerequisites and concurrent requirements must be observed.  A typical B.S.Ch.E degree program that completes degree requirements in four years is as follows.

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
MATH 155 (GEF 3)4MATH 156 (GEF 8)4
ENGR 1012CHE 1023
ENGR 1991PHYS 111 (GEF 8)4
CHEM 115 (GEF 2)4CHEM 1164
ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3GEF 53
GEF 43 
 17 18
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHE 2013CHE 2023
CHEM 2333CHE 2303
CHEM 2351MATH 2614
MATH 2514GEF 63
PHYS 112 (GEF 8)4GEF 73
ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3 
 18 16
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHE 3103CHE 3123
CHE 3113CHE 3153
CHE 3203CHE 3253
Life Science Technical Elective4CHE 3263
CHE 351 2CHE 3552
 Engineering Science Elective3
 15 17
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHE 4353CHE 4512
CHE 4502CHE 4563
CHE 4554CHE 4753
Advanced Science Elective3Engineering Science Elective3
Technical Elective3Technical Elective3
 15 14
Total credit hours: 130

Major Learning Goals

chemical engineering

Upon graduation, all Bachelors of Science students in Chemical Engineering will:

  • Understand and be able to analyze entire chemical processes, including those with life science applications.
  • Be proficient in the oral and written communication of their work and ideas.
  • Be proficient in the use of computers, recent computer software, and computer-based information systems.
  • Have the ability to learn independently but will also be able to participate effectively in groups.
  • Be able to design effective laboratory experiments, to perform laboratory experiments, to gather data, to analyze data, and to test theories.
  • Be prepared for a lifetime of continuing education.
  • Understand the safety and environmental consequences of their work as chemical engineers and will be able to design safe processes.
  • Understand their professional and ethical responsibilities.
  • Have the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context.

These outcomes are achieved via rigorous individual courses in all basic areas of chemical engineering, the natural and life sciences, mathematics, humanities, and social sciences.  A flexible electives program allows specialization in areas such as environment and safety, polymers and materials, biological processes, and energy processes.

The chemical engineering department uses an outcomes-assessment plan for continuous program improvement.  The design projects, in conjunction with yearly interviews and questionnaires, provide the measures of learning outcomes.  These outcomes-assessment results provide feedback to the faculty to improve teaching and learning processes.

Academic Policies

  1. Students completing the three 200-level courses (CHE 201, CHE 202, and CHE 230) must attain a 2.0 grade-point average in order to enroll in the 300-level core CHE courses.  Students with a grade-point average greater than or equal to 1.67 can submit a formal appeal of this restriction to the department chair for evaluation by the chair, CHE curriculum committee, and CHE academic standards committee.  No appeals will be considered for students below a 1.67 grade-point average in the three 200-level courses.
  2. Students completing the 300-level core CHE courses must attain a 2.0 grade-point average in core CHE courses (CHE 201, CHE 202, CHE 230, CHE 310, CHE 311, CHE 312, CHE 320, CHE 325, CHE 326, CHE 351, CHE 355) in order to enroll in 400-level core CHE course.  No appeals will be considered for students moving from the junior to senior level courses.
  3. In order to receive a degree, students must attain a 2.0 grade-point average in all chemical engineering courses, including chemical engineering elective and special topics courses.  In addition, students may only have a grade of D in three (3) chemical engineering courses.  If a chemical engineering course is repeated, the last grade received will be used to determine grade-point average and the number of D grades on the transcript.
  4. A grade of F in any prerequisite course for a core CHE course disqualifies the student from taking that core course until the F has been removed.
  5. Requests to transfer credit for core chemical engineering courses must be submitted to the CBE Undergraduate Curriculum Committee or faculty advisors for review.  Consideration will only be made when the courses are offered at ABET accredited institutions and the course syllabus has been submitted.  Please see college guidelines for additional restrictions to transfer credit.

CHE 102. Introduction to Chemical Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: ENGR 101 and PR or CONC: (CHEM 116 or CHEM 118.) Overview of traditional and emerging areas of chemical engineering, projects involving computational and programming tools, design projects, written and oral presentation of results, discussions of professional and ethical behavior relating to the engineering professions.

CHE 201. Material and Energy Balances 1. 3 Hours.

PR: MATH 155 and CHEM 116 and PR or CONC: ENGR 102 or CHE 102. Introduction to chemical engineering fundamentals and calculation procedures, industrial stoichiometry, real gases and vapor-liquid equilibrium,heat capacities and enthalpies, and unsteady material balances and energy balances. (2 hr. lec., 2 hr. calc. lab.).

CHE 202. Material and Energy Balances 2. 3 Hours.

PR: (CHE 201 or CHE 211) and PR or CONC: CHE 230. Continuation of CHE 201. (2 hr. lec., 2 hr. calc. lab.).

CHE 230. Numerical Methods for Chemical Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: (ENGR 102 or CHE 102) and MATH 156 and PR or CONC: (CHE 202 or CHE 212) and MATH 251. Numerical solution of algebraic and differential equations with emphasis on process material and energy balances. Statistical methods optimization, and numerical analysis. (2 hr. lec., 2 hr. calc. lab.).

CHE 293. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CHE 310. Process Fluid Mechanics. 3 Hours.

PR: MATH 251 and (CHE 202 or CHE 212). Fluid statics, laminar and turbulent flow, mechanical energy balance, Bernoulli equation, force balance, friction, flow in pipes, pumps, metering and transportation of fluids, flow through packed beds and fluidized beds. Laboratory demonstrations and experiments. (2 hr. lec., 2 hr. calc. lab.).

CHE 311. Process Heat Transfer. 3 Hours.

PR: MATH 251 and (CHE 202 or CHE 212). Conductive heat transfer, convective heat transfer, design and selection of heat exchange equipment, evaporation, and radiation. Applications, laboratory demonstrations, and experiments. (2 hr. lec., 2 hr. calc. lab.).

CHE 312. Separation Processes. 3 Hours.

PR: CHE 310 and CHE 311 and CHE 320. Equilibrium stage and multiple stage operations, differential countercurrent contracting, membrane separations, fluid-particle separations.

CHE 315. Chemical Engineering Transport Analysis. 3 Hours.

PR: CHE 310 and CHE 311 and CHE 320 and MATH 261. Development of fundamental relationships for momentum, heat and mass transfer for flow systems to include chemical reactions, interphase transport, and transient phenomena. Development and use of microscopic and macroscopic balance equations.

CHE 320. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 Hours.

PR: (CHE 202 or CHE 212) and MATH 251. First and second laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic functions for real materials. Physical equilibrium concepts and applications. (2 hr. lec., 2 hr. calc. lab.).

CHE 325. Chemical Reaction Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: CHE 312 or CHE 317. Application of material balances, energy balances, chemical equilibrium relations, and chemical kinetic expressions to the design of chemical reactors. (3 hr. lec.).

CHE 326. Reaction Phenomena. 3 Hours.

PR: CHE 320 and PR or CONC: CHE 325. Theory and application of reaction kinetics, analysis of rate data, reaction equilibrium, and catalysis. The application of these phenomena to industrial relevant systems will be emphasized.

CHE 351. Chemical Process Laboratory. 2 Hours.

PR or CONC: CHE 310 and CHE 311. Reinforcement of practical concepts acquired during the junior year chemical engineering courses on fluids and heat transfer through experimental design and practice.

CHE 355. Process Simulation and Design. 2 Hours.

PR or CONC: CHE 312 and CHE 325. The application and use of chemical process simulation software to the design of a chemical process.

CHE 366. Materials Science. 3 Hours.

PR: CHEM 116 and junior standing in engineering and mineral resources or chemistry. Chemical bonding and structures of metals, ceramics, and organic materials; the dependence of properties upon these structures and bonding conditions; thermal and mechanical stresses; corrosion; synthesis and preparation of materials.

CHE 414. Coal Conversion Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: CHEM 233 and PR or CONC: (CHE 312 or CHE 317) and CHE 325. Coal conversion processes from the unit-operations approach; thermodynamics, kinetics, and evaluation of system requirements and performance. (3 hr. lec.).

CHE 435. Chemical Process Control. 3 Hours.

PR: (CHE 230 or CHE 330) and (CHE 325 or CHE 327). Transient behavior of chemical process flow systems, linearization and stability. Process control system design including frequency response analysis. Instrumentation and hardware.

CHE 450. Unit Operations Laboratory 1. 2 Hours.

PR: (CHE 312 or CHE 317) and (CHE 350 or CHE 351). Operation of chemical process engineering equipment; collection, analysis, and evaluation of laboratory report preparation. (4 hr. lab.).

CHE 451. Unit Operations Laboratory 2. 2 Hours.

PR: CHE 450. Continuation of CHE 450. (4 hr. lab.).

CHE 455. Chemical Process Design 1. 4 Hours.

PR: (CHE 312 or CHE 317) and CHE 325. Analysis, synthesis, and design of chemical process systems. Engineering economics, safety, professional aspects of the practice of chemical engineering. Includes a group chemical plant design project, as well as individual design projects. (3 hr. lec., 4 hr. des. lab.).

CHE 456. Chemical Process Design 2. 3 Hours.

PR: CHE 455. Continuation of CHE 455.

CHE 461. Polymer Science and Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: CHEM 233. Polymer classification, polymer synthesis, molecular weights and experimental techniques, thermodynamics, rubber elasticity, mechanical behavior, crystallization, diffusion, rheology, extrusion and injection molding. (3 hr. lec.).

CHE 462. Polymer Processing. 3 Hours.

PR: Junior standing in engineering and mineral resources. Flow behavior in idealized situations; extrusion; calendering; coating; injection molding; fiber spinning; film blowing; mixing; heat and mass transfer; flow instabilities. (3 hr. lec.).

CHE 463. Polymer Composites Processing. 3 Hours.

PR: Junior standing in engineering and mineral resources. Advantages and applications of polymer composites; chemistry and kinetics of thermosetting polymers; hand layup and spray up; compression molding; resin transfer molding; reaction injection molding; filament winding; pultrusion. (3 hr. lec.).

CHE 466. Electronic Materials Processing. 3 Hours.

PR: Junior standing in engineering and mineral resources. The design and application of thermal, plasma, and ion assisted processing methodologies; solid state, gas phase, surface, and plasma chemistry underpinnings; thin film nucleation and growth; the effect of processing methods and conditions on mechanical, electrical, and optical properties. (3 hr. lec.).

CHE 471. Biochemical Engineering. 3 Hours.

PR: CHE 325. Kinetics of enzymatic and microbial reactions, interactions between biochemical reactions and transport phenomena, analysis and design of bioreactors, enzyme technology, cell cultures, bioprocess engineering. (3 hr. lec.).

CHE 472. Biochemical Separations. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: CHE 312 or CHE 317. Modeling and design of separation processes applicable to recovery of biological products. Topics include filtration, centrifugation, extraction, adsorption, chromatography, electrophoresis, membranes, crystallization, and examples from industry. (3 hr. lec.).

CHE 475. Chemical Process Safety. 3 Hours.

PR: CHE 202 or CHE 212. Introduction to safety, health and loss prevention in the chemical process industry; regulations, toxicology, hazard identification, system safety analysis and safety design techniques. (3 hr. lec.).

CHE 476. Pollution Prevention. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: (CHE 312 or CHE 317) and CHE 325 and CHE 326. Environmental risk and regulations; fate and persistence of chemicals; green chemistry; evaluation and improvement of pollution performance during chemical process design; life cycle analysis; industrial ecology.

CHE 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

CHE 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

CHE 493. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CHE 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CHE 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

CHE 497. Research. 1-15 Hours.

CHE 497. Research. I,II,S. 1-15 hr. PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. Grading may be S/U.