Department of Management

Degree Offered

  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

Management Program Objectives

The management program provides the skills and knowledge needed for students who aspire to leadership roles in business.  The program prepares them for various managerial positions.  Students choose from one of four areas of emphasis (AoE) in management:

  • Entrepreneurship
  • Human Resource Management
  • International Business
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Students pursuing the Entrepreneurship area of emphasis pursue positions such as small business manager, entrepreneur, franchise owner or opportunities with large companies with an innovation focus.  So, students are prepared for management roles with small business or large companies.
  • Students pursuing the Human Resource Management area of emphasis develop capabilities for careers in compensation, recruiting, or training that could lead to managerial positions in human resources.
  • Students pursuing the International Business area of emphasis are encouraged to study a foreign language and to participate in a study abroad program.  They develop expertise in international business strategy, and they acquire an appreciation of foreign culture and business practices.  Students electing this area of emphasis would be prepared to work in overseas locations and develop expertise in managing operations outside the United States.

Management majors must declare one of the aforementioned areas of emphasis and complete all requirements for the major and the AoE in order to be eligible for graduation.  Students who prefer not to pursue an area of emphasis may declare the General Business major, which offers students the opportunity to complete electives in more than one of the areas of emphasis. 

Admission

Students who are direct admitted to the major as first-time freshmen or first time transfers must possess an overall GPA of at least 2.5 and have completed the course prerequisites listed in table below with minimum grade of C-, unless otherwise noted, to be eligible to enroll in upper-division course work. 

Students who are not direct admitted to the major (i.e. Business) must formally apply for admission to the major at the beginning of the semester in which they satisfy the course prerequisites listed below.  Applicants also must possess an overall GPA of at least 2.5 at the time of application to be considered for admission to the major.

ACCT 201
ACCT 202
Principles of Accounting
and Principles of Accounting
6
CS 101Intro to Computer Applications 4
ECON 201
ECON 202
Principles of Microeconomics
and Principles of Macroeconomics
6
ECON 225Elementary Business and Economics Statistics 3
or STAT 211 Elementary Statistical Inference
ENGL 101
ENGL 102
Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric
and Composition, Rhetoric, and Research
6
or ENGL 103 Accelerated Academic Writing
Choose one of the Following:3-4
College Algebra 5-Day
College Algebra 4-Day
Pre-Calculus Mathematics
Calculus 1a with Precalculus
Choose one of the Following:3-4
Applied Calculus *
Calculus 1b with Precalculus *
Calculus 1 *
Calculus 2 *
Total Hours31-33

Students who are direct admitted to the major and meet the requirements listed above are guaranteed permission to enroll in upper-division course work.  Students who are not direct admitted to the major will be admitted in order of descending GPA, calculated using all (transferable) baccalaureate coursework attempted at regionally accredited institutions.  The College will accommodate as many Management majors as resources are available. Students who are denied admission to the Management major because of GPA may apply for admission in a future application period or accept admission to an alternative major in the College.

*

A minimum grade of C- in MATH 150 is required for admission to the program. A grade of D- in MATH 154 or a higher level of college calculus also satisfies the calculus requirement for admission to the program.

General Education FOUNDATIONS

Please use this link to view a list of courses that meet each GEF requirement.

NOTE: Some major requirements will fulfill specific GEF requirements. Please see the curriculum requirements listed below for details on which GEFs you will need to select.

General Education Foundations
F1 - Composition & Rhetoric3-6
Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric
and Composition, Rhetoric, and Research
Accelerated Academic Writing
F2A/F2B - Science & Technology4-6
F3 - Math & Quantitative Skills3-4
F4 - Society & Connections3
F5 - Human Inquiry & the Past3
F6 - The Arts & Creativity3
F7 - Global Studies & Diversity3
F8 - Focus (may be satisfied by completion of a minor, double major, or dual degree)9
Total Hours31-37

Management Program Requirements

To qualify for the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration students must meet the following criteria:

  • Complete a minimum of 120 credit hours.
  • Possess an overall GPA of 2.0 or higher.
  • Possess a minimum GPA of 2.0 for all Major Courses (i.e., ACCT, ENTR, GSCM, HRMG, INBS, MANG, and all AOE courses)  calculated using all attempted GPA hours unless excluded by the D/F repeat policy.
  • The College of Business and Economics accepts all baccalaureate transferable course work completed at public and private colleges in West Virginia and other regionally accredited institutions.  Since the College is AACSB accredited, upper-division courses (courses equivalent to 300/400 level at WVU) must be evaluated by the Dean or designee before they may count toward business core, major core and major restricted electives in the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration or Bachelor of Science in Economics program. 

Curriculum Requirements 

Overall GPA of 2.0 or higher is required
Possess a minimum GPA of 2.0 for all Major Courses (i.e. ACCT, ENTR, GSCM, HRMG, INBS, MANG, and all AOE courses), calculated using all attempted GPA hours unless excluded by the D/F repeat policy.
ACCT 201Principles of Accounting (Minimum grade of C-)3
ACCT 202Principles of Accounting (Minimum grade of C-)3
CS 101Intro to Computer Applications (Minimum grade of C-; may fulfill GEF 2A)4
ECON 201Principles of Microeconomics (Minimum grade of C-; may fulfill GEF 4 or 8)3
ECON 202Principles of Macroeconomics (Minimum grade of C-; may fulfill GEF 4 or 8)3
Select one of the following (Minimum Grade of C-; may fulfill GEF 3):3
Elementary Business and Economics Statistics
Elementary Statistical Inference
Select one of the following (Minimum grade of C-; may fulfill GEF 1):6
Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric
and Composition, Rhetoric, and Research
Accelerated Academic Writing
GEF 2A, Science and Technology3
GEF 5, Human Inquiry & the Past3
GEF 6, The Arts & Creativity3
GEF 7, Global Studies & Diversity3
Select one of the following; minimum grade of C- in MATH 150 or D- in MATH 154 or higher3
College Algebra 5-Day
and Applied Calculus
College Algebra 4-Day
and Applied Calculus
Pre-Calculus Mathematics
and Calculus 1
Applied Calculus
Calculus 1a with Precalculus
and Calculus 1b with Precalculus
Calculus 1
PSYC 101Introduction to Psychology (May fulfill GEF 4 or 8)3
SOCA 101Introduction to Sociology (May fulfill GEF 4 or 8)3
BCOR 199Introduction to Business (Fulfills First Year Seminar requirement)3
BCOR 299Business Communication (Fulfills Writing and Communication Skills Requirement)3
BCOR 320Legal Environment of Business3
BCOR 330Information Systems and Technology3
BCOR 340Business Finance3
BCOR 350Principles of Marketing3
BCOR 360Operations Management3
BCOR 370Managing Individuals and Teams3
BCOR 380Business Ethics3
BCOR 460Contemporary Business Strategy3
ACCT 331Managerial Accounting3
MANG 330Human Resource Management Fundamentals3
MANG 360International Business3
MANG 422The Individual and the Organization3
MANG 434Business Research Methods3
Required Area of Emphasis12
Unrestricted Electives17
Total Hours120

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
BCOR 1993ACCT 2013
CS 101 (GEF 2A)4ECON 201 (GEF 4)3
Select one of the following:3ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3
 Select one of the following:3
  
  
  
SOCA 101 (GEF 8)3 
GEF (Choose from F2A, 5, 6 or 7)3GEF (Choose from F2A, 5, 6 or 7)3
 16 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ACCT 2023BCOR 2993
ECON 202 (GEF 8)3BCOR 3303
ECON 225 (GEF 3)3BCOR 3403
ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3BCOR 3503
PSYC 101 (GEF 8)3BCOR 3703
 15 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
Area of Emphasis Elective3Area of Emphasis Elective3
BCOR 3203BCOR 3603
MANG 3303MANG 3603
GEF (Choose from F2A, 5, 6 or 7)3MANG 4223
Unrestricted Electives3GEF (Choose from F2A, 5, 6 or 7)3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
Area of Emphasis Elective3Area of Emphasis Elective3
ACCT 3313Area of Emphasis Elective or Unrestricted Electives3
BCOR 3803BCOR 4603
Unrestricted Electives5MANG 4343
 Unrestricted Electives3
 14 15
Total credit hours: 120

Area of Emphasis

A student must declare an Area of Emphasis (AoE) upon matriculation to the management program.  The required courses for each area of emphasis are listed in the charts below.

Supply Chain Management Area of EMPHASIS

GSCM 350Sourcing and Supply Management3
GSCM 355Logistics and Distribution Management3
GSCM 450Supply Chain Quality Management3
GSCM 455Project Management3
MIST 320Managing Information Technology3
Total Hours15

Human Resource Management Area of Emphasis

HRMG 440Training and Development3
HRMG 450Staffing and Selection3
HRMG 460Compensation and Benefits3
HRMG 470Conflict Management3
or HRMG 480 Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations
Total Hours12

International Business Area of Emphasis

INBS 310Global Business Communication3
INBS 480Global Strategic Issues3
Choose two of the following:6
International Economics
International Finance
Export Management
Global Marketing
Total Hours12

Entrepreneurship Area of Emphasis

ENTR 400Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship3
ENTR 420Entrepreneurial Finance3
ENTR 430Business Analysis and Planning3
ENTR 440Entrepreneurship Practicum3
Total Hours12
 
 
 

Major Learning Goals

management

The objective of providing a foundational education in management at the undergraduate level cannot be realized without appropriate curricula content, effective teaching, and ultimately, learning. Within the undergraduate management major, we subscribe to the following learning goals for each of our undergraduate students:

  • Graduates will be able to deal with the dynamics of individuals and teams within organizations and to motivate, lead, and inspire employees toward achieving organizational goals.
  • Graduates will have an appreciation of the ethical, legal, and regulatory issues impacting the decision-making process.
  • Graduates will recognize the opportunities and challenges associated with the global marketplace.
  • Graduates will acquire knowledge of basic functional areas of human resource management.

Entrepreneurship Courses

ENTR 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ENTR 300. Creativity and Idea Generation. 3 Hours.

This course is about enhancing your personal creativity: seeing what others do not see, thinking what others do not think; coming up with new ideas.

ENTR 340. Survey of Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

PR: BUSA 202 or ACCT 201. This course offers a study of the concepts necessary to become a successful small business entrepreneur. The course work includes practical application of marketing and management skills.

ENTR 380. Survey of Business Planning. 3 Hours.

PR: ENTR 340. This course will provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the issues involved in the planning and creation of a new venture. The student will be exposed to the various roles of the entrepreneur.

ENTR 400. Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: BCOR 350 and BCOR 370. Fundamental principles and practices related to entrepreneurship. Focuses on areas such as leadership, motivation, human resource management as they apply to entrepreneurship.

ENTR 405. Entrepreneurial Creativity & Innovation. 3 Hours.

This course offers an in-depth study of theories and models of creativity to solve problems and identify opportunities in entrepreneurial business contexts. Students will synthesize their course experiences and develop a set of creative business ideas, which will be incorporated into feasibility assessments, financial analyses, and business plans in subsequent entrepreneurship major courses.

ENTR 410. Business Innovation. 3 Hours.

PR: ENTR 335. This course studies the innovation process from idea concept through technology transfer and into commercialization. In addition the course will examine the impact of innovation on economics.

ENTR 415. Entrepreneurship in Action. 3 Hours.

PR: ENTR 335. This course focuses strategy formation/implementation for an entrepreneurial business. Students will participate in a simulated "real world experience" in managing an entrepreneurial business enterprise.

ENTR 416. Social Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

PR: ENTR 400. This course will expose students to the topics and concepts in the emerging field of social entrepreneurship. The primary topic - how social entrepreneurs use business models to create sustainable enterprises.

ENTR 420. Entrepreneurial Finance. 3 Hours.

PR: BCOR 340 and (ENTR 400 or SBEN 310 and (ACCT 331 or FIN 320 or ACCT 431). Fundamental principles and practices in finance related to entrepreneurship. Focuses on areas such as accounting, budgeting and financial management as they apply to entrepreneurship.

ENTR 425. Risk Assessment and Contracts. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: ENTR 420. This course teaches students to assess risks in entrepreneurial enterprises that lead to business failures. Students will learn to develop business models, implement operational strategies, and structure legal agreements that mitigate exposure to risk in new ventures and emerging growth entities.

ENTR 430. Business Analysis and Planning. 3 Hours.

PR: ENTR 420 or SBEN 410. This course addresses the unique entrepreneurial experience of conceiving, evaluating and developing a full business plan for a new small business start up through the appropriate concepts and methodologies.

ENTR 436. Family Business. 3 Hours.

PR: ENTR 400. This class focuses on the different aspects of family businesses that facilitate competitive advantage while maintaining ethical and socially responsible principles. The objectives of this course are to create an awareness of family business issues, understand the role of familial relationships in a business context, and develop critical thinking skills in the context of family business challenges.

ENTR 440. Entrepreneurship Practicum. 3 Hours.

PR: ENTR 430 or. SBEN 438. This course provides practical experience in the development of formal policies and procedures and solutions to address identified business issues in a small business or entrepreneurial environment.

ENTR 460. Entrepreneurial Strategy: Managing New Entry, Innovation & Growth. 3 Hours.

PR: ENTR 440. This course will incorporate concepts from strategy and organizational design to address how entrepreneurs can strategically manage new entry, innovation, and growth.

ENTR 489. Student Business Plan Competition. 3 Hours.

This course provides an in-depth instruction on writing a comprehensive business plan and presenting the plan to a group of potential investors. Only current finalists competing in the student business plan competition are eligible to enroll.

ENTR 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

ENTR 492. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

ENTR 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ENTR 495. . 1-6 Hours.

Human Resource Management Courses

HRMG 440. Training and Development. 3 Hours.

PR: MANG 330 with a minimum grade of C-. This course provides a theoretical and practical understanding of the field of training and development and offers some practical approaches to conducting training programs.

HRMG 450. Staffing and Selection. 3 Hours.

PR: MANG 330 with a minimum grade of C-. This course focuses on the management of employee staffing and selection and includes such topics as government regulations affecting selection processes, reliability and validity of selection measures, and the measurement of actual job performance.

HRMG 460. Compensation and Benefits. 3 Hours.

PR: MANG 330 with a minimum grade of C-. Designing and implementing total compensation systems in both private and public sectors. The emerging elements of total compensation systems are included, providing insights into problems and opportunities for personnel.

HRMG 470. Conflict Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the management of conflict in an organizational setting. The topics covered include foundations of individual behavior, styles for managing conflict, negotiations, mediation, and arbitration.

HRMG 480. Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations. 3 Hours.

PR: MANG 330 with a minimum grade of C-. Examination of the theory and practice of collective bargaining. Topics include economics and historical environment, labor law, unionization, contract negotiation, contract content patterns, conflict resolution, grievance handling, and an introduction to arbitration.

HRMG 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated for a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged Experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise fro professional competence development.

HRMG 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty-supervised study of topics not available through regular course Offerings.

International Business Courses

INBS 310. Global Business Communication. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: BCOR 370. This course focuses on developing skills to communicate effectively in the cross-cultural context of the current international business environment. The focus is on interpersonal, team-and organizational- level communication in diverse cultural situations.

INBS 480. Global Strategic Issues. 3 Hours.

PR: MANG 360. An integrated, multifunctional approach that focuses on how globalization affects strategy, organization and control of a firm. Students are introduced to global strategic management and organization issues in the context of current theory, research and practice.

INBS 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated for a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned supervised , and evaluated for credity by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

INBS 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

Management Courses

MANG 330. Human Resource Management Fundamentals. 3 Hours.

PR: BCOR 370. Fundamental principles and practices related to the procurement, development, maintenance, and utilization of human resources. Focus on areas such as human resource planning, selection training, performance appraisals, compensation, safety and health and labor relations.

MANG 360. International Business. 3 Hours.

PR: BCOR 370. The course explores the cultural, economic, and political environments of business. Other topic include globalization, import and export, foreign direct investment, foreign currency exchange, regional economic cooperation, and the multinational enterprise.

MANG 422. The Individual and the Organization. 3 Hours.

PR: BCOR 370. Examination of how the individual, the group, and the organization interact to influence the behavior of the business organization and that of its human resources.

MANG 426. Introduction to Decision Analysis. 3 Hours.

PR: BCOR 330. Developing and solving decision analysis models utilizing spreadsheets.

MANG 434. Business Research Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: MANG 330 with a minimum grade of C-. Research methods and measurement in human resources management; philosophy of science, ethics in research, research design, and analytical methods.

MANG 480. Corporate Social Responsibility. 3 Hours.

PR: BCOR 370. Provides an overview of personal support and involvement in not-for-profit organizations in meeting community needs.

MANG 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

MANG 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours). Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

MANG 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

MANG 494A-B. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

MANG 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

MANG 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

MANG 497. Research. 1-6 Hours.

Independent research projects.

MANG 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

Small Business Entreprnrshp Courses

SBEN 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

SBEN 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty-supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.


Faculty

Chair

  • Abhishek Srivastava - Ph.D. (University of Marlyand, College Park)

Professors

  • Jack A. Fuller - Ph.D. (University of Arkansas)
    Heuristic decision making, Production planning and control, Systems analysis and design.
  • Usha Haley - Ph.D. (Stern School of Business)
    Multinational Corporations and Strategic Management, Business-government relations, sanctions and subsidies.

Associate Professors

  • Gerald Blakely - Ph.D. (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
    Human resources management, Organizational behavior.
  • David Dawley - Ph.D. (Florida State University)
    Strategic management, Strategic turnaround decisions and organization commitment, Ph.D. seminar-strategy.
  • Mark Gavin - Ph.D. (Purdue University)
    Organizational behavior, Human resource management, Ph.D. seminars-research methods and structural equation modeling.
  • Jodi Goodman - Ph.D. (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    Organization behavior, Human resource management, Learning & training methodologies, Statistics, Ph.D. seminar-org behavior.
  • Jeffrey Houghton - Ph.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)
    International human resources management, Self leadership, Team processes, Ph.D. seminar-leadership.
  • Nancy McIntyre - Ph.D. (University of Rhode Island)
    Management, Organizational behavior.
  • Curt Moore - PhD; Texas Tech University
    PhD Seminar - OT; Entrepreneurship
  • Edward Tomlinson - Ph.D. (The Ohio State University)
    Organization behavior, Trust, Negotiation and conflict resolution, Compensation and benefits, Ph.D. seminar-group processes.

Assistant Professors

  • Ajay Aluri - Ph.D. (Oklahoma State University)
    Hospitality management, Social media.
  • Olga Bruyaka - (Jean Moulin Unversity Leon 3, Em Lyon)
    Strategic management, Technology management and innovation, Strategic alliances, Firm internationalization, Social issues in management
  • Jennifer Sexton - Ph.D. (Florida State University)
    Strategy, Entrepreneurship, Global business communication.
  • Miles A. Zachary - Ph.D (Texas Tech University)
    Strategic management, Entrepreneurship

Teaching Professor

  • David Cale - Ph.D. (Duquesne University-Pittsburgh)
    Ethics, Entrepreneurhip.
  • Steve Cutright - M.B.A. (West Virginia University)
    Entrepreneuship
  • Frank DeMarco - M.B.A. (West Virginia University)
    Hospitality, Hotel and restaurant management.
  • Suzanne Gosden-Kitchen - Ed.D. (West Virginia University)
    Human resource management, Diversity, EEO, Disability, Business writing, Higher education leadership.

Executive in Residence

  • William Hutchison - MSIR (West Virginia University)
    Collective bargaining, Compensation & benefits.

Professors Emeriti

  • Neil Bucklew
  • Randyl D. Elkin
  • John Harpell, Jr.
  • Richard W. Humphreys
  • Thomas S. Isaack
  • Ali H. Mansour
  • Dietrich Schaupp

Adjunct professors

  • David Hendrickson - J.D.
  • Tina Parton - MSIR
  • Jon Reed - J.D.
  • Nathan Wright - MSIR