World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics

http://worldlang.wvu.edu/

Degree Offered

Bachelor of Arts, with six possible areas of emphasis

  • Chinese Studies
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Russian Studies
  • Spanish

Nature of Program

Coursework is offered in foreign literature and cultures, linguistics, and languages, including Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin (Classics), Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.  Literature courses taught in English are designated as Foreign Literature in Translation (FLIT) courses. Culture and film courses taught in English are designated as Foreign Cultures (FCLT) courses.  Other areas of instruction are Language Teaching Methods (LANG), dealing with second language acquisition and teaching methodology, Linguistics (LING), and English as a Second Language (ESL). 

The primary goal of the program in foreign languages is to provide students with a solid liberal arts education that is the foundation for personal and professional success and growth over a lifetime.  The curriculum is designed to provide students with well-developed cognitive and communication skills and with a broad knowledge base that will enable them to pursue additional studies at the graduate level or to enter the job market in positions that will demand the ability to communicate in more than one language and in a variety of cultural contexts.

Career Goals for Graduates

In today’s rapidly increasing global economy, students may use foreign language study to add a valuable international dimension to myriad career opportunities such as teaching, business, economics, government work and Foreign Service, journalism, law, medicine, computer, and other scientific research.

Study Abroad

The Department of World Languages regularly offers language courses abroad.  Currently, summer courses are offered in Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, Spain, and Taiwan.  Students participating in a summer program normally register for six credit hours.  Contingent upon funding and faculty availability, the department offers similar programs every year.  Course work completed abroad at the appropriate level can be used to fulfill various requirements for the major, with permission from a World Language adviser.

Credit for Prior Knowledge

Many of our students have studied another language in high school, or are native speakers of the language they wish to study.  The Department of World Languages offers several ways in which knowledge can be turned into College credit.

Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate

Students who have passed AP or IB courses in high school can earn College credits for courses ranging from 101 to 204, depending on their scores.  Please consult the equivalency table on the Office of Admissions website.

Placement Testing

  • Students who have studied French, German, or Spanish in high school and who wish to continue the study of these languages at WVU must take a computerized placement test before entering the program.  The placement test can be taken one time only and must be taken before completing any coursework in the languages at WVU.
  • Students who have studied languages for which there is no placement test should check with the coordinator for that language if placement in a class above 101 is appropriate.
     
  • Those who complete the course in which they are placed with a B or better will be eligible to apply for retroactive credit for all applicable courses in the 101, 102, 203, and 204 sequences out of which they placed.  Fees for this back credit are waived. 

Credit by Examination

The Department of World Languages offers a credit by examination program for elementary, intermediate, and some advanced classes in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish only.  Information about the program is available in the Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics.  Students must take an examination for each course, and a registration fee applies for each examination.

Additional Points of Information

  • World language courses are divided into elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels.
  • The elementary level, courses 101 and 102, provides beginning work in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing the languages, with emphasis
    on communicative competence. The vocabulary is limited to words of high frequency.
  • Courses numbered 100 are intensive and equal to courses 101 and 102. Students may receive credit for either course 101 and 102 or 100 but
    not for both.
  • The intermediate level, courses 203 and 204, continues training in the four basic skills, with greater emphasis on reading. The vocabulary is greatly
    extended, especially the passive or recognition vocabulary.
  • Courses numbered 200 are the intensive equivalent of courses 203 and 204. Students may receive credit for courses 203 and 204 or 200 but
    not both.
  • Advanced-level courses are numbered 300 or 400.
  • Core language courses are 301, 302, 303, and 304, except for Spanish where they are 310 or 314, 311, 312, and 313. In these courses, the
    four basic skills are further developed. All classroom questions and discussions are in the foreign language. The work is based on reading
    assignments followed by classroom discussions, oral drills, and written exercises.
  • Above 304, each language numbers courses differently. Please select courses carefully.

Students who earn a degree in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences must complete the University requirements, the College requirements for their specific degree program, and their major requirements.

Minors

All students have the possibility of earning one or more minors; view a list of all available minors and their requirements here. Please note that students may not earn a minor in their major field.

Certificate of Global Engagement

Students in the Eberly College, regardless of their major, can earn a Certificate of Global Engagement. Completion of the Certificate demonstrates the student’s knowledge of diverse cultures, as well as the ability to communicate and interact effectively with people of different cultural backgrounds.  Students will be required to apply their knowledge of contemporary issues and global social contexts to their course work and their broader citizenship.  For details regarding Certificate requirements, please visit the Eberly College page.

Admission Requirements

Entering freshmen are admitted directly into the major.  Students coming from the Center for Learning, Advising, and Student Success or another unit must meet minimum requirements: 2.0 overall and a minimum of one language course with at least a C- (language courses do not include FCLT, FLIT, LANG, LING).

Benchmark Expectations

By the end of the second year in the major, students must have completed the appropriate foreign language 204 course and LING 311. A progress review will be completed in the middle of the 3rd semester. Students must retain a 2.25 GPA in courses that count toward the major by their junior year. All majors must meet with a WLLL department adviser each semester. Students who do not  meet these benchmarks may be removed from their major.

General Education FOUNDATIONS

Please use this link to view a list of courses that meet each GEF requirement.

NOTE: Some major requirements will fulfill specific GEF requirements. Please see the curriculum requirements listed below for details on which GEFs you will need to select.

General Education Foundations
F1 - Composition & Rhetoric3-6
Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric
and Composition, Rhetoric, and Research
Accelerated Academic Writing
F2A/F2B - Science & Technology4-6
F3 - Math & Quantitative Skills3-4
F4 - Society & Connections3
F5 - Human Inquiry & the Past3
F6 - The Arts & Creativity3
F7 - Global Studies & Diversity3
F8 - Focus (may be satisfied by completion of a minor, double major, or dual degree)9
Total Hours31-37

Please note that not all of the GEF courses are offered at all campuses. Students should consult with their advisor or academic department regarding the GEF course offerings available at their campus.

Degree Requirements

Students must complete WVU General Education Foundations requirements, College B.A. requirements, major requirements, and electives to total a minimum of 120 hours. For complete details on these requirements, visit the B.A. Degrees tab on the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences page.

Departmental Requirements for the B.A. in World Languages, Literature, and Linguistics

Students may select from six areas of emphasis (three language areas of emphasis in French, German, and Spanish; and three language studies areas of emphasis in Chinese studies, Italian studies and Russian studies) to complete a bachelor of arts in world languages.  Each area of emphasis requires thirty-three hours of coursework beyond the intermediate level (203–204 or the equivalent) in the language of study, including a three-credit capstone experience.  The capstone may be taken anytime after completion of twenty-one hours beyond the intermediate level (204 or the equivalent).

  • Capstone Requirement: The university requires the successful completion of a Capstone course. The Capstone course is designated based upon the Area of Emphasis completed.
     
  • Writing and Communication Skills Requirement: The World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics Bachelor of Arts is a SpeakWrite Certified ProgramTM across each language Area of Emphasis.  SpeakWrite Certified programs incorporate and develop students’ written, verbal, visual, and mediated communication skills across the curriculum.
     
  • Calculation of GPA in the Major:  World language majors must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.25, both overall and in the major, to qualify for graduation.
     
  • Residency Requirements: Students completing a major in world languages/world language studies at WVU must fulfill a residency requirement by completing at least fifteen credit hours on campus in their language/area of study, excluding courses numbered 100, 101, 102, 200, 203, 204, 493, and courses obtained through credit by examination.

Curriculum Requirements

University Requirements37
First Year Seminar
GEF: Number of electives may vary depending on overlap
ECAS B.A. Requirements12
Foreign Language
Fine Arts Requirement
Global Studies and Diversity Requirement
Area of Emphasis Requirement *33
General Electives38
Number of electives may vary depending on overlap
Total Hours120
*

For specific requirements for the Areas of Emphasis and a Suggested Plan of Study, see the AOE tab.

 
 

Major Learning Goals

world languages, literatures, and linguistics

Upon successful completion of the B.A. degree, World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics majors will meet the following goals:

  1. Cultural Content Goal: Demonstrate an understanding of the connections among the perspectives, practices and products of a culture.
  2. Literary/Cultural Texts Content Goal: Demonstrate ability to interpret and reflect upon literary and cultural texts in their historical contexts.
  3. Language Proficiency Goal: Express their own ideas and interpret the messages of others in the target language at the advanced level of proficiency.
  4. Language Knowledge Goal: Demonstrate knowledge of the systematic and changing nature of language as applied to the language of study.
  5. Critical Thinking Goal: Relate cultural and linguistic knowledge to their own experiences and to the study of other disciplines.
  6. Affective Goal: Accept and appreciate fundamental differences among cultures and languages and to seek opportunities for continued learning on their own.

Areas of Emphasis

Chinese Studies area of emphasis requirements

Language Courses15
Select five of the following courses: *
Third Year Chinese 1
Third Year Chinese 2
Readings in Modern Chinese 1
Readings in Modern Chinese 2
Business Chinese
Chinese Media
Intensive Mandarin Chinese 2
Independent Study
* May include Upper-division Study Abroad Courses
Literature and Culture Requirement6
Select two of the following courses:
Chinese Civilization and Culture
Chinese Literature Translation 1
Chinese Literature in Translation 2
Chinese Studies Electives9
Select three courses in any of the following categories:
1. Alternate upper-division courses in Chinese language
2. Alternate FLIT or FCLT courses in Chinese literature or culture
3. Courses from another related field in or outside of the department, with approval of adviser, or any of the following:
Modern China
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
Government of China
Religions of China and Japan
Capstone3
Senior Thesis
Total Hours33

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
WVUE 1911ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3
GEF 23GEF 43
GEF 33GEF 53
CHIN 1013CHIN 1023
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective2 
 15 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHIN 2033ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3
GEF 23CHIN 2043
ECAS Fine Arts Requirement (GEF 6)3CHIN Literature & Culture Course 23
Chinese Lit & Culture Course 13General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHIN 3013CHIN 3023
CHIN 3033CHIN 3043
CHIN Studies Elective13GEF 8*3
ECAS Global Studies and Diversity Requirement (GEF 7)3GEF 8*3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CHIN 4613CHIN 496 (Capstone)3
CHIN Studies Elective 23General Elective 3
CHIN Studies Elective 33General Elective3
GEF 8*3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120


 

French area of emphasis requirements

Core Courses12
Language Through Civilization
Language Through Culture
Structure and Communication
Advanced Readings
Literature Requirement3
Survey of Literature 1
Survey of Literature 2
Culture Requirement3
French Civilization
Contemporary Culture
General Requirement3
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
Electives9
Select 3 classes from
1-Additional upper-division French classes (may include alternate courses from above or below)
2-Up to 3 credits in FLIT 230-239, 330-339, FCLT 230-239, 330-339, or a course in a directly related area approved by the department.
Capstone Requirement:3
Survey of Literature 1
Survey of Literature 2
French Civilization
Contemporary Culture
French Cinema
Senior Thesis
Total Hours33

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
WVUE 1911ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3
GEF 23FRCH 2006
GEF 43GEF 23
FRCH 1006General Elective3
General Elective2 
 15 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3GEF 53
GEF 33ECAS Fine Arts Requirement (GEF 6)3
FRCH 301 (GEF 8)3FRCH 3033
FRCH 3023FRCH 3043
LING 3113General Elective3
 15 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
GEF 8*3GEF 8*3
ECAS Global Studies and Diversity Requirement (GEF 7)3FRCH Elective 13
French Literature Requirement3FRCH Elective 23
General Elective3FRCH Elective 33
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
FRCH Culture Requirement3FRCH 496 (Capstone)3
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120
*

 Students completing a minor, a major or a dual degree already meet F 8.


 

German area of emphasis requirements

Core Courses12
Conversations in Context 1: Germany and its Past
Conversations in Context 2: Germany Today
Communication through Culture: Building the German Nation
Stories and Histories: Reading and Writing German- Speaking Culture
Literature Requirement3
German Literature: Fables/Fairy Tales/Enlightenment -Romanticism
German Literature: Since Romanticism
Culture Requirement3
German Cultural History: 350-1700
German Cultural History Since 1945
General Requirement3
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
Electives9
Select 3 classes from
1-Additional upper-division German classes (may include alternate courses from above or below)
2-Up to 3 credits in FLIT 220-229, 320-329, FCLT 220-229, 320-329, or a course in a directly related area approved by the department.
Capstone Requirement3
Senior Thesis
German Cultural History Since 1945
Total Hours33

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
WVUE 1911ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3
GEF 23GEF 23
GEF 33GEF 53
GEF 43GER 1023
GER 1013General Elective3
General Elective2 
 15 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3ECAS Global Studies and Diversity Requirement (GEF 7)3
GER 2033GER 2043
General Elective3LING 3113
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
GEF 8*3GEF 8*3
GEF 8*3GER 3023
GER 3013GER 3043
GER 3033General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
GER Literature Requirement (ECAS Fine Arts Requirement; GEF 6)3GER 496 (Capstone)3
GER Elective 13GER Elective 33
GER Elective 23GER Culture Requirement3
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120
*

 Students completing a minor, a second major or a dual degree already fulfill F 8.


 

Italian Studies area of emphasis requirements

Language Courses15
Select five of the following courses:
Language Through Culture
Italian Through Film
Composition and Conversation
Advanced Conversation
Survey of Italian Literature 1
Survey of Italian Literature 2
Italian Folktales
Modern Italian Civilization
Electives15
Select five of the following courses
1. Unrestricted Electives
Alternate ITAL 300- or 400-level course from the list above
L'Italia Dal Vivo
Survey of Art History 2
Italian Renaissance
Baroque
Greek and Roman Civilization and Culture
Greek and Roman Myths
Italian-American Experience
Italian Cinema 1945 to Present
Italian Women Writers
Renaissance and Reformation
Greece and Rome
History of Italy, 1200-1800
History of Italy since 1800
Rome: From Romulus to Zenobia
The Italian Renaissance
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
2. Restricted Electives: no more than three courses from the following may be included in the 15 elective hours
Survey of Art History 1
Medieval
History of Ancient Times: Stone Age to the Fall of Rome
Absolutism & Enlightenment
The Mediterranean 1200-1800
History of Fascism
History of the Alps
Capstone3
Senior Thesis
Professional Field Experience
Total Hours33

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
WVUE 1911ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3
GEF 23GEF 23
GEF 33GEF 53
GEF 43ECAS Fine Arts Requirement (GEF 6)3
ITAL 1013ITAL 1023
General Elective2 
 15 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3GEF 8*3
GEF 8*3GEF 8*3
ITAL 2033ITAL 2043
General Elective3ITAL Studies Elective 13
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ITAL Lang Course 13ITAL Lang Course 33
ITAL Lang Course 23ITAL Lang Course 43
ECAS Global Studies and Diversity Requirement (GEF 7)3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ITAL Lang Course 53ITAL 496 (Capstone)3
ITAL Studies Elective 23ITAL Studies Elective 43
ITAL Studies Elective 33ITAL Studies Elective 53
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120
*

 Students completing a minor, a second major or a dual degree already fulfill F 8.


 

Russian Studies area of emphasis requirements

Language courses15
Select five from the following courses:
Conversation and Composition 1
Conversation and Composition 2
Advanced Structure and Reading 1
Advanced Structure and Reading 2
The Russian Short Story
The Russian Short Story
Survey of Russian Literature
Survey of Russian Literature
Russian Culture
Electives15
Select two from the following culture/literature courses:
Russian Fairy Tales
Science Fiction: East and West
Russian Literature Translation 1
Russian Literature Translation 2
Select three from the following history/linguistics courses:
History of Russia to 1917
History of Russia: 1900-Present
Revolutionary Russia: 1900-1953
USSR and After: 1953 to Present
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
Any alternate upper-division courses in Russian
Additional FCLT, FLIT, or RUSS courses or upper-division study abroad courses with approval of adviser
Capstone3
Senior Thesis
Total Hours33

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
WVUE 1911ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3
GEF 23GEF 23
GEF 33GEF 43
RUSS 1013RUSS 1023
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective2 
 15 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3ECAS Fine Arts Requirement (GEF 6)3
GEF 53RUST Lit & Cult Course 23
RUST Lit & Cult Course 13RUSS 2043
RUSS 2033General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ECAS Global Studies & Diversity Requirement (GEF 7)3GEF 8 *3
RUSS Language Course 13GEF 8 *3
RUST Hist & Ling 13RUSS Language Course 23
General Elective3RUSS Language Course 33
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
RUSS Language Course 43RUSS 496 (Capstone)3
RUSS Language Course 53RUST Hist & Ling 33
RUST Hist & Ling 23GEF 8*3
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120
*

 Students completing a minor, a second major or a dual degree already fulfill F 8.

Spanish area of emphasis requirements

Core Courses12
Spanish for Heritage Speakers
Spanish Conversation
Readings in Spanish
Writing in the Hispanic World
Spanish Through Media
Literature and Culture Requirement6
Select one combination
Spanish American Literature
and Culture of Spain
Spanish Literature
and Latin American Culture
Electives9
Select 3 classes from
1-Additional upper-division Spanish classes (may include alternate courses from above or below)
2-Up to 3 credits in FLIT 260-269, 360-369, FCLT 260-269, 360-369, or a course in a directly related area approved by the department.
General Requirement3
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
Capstone Experience3
Issues in the Hispanic World
Hispanic Presence in the World
Total Hours33

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
WVUE 1911ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3
GEF 23GEF 23
GEF 33SPAN 2006
SPAN 1006General Elective3
General Elective2 
 15 15
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3GEF 53
GEF 43ECAS Fine Arts Requirement (GEF 6)3
LING 3113SPAN 3123
SPAN 3113General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
SPAN 3133GEF 8 *3
SPAN 3143GEF 8 *3
General Elective3Spanish Literature Requirement3
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
GEF 8 *3SPAN Capstone3
SPAN Culture Requirement (ECAS Global Studies and Diversity Requirement (GEF7)3SPAN Elective 23
SPAN Elective 13SPAN Elective 33
General Elective3General Elective3
General Elective3General Elective3
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120
*

 Students completing a minor, a second major or a dual degree already fulfill F 8.

arabic studies minor

Minor Code - U140

The minor in Arabic Studies is an interdisciplinary program recognizing students’ successful completion of coursework focusing on the language, culture, history, politics, and economies of the Middle East.

The minor requires successful completion of 15 credit hours, 9 of which must be upper-division (300- and 400-level), and 12 of which must be unique (not counted toward another major or minor). Students must achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor. At least six hours must be taken in residence at WVU.

Core Courses9
Select three courses from the following:
Arabic Conversation 1
Arabic Conversation 2
Advanced Arabic Structure
Readings in Arabic
Literature and Culture3
One course selected from:
Modern Arabic Literature
Arab Women Writers
Area Electives3
Three hours selected from:
Geography of the Middle East
East Africa to 1895
Introduction to World Religons
History and Practice of Islam
An additional ARBC course above ARBC 204, excluding those counted toward the 9 hours of core courses above.
Total Hours15

French Minor

Minor Code - U007

Students must achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor.

Core Courses6
Choose 2 classes
Language Through Civilization
Language Through Culture
Structure and Communication
Advanced Readings
Upper-Division Electives *9
Select 3 classes from
1-Alternate 301-304 courses
2-Additional upper-division French classes
3-Up to 3 credits in FLIT 230-239, 330-339, FCLT 230-239, 330-339, or LING 311, or a course in a directly related area approved by the department.
Total Hours15
*

At least six of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination).

German Minor

Students must achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor.

Minor Code - U008

Core Courses6
Choose two classes;
Conversations in Context 1: Germany and its Past
Conversations in Context 2: Germany Today
Communication through Culture: Building the German Nation
Stories and Histories: Reading and Writing German- Speaking Culture
Upper-Division Electives *9
Choose 3 classes:
1- Alternate 301-304 classes
2- Additional upper-division German courses
3- Up to 3 credits in FLIT 220-229, 320-329, FCLT 220-229, 320-329, or LING 311, or a course in a directly related area approved by the department.
Total Hours15
*

At least 6 of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination.)

Spanish Minor

MINOR CODE - U011

Students must achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor.

Core Courses6
Choose two classes:
Readings in Spanish
Writing in the Hispanic World
Spanish Through Media
Spanish Conversation
Spanish for Heritage Speakers
Upper-Division Electives *9
Choose two classes:
1- Alternate SPAN 310-314 classes
2- Additional upper-division Spanish courses
3- up to 3 credits in FLIT 260-269, 360-369, FCLT 260-269, 360-369, or LING 311, or a course in a directly related area approved by the department.
Total Hours15
*

At least six of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination).

Chinese Studies Minor

Minor Code - U086

Students must achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor.

Core Courses12
Culture Requirement:
Chinese Civilization and Culture
Select three language courses: *
Third Year Chinese 1
Third Year Chinese 2
Readings in Modern Chinese 1
Readings in Modern Chinese 2
Business Chinese
Chinese Media
Upper-Division Electives **3
Select one class:
1. Alternate upper division courses in Chinese language
2. Alternate FLIT or FCLT courses in Chinese literature or culture
3. Courses from another related field in or outside of the department, with approval of Chinese Studies advisor, including HIST 325, LING 311, POLS 354, and RELG 231.
Total Hours15
*

Upper-Division CHIN courses earned through Study Abroad may also be applied.

**

At least six of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination).

Italian Studies Minor

Students must achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor.*

MINOR CODE - U054

Core Courses6
Select two classes:
Language Through Culture
Italian Through Film
Composition and Conversation
Advanced Conversation
Survey of Italian Literature 1
Survey of Italian Literature 2
Italian Folktales
Modern Italian Civilization
Electives9
Select up to three courses from the following lists. At least 3 elective hours (9 of the 15 hours for the minor) must be at the upper-division (300-400) level. **
1. Unrestricted Electives:
Alternative ITAL courses from list of core courses above
L'Italia Dal Vivo
Survey of Art History 2
Italian Renaissance
Baroque
Greek and Roman Civilization and Culture
Greek and Roman Myths
Italian-American Experience
Italian Cinema 1945 to Present
Italian Women Writers
Renaissance and Reformation
Greece and Rome
Rome: From Romulus to Zenobia
History of Italy, 1200-1800
History of Italy since 1800
Rome: From Romulus to Zenobia
The Italian Renaissance
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
2. Restricted Electives
Up to six hours may be chosen from the following:
Survey of Art History 1
Medieval
History of Ancient Times: Stone Age to the Fall of Rome
Absolutism & Enlightenment
The Mediterranean 1200-1800
History of Fascism
History of the Alps
Total Hours15
*

At least six of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination).

**

Substitutions must be approved by the Italian Studies program coordinator.

Japanese Studies Minor

MINOR CODE - U092

Students must achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor.
Core Courses12
Culture Requirement
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Japanese Culture
Japanese Culture and Cinema
Select three of the following: *
Conversation and Composition 1
Conversation and Composition 2
Advanced Structure
Advanced Reading
Japanese Culture
Upper-Division Electives **3
Select one of the following:
1- Any alternate 300- or 400-level JAPN course, or alternate FCLT 206 or 306, not applied to core courses
2- Any of the following courses:
Japanese Culture Immersion
Japanese Literature Translation
Modern Japan
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
Environmental Policy
Government of Japan
Religions of China and Japan
Total Hours15
*

 Upper-Division JAPN courses earned through Study Abroad may also be applied.

**

At least six of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination).

Russian Studies Minor

Students must achieve an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor.

MINOR CODE - U072

Core Courses12
Select four of the following:
Conversation and Composition 1
Conversation and Composition 2
Advanced Structure and Reading 1
Advanced Structure and Reading 2
The Russian Short Story
The Russian Short Story
Survey of Russian Literature
Survey of Russian Literature
Russian Culture
Elective3
Select one from any of these groups:
1. Any alternate upper-division courses in Russian; *
2. FCLT/FLIT courses, selected from:
Russian Fairy Tales
Science Fiction: East and West
Russian Literature Translation 1
Russian Literature Translation 2
3. Other electives with approval of advisor.
Total Hours15
*

At least six of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination).

Foreign Literature in Translation Minor

Minor Code - U006

A student must earn an overall GPA of 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor. At least two different national literatures must be represented in the selection of courses.

Required Courses
Select 5 courses from at least two areas *15
Chinese
FLIT or FCLT courses 210-219, 310-319 or 410-419.
French
FLIT or FCLT courses 230-239, 330-339, 430-439.
German
FLIT or FCLT courses 220-229, 320-329, 420-429.
Italian
FLIT or FCLT courses 240-249, 340-349, 440-449.
Japanese
FLIT or FCLT courses 200-209, 300-309, 400-409.
Russian
FLIT or FCLT courses 250-259, 350-359, 450-459.
Spanish
FLIT or FCLT courses 260-269, 360-369, 460-469.
Total Hours15
*

At least six of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination).

Linguistics Minor

MINOR CODE - U009

Students must earn an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor.

Core Courses9
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
Introduction to Language
Phonology
Syntax
Upper-Division Electives *6
Choose 2 courses from the following
History of the English Language
Topics in English Language
Phonetics and Pronunciation
German Pronunciation
Second Language Acquisition
The Teaching of Foreign Languages
Structure of Modern French
Phonetics and Pronunciation
Total Hours15
*

At least six of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination).

Qualified students may also apply 500-level courses to the upper-division electives. 500-level classes are only available to juniors who have earned a GPA of 3.00 minimum; the instructor's and the Dean's permission are mandatory.

Teaching English as a Second Language Minor

MINOR CODE - U050

Students must earn an overall GPA of at least 2.25 in the coursework applied toward the minor.

Core Courses12
Introduction to Structural Linguistics
Second Language Acquisition
The Teaching of Foreign Languages
English as a Second Language Linguistics
Upper-Division Electives *3
Second Language Reading
Total Hours15
*

At least six of the upper-division hours must be completed on campus (exclusive of courses numbered 493 or courses obtained through credit by examination).

Qualified students may also apply 500-level courses to the upper-division electives. 500-level classes are only available to juniors who have earned a GPA of 3.00 minimum; the instructor's and the Dean's permission are mandatory.

Arabic Courses

ARBC 101. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic 1. 3 Hours.

ARBC 102. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ARBC 101. Continuation of ARBC 101.

ARBC 203. Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic 1. 3 Hours.

PR: ARBC 102 or equiv. Continuation of ARBC 102.

ARBC 204. Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ARBC 203 or consent. Continuation of ARBC 203.

ARBC 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ARBC 298A-Z. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

ARBC 303. Arabic Conversation 1. 3 Hours.

PR: ARBC 203 or consent. Advanced communication course in Arabic. The course targets all language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) with a major focus on developing communication skills in Arabic to handle a variety of social situations.

ARBC 304. Arabic Conversation 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ARBC 204. A lecture and discussion course designed to build communicative abilities and conversational fluency in Arabic at the intermediate-advanced level. Particular emphasis on writing descriptive and narrative short essays, reading and discussing authentic texts, and presenting information about a variety of topics in Arabic.

ARBC 305. Advanced Arabic Structure. 3 Hours.

PR: ARBC 204. A lecture and discussion course designed to develop communicative abilities in Arabic at the intermediate-advanced level. Particular emphasis on reading authentic texts and reviewing Arabic structures; integrating grammar and vocabulary practices; and reading, discussing, and writing short essays about a variety of texts that tackle social and cultural issues related to the Arab world.

ARBC 306. Readings in Arabic. 3 Hours.

PR: ARBC 204. A lecture and discussion course designed to develop knowledge of Arabic structures and vocabulary practices through reading, writing, and translating linguistically relevant authentic texts from Arabic media resources and Al-Kitaab at the intermediate-advanced level in Modern Standard Arabic.

ARBC 393A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ARBC 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

ARBC 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

ARBC 492A-Z. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

ARBC 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ARBC 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

ARBC 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

ARBC 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

ARBC 497. Research. 1-6 Hours.

Independent research projects.

Bibliography Courses

BIBY 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

BIBY 492. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

BIBY 493. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

BIBY 494. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

BIBY 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

Chinese Courses

CHIN 101. First Year Chinese 1. 3 Hours.

PR: No prior study of the language. Introduction to the sound and writing systems of the language, with emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing within an authentic cultural context. (3 hr. lec.).

CHIN 102. First Year Chinese 2. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 101. Continuation of CHIN 101. Continued development of basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. (3 hr. lec.).

CHIN 203. Second Year Chinese 1. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 102 or equiv. Continuation of CHIN 102. Continued development of basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. (3 hr. lec.).

CHIN 204. Second Year Chinese 2. 3 Hours.

PR:CHIN 203 or equiv. Continuation of CHIN 203. Continued development of basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese.

CHIN 271. Intensive Mandarin Chinese 1. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 102 or equivalent. Faculty-led study abroad course. Development of oral and written communication skills in Chinese through classroom activities and outside of class assignments in an authentic cultural environment.

CHIN 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CHIN 301. Third Year Chinese 1. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 204. Continued development of oral and written communicative skills in Chinese.

CHIN 302. Third Year Chinese 2. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 301. Continued development of oral and written communicative skills in Chinese.

CHIN 303. Readings in Modern Chinese 1. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 204. Development of communicative skills, with emphasis on reading modern Chinese texts.

CHIN 304. Readings in Modern Chinese 2. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 303. Development of communicative skills, with emphasis on reading modern Chinese texts.

CHIN 461. Business Chinese. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 302 or CHIN 304. Advanced training in vocabulary, sentence structures, and rhetoric in business Chinese.

CHIN 465. Chinese Media. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 302 or CHIN 304. Advanced training in vocabulary, sentence structure, and rhetoric of Chinese media.

CHIN 471. Intensive Mandarin Chinese 2. 3 Hours.

PR: CHIN 204 or equivalent. Faculty-led study abroad course. Development of advanced oral and written communication skills through classroom activities and outside of class assignments, including interaction with native speakers in an authentic cultural environment.

CHIN 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

CHIN 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

CHIN 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CHIN 494. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

CHIN 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CHIN 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

CHIN 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

Classics Courses

CLAS 101. Elementary Latin 1. 3 Hours.

CLAS 102. Elementary Latin 2. 3 Hours.

PR: CLAS 101. Continuation of CLAS 101.

CLAS 203. Intermediate Latin 1. 3 Hours.

PR: CLAS 102 or two years of high school Latin.

CLAS 204. Intermediate Latin 2. 3 Hours.

PR: CLAS 203 or two years of high school Latin.

CLAS 231. Greek and Roman Civilization and Culture. 3 Hours.

CLAS 232. Greek and Roman Myths. 3 Hours.

CLAS 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CLAS 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

CLAS 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

CLAS 492. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading and/or research.

CLAS 493. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CLAS 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CLAS 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

CLAS 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

English as a Second Language Courses

ESL 140. English as a Second Language Academic Reading/Writing. 3 Hours.

For undergraduate (and graduate) international students. Develops the skills necessary to improve academic reading skills to write well-organized and self-edited essays in a variety of rhetorical modes.

ESL 240. English as a Second Language Research and Writing. 3 Hours.

Provides undergraduate and graduate international students with the skills, strategies, and procedures necessary for researching a topic and writing a well-organized and logical research paper.

ESL 250. Speaking and Listening. 3 Hours.

For undergraduate and graduate international students. Provides guidance and practice in general and academic speaking and listening skills and improves oral comprehensibility through pronunciation activities.

ESL 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ESL 350. International Teaching Assistants Fluency. 3 Hours.

Designed for graduate students wishing to become International Teaching Assistants (ITAs). Course focuses on the characteristics of effective oral communication in English in order to improve SPEAK test scores and comprehensibility in the classroom.

ESL 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

ESL 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

ESL 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ESL 494. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

ESL 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

ESL 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

Foreign Culture Courses

FCLT 160. Spanish Civilization. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an understanding of and an appreciation for Spanish culture throughout history.

FCLT 161. The Many Latin Americas. 3 Hours.

Introduction to Latin American Studies. Surveys primary documents from Latin American history and a range of disciplinary perspectives on Latin America's past and present.

FCLT 206. Introduction to Japanese Culture. 3 Hours.

A survey course taught in English that introduces Japanese institutions, language, philosophy, religion, theater, family and marriage, and Japanese social etiquette.

FCLT 210. Chinese Civilization and Culture. 3 Hours.

This is a survey course taught in English that introduces Chinese institutions, language philosophy, religion, art, literature, family and marriage, and Chinese social etiquette.

FCLT 240. Italian-American Experience. 3 Hours.

This course will investigate literary and historical perspectives on the experience of Italians in the United States and their contributions to U.S. culture. The approach will be multidisciplinary. This class will be taught in English.

FCLT 250. Russian Fairy Tales. 3 Hours.

Introduces a wide selection of Russian fairy tales and examines the aesthetic, social, and psychological values that they reflect, a general introduction to the study of folklore with a broad spectrum of approaches (psychoanalysis, structuralism, feminism).

FCLT 260. Cultures of Mexico. 3 Hours.

An in-depth survey of contemporary Mexican culture, including Mexico's complex history and regional subcultures, Mexican art and literature, linguistic diversity, geography, and politics.

FCLT 280. Science Fiction: East and West. 3 Hours.

Comparison of science fiction texts, and TV from Eastern and Central Europe and the US and UK, analyzing works that posit Fantastic spatial, temporal, social, and biological explorations beyond those currently verified by science.

FCLT 281. Vampire: Blood and Revolution. 3 Hours.

This course examines the phenomenon of vampirism in verbal and visual culture, vampirism is examined from different periods in various cultures and from a variety of critical perspectives. It contestualizes the works in the cultures that produce them.

FCLT 293A-L. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FCLT 298A-D. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

FCLT 298D. Honors. PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

FCLT 306. Japanese Culture and Cinema. 3 Hours.

An overview of Japanese cinema. This course will discuss the development of Japanese cinema as an art form and the social influences that affected it.

FCLT 307. Japanese Culture Immersion. 3 Hours.

Faculty-led study abroad course combining travel with cultural learning. Students learn Japanese culture, traditions, and customs through lectures, workshops, visits to historical and religious sites, and interaction with local Japanese people.

FCLT 310. Chinese Cinema. 3 Hours.

A study of representative Chinese films from the early twentieth century to the present; films subtitled, readings and discussion in English.

FCLT 311. The Chinese Experience. 3 Hours.

Faculty-led study abroad course covering Chinese culture, traditions, costumes, and the development of modern Chinese society through lectures, workshops, visits to historical landmarks, and interaction with the local Chinese people.

FCLT 321. Gods and Heroes of Nordic Mythology. 3 Hours.

This course examines the historical events, peoples, cultural artifacts and traditions of medieval Scandinavian civilization, as well as, literature in translation from 400 C.E. to the end of the Viking Age in roughly 1066 C.E.

FCLT 340. Italian Cinema 1945 to Present. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to key topics of modern Italian culture and history as explored through cinema. It will focus on a selection of Italian films from World War II to the present.

FCLT 360. Latin American Cinema. 3 Hours.

Examination of film from Latin America in socio-cultural context.

FCLT 380. Holocaust: Eastern Europe Film and Literature. 3 Hours.

Extending beyond familiar representations of the Holocaust in the context of several nations of Eastern Europe.

FCLT 381. Contemporary Polish Cinema. 3 Hours.

This course studies contemporary Polish cinema from World War II to present, examining films in both their aesthetic and sociohistorical contexts as part of European and Polish national cinematic traditions.

FCLT 382. Polish Cinema: Kieslowski. 3 Hours.

Studies the cinematic career of one of Poland's most important directors of the past 50 years; designed to allow both cinema devotees and untrained filmgoers to appreciate Kieslowski's oeuvre.

FCLT 383. Faculty Led Travel: Romania. 1 Hour.

Faculty-led study abroad trip combining travel with cultural learning, at various locations throughout the country. Students visit important landmarks and learn about Romanian history, culture, and folk beliefs.

FCLT 384. Faculty-Led Travel: Prague. 1 Hour.

Faculty-led study abroad course combining travel with cultural learning. Students visit architectural landmarks in Prague and selected Czech cities.

FCLT 385. Faculty-Led Travel: Polish Culture. 1 Hour.

Faculty-led study abroad trip combining travel with cultural learning, in Warsaw, Krakow, and Lodz. Students visit important landmarks and attend lectures. Also includes visit to Auschwitz-Birkenau.

FCLT 393A-N. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FCLT 460. Sexuality and Gender in Hispanic Cinema. 3 Hours.

Analyzes perspectives of gender and sexuality in Hispanic culture using portrayals of those issues in films from/about Latin America, Spain and the US Latino/a community. Applies theoretical and social/cultural constructs to evaluating explicit and implicit messages in these films and the role of media portrayals in both reflecting and shaping social norms in Hispanic culture.

FCLT 488. Capstone Latin American Studies. 3 Hours.

Capstone experience required for all Latin American Studies majors. Options include study abroad, internships, service learning, and a senior research project.

FCLT 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

FCLT 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent (may be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

FCLT 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FCLT 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

Foreign Lit in Translation Courses

FLIT 135. Introduction to French Literature. 3 Hours.

Major writers and representative movements in French literature from its beginning to present.

FLIT 200. Latin Literature Translation 1. 3 Hours.

FLIT 201. Latin Literature Translation 2. 3 Hours.

FLIT 203. Japanese Literature Translation. 3 Hours.

Survey of selected works of Japanese literature from ancient period to the mid-nineteenth century and an introduction to a few works of the modern period.

FLIT 216. Chinese Literature Translation 1. 3 Hours.

Readings in the literature of China from its beginnings through the end of the imperial era in 1922; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history. Readings, and discussion in English.

FLIT 217. Chinese Literature in Translation 2. 3 Hours.

Selected Chinese literary works since 1911; attention to major writers and genres; readings and discussion in English.

FLIT 227. German Literature in Translation 1. 3 Hours.

Selected German works from 800 A.D. to the period of Naturalism. Readings and discussion in English.

FLIT 228. German Literature in Translation 2. 3 Hours.

Selected German works from the period of Naturalism to the present. Readings and discussion in English.

FLIT 229. German Literature Since World War II. 3 Hours.

Selected German literature from 1945 to present. Readings and discussion in English.

FLIT 235. French Literature in Translation 1. 3 Hours.

Selected French works from the middle ages to the end of the eighteenth century. Readings and discussions in English.

FLIT 236. French Literature in Translation 2. 3 Hours.

Selected French works from the beginning of the nineteenth to present. Readings and discussions in English.

FLIT 237. French Women Writers. 3 Hours.

Selected works of French women writers.

FLIT 238. African Women Writers. 3 Hours.

Selected works by African Women Writers.

FLIT 239. Francophone Literature in Translation. 3 Hours.

Works by French-speaking authors from Africa and the Caribbean. French majors will read selections in the original.

FLIT 240. Italian Women Writers. 3 Hours.

An overview of Italian women writers active during the nineteenth and twentieth century, highlighting such issues as gender relationships, the experience of motherhood, the Italian family, the role of traditions, and feminism against the background of social and political circumstances of nineteenth and twentieth-century Italy. All readings and assignments will be in English.

FLIT 245. Italian Literature Translation 1. 3 Hours.

Selected Italian works from the twelfth century to the end of the eighteenth century. Readings and discussion in English.

FLIT 246. Italian Literature Translation 2. 3 Hours.

Selected Italian works from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings and discussion in English.

FLIT 256. Russian Literature Translation 1. 3 Hours.

Major works of Russian authors from the beginning to 1880, including those of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. Russian major will read selections in the original.

FLIT 257. Russian Literature Translation 2. 3 Hours.

Major literature of Russia/Soviet Union from 1880 to the present. Russian majors will read selections in the original.

FLIT 264. Spanish Literature Translation 1. 3 Hours.

Selected Spanish works from the twelfth century to the end of the eighteenth century. Readings and discussions in English.

FLIT 265. Spanish Literature Translation 2. 3 Hours.

Selected Spanish works from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings and discussion in English.

FLIT 266. Latin American Literature. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the diverse literary traditions of Latin America, this survey explores the historical roots that gave rise to modern Latin American literature.

FLIT 267. Women Writers of Spain. 3 Hours.

Major women writers of Spain from the earliest existing manuscripts to the present focus on 20th century works. Spanish majors will read selections in the original.

FLIT 268. Spanish American Literature in Translation 1. 3 Hours.

Selected Spanish American works from the sixteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century. Readings and discussion in English.

FLIT 269. Spanish American Literature in Translation 2. 3 Hours.

Selected Spanish American works from the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries. Readings and discussions in English.

FLIT 285. Brazilian Literature Translation. 3 Hours.

Survey of Brazilian literary masterworks in English translation concentrating heavily on prose forms (novel, novelette, short shorty, play) dating from the mid-nineteenth century.

FLIT 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FLIT 298A-E. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent from the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

FLIT 311. The Chinese Experience. 3 Hours.

Faculty-led study abroad course covering Chinese culture, traditions, costumes, and the development of modern Chinese society through lectures, workshops, visits to historical landmarks, and interaction with the local Chinese people.

FLIT 315. Modern Arabic Literature. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to major Arabic authors and acclaimed selections from Arabic literature of the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as historical landmarks that have contributed to the evolution of this literature. Taught in English.

FLIT 316. Arab Women Writers. 3 Hours.

Study of works by Arab women writers, created originally in Arabic and English, selected to introduce students to the literary traditions and historical contexts within which Arab women's writings are situated and to explore the themes and genre issues of those writings.

FLIT 360. Discovering Mesoamerica. 3 Hours.

PR: ENGL 102 and ENGL 103. Analyses cultural and linguistic diversity of Mesoamerica through in-depth study of the Aztec and Maya peoples, using literature and cultural artifacts, including pre-Colombian empires, wars of conquest, and centuries of resistance to Europeanization.

FLIT 361. Latin American Literature and Violence. 3 Hours.

Examination of key works of Latin American cultural production in translation related to contexts of physical and structural violence.

FLIT 393A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FLIT 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

FLIT 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

FLIT 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FLIT 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

FLIT 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

FLIT 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

French Courses

FRCH 100. Intensive Elementary French. 6 Hours.

PR: Appropriate score on the Departmental Placement Test or departmental consent. Equivalent of FRCH 101 and 102 combined into one course. (Course presumes no prior knowledge of the language.).

FRCH 101. Elementary French 1. 3 Hours.

PR: Appropriate score on the Departmental Placement Test or departmental consent. Introduction to the sound and writing systems of the language, with emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing within an authentic cultural context. (Course presumes no prior knowledge of the language.).

FRCH 102. Elementary French 2. 3 Hours.

PR: FRCH 101 or appropriate score on the Departmental Placement Test or departmental consent. Continuation of French 101.

FRCH 200. Intensive Intermediate French. 6 Hours.

PR: FRCH 102 or FRCH 100 or appropriate score on the Departmental Placement Test. FRCH 203 and FRCH 204 combined into one course. Last course in the basic French curriculum sequence and foundation for advanced French study. Emphasis on written and oral communication within an authentic cultural context.

FRCH 203. Intermediate French 1. 3 Hours.

PR: FRCH 100 or FRCH 102 or appropriate score on the Departmental Placement test. This is the third course in the basic French curriculum sequence and prepares students for FRCH 204.

FRCH 204. Intermediate French 2. 3 Hours.

PR: FRCH 203 or appropriate score on the Departmental Placement Test. This is the last course in the basic French curriculum sequence and serves as the foundation for advanced French study. Emphasis on written and oral communication within an authentic cultural context.

FRCH 274. Virtual Vendee. 3 Hours.

PR: FRCH 203 or appropriate score on the Departmental Placement Test. Taught on-line in conjunction with WVU-Vendee. Can count as FRCH 204 or as elective for French major/minor. French culture through podcasts, readings, and writings. Taught in French.

FRCH 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FRCH 301. Language Through Civilization. 3 Hours.

PR: FRCH 200 or FRCH 204 or FRCH 274 or adequate score on the Departmental Placement Test. Development of oral and written communicative skills in the context of the origins, development, and contributions of French and Francophone civilizations.

FRCH 302. Language Through Culture. 3 Hours.

PR: FRCH 200 or FRCH 204 or FRCH 274 or adequate score on the Departmental Placement Test. Development of oral and written communicative skills in the context of contemporary values, institutions and contributions of the French and Francophone world.

FRCH 303. Structure and Communication. 3 Hours.

PR: FRCH 200 or FRCH 204 or FRCH 274 or adequate score on the Departmental Placement Test. Development of communicative competencies with emphasis on French language structures, speaking, and writing within an authentic cultural context.

FRCH 304. Advanced Readings. 3 Hours.

PR: FRCH 200 or FRCH 204 or FRCH 274 or adequate score on the Departmental Placement Test. Development of communicative competencies with emphasis on authentic texts and documents from the French- speaking world.

FRCH 393A-E. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR:Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FRCH 401. Oral Expression. 3 Hours.

PR: Six hours at the 300-level, including either FRCH 301 or FRCH 302 or consent. Course not open to graduate students. Intensive practice of oral skills with emphasis on discussion, debate, recitation, reading aloud, etc.

FRCH 402. Phonetics and Pronunciation. 3 Hours.

PR: Six hours at the 300-level, including either FRCH 301 or FRCH 302 or consent.

FRCH 403. Introduction to French Stylistics. 3 Hours.

PR: FRCH 303 and (FRCH 301 or FRCH 302 or FRCH 304). Introduction to advanced grammar structures, stylistic techniques and oratory skills necessary to write and speak at an advanced level of language.

FRCH 421. Survey of Literature 1. 3 Hours.

PR: Six hours at the 300-level, including either FRCH 303 or FRCH 304 or consent. Course not open to graduate students. A cultural and historical survey from its beginning to the end of the eighteenth century.

FRCH 422. Survey of Literature 2. 3 Hours.

PR: Six hours at the 300-level, including either FRCH 303 or FRCH 304 or consent. Course not open to graduate students. A cultural and historical survey from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present.

FRCH 431. French Civilization. 3 Hours.

PR: Six hours at the 300-level, including either FRCH 301 or FRCH 302 or consent. A survey of major themes, movements, ideas, and figures in the development of French civilization from prehistory to the twentieth century.

FRCH 432. Contemporary Culture. 3 Hours.

PR: Six hours at the 300-level, including either FRCH 301 or FRCH 302 or consent.

FRCH 433. Francophone Cultures. 3 Hours.

PR: Six credit hours of FRCH courses at the 300-level. An examination of products, practices, and perspectives characteristic of various cultures of the French-speaking world.

FRCH 450. French Cinema. 3 Hours.

PR: Six hours at the 300-level, including either FRCH 301 or FRCH 302 or consent. Film literacy, vocabulary, and technique in the context of French cinema. Emphasis may vary among origins, poetic realism, surrealism, film noir, nouvelle vague, current movements. May be repeated with permission. Taught in French.

FRCH 461. Commercial French 1. 3 Hours.

PR: Six hours at the 300-level, including either FRCH 301 or FRCH 302 or consent. Development of advanced speaking, reading and writing skills appropriate for business contexts within the French-speaking world.

FRCH 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

FRCH 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

FRCH 492A. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading and or research.

FRCH 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FRCH 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

FRCH 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

FRCH 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

FRCH 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in the Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

German Courses

GER 101. Introduction to German Language and Culture 1. 3 Hours.

PR: Score of G1 on placement test or no prior study of the language or Consent. Introduction to the German language and German-speaking cultures. This course focuses on the development of cultural knowledge as well as interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities.

GER 102. Introduction to German Language and Culture 2. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 101. A continuation of GER 101 that focuses on the continued development of cultural knowledge as well as interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities.

GER 203. Intermediate German 1: The German-Speaking World. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 102 or equivalent. A continuation of GER 102 that develops intermediate interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills through extended practice in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing activities. The course focuses on cultural practices and perspectives unique to German-speaking regions today.

GER 204. Intermediate German 2: Life in Germany. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 203 or Consent. A continuation of German 203 that builds on students' understanding of German-speaking culture and that hones interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills. The course focuses on topics relating to the history and contemporary life of German-speaking regions and the development of reading skills through work on more advanced texts.

GER 222. German Pronunciation. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: GER 203. Designed to strengthen pronunciation through listening and speaking exercises focusing on intonation and diction. Students will improve their ability to hear differences in sounds, understand sound formation, and reproduce sounds in their own speech.

GER 246. Introduction to German Film. 3 Hours.

PR or CONC: GER 203. Historical overview of German cinema through viewing films (in German) and reading supplementary theoretical texts, students will learn about the history of film-making in Germany during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

GER 271. The German Experience 1. 3 Hours.

Beginning to intermediate culture course that practices speaking and writing skills while documenting the study abroad experience and increases students understanding of the target culture.

GER 272. German Grammar 1. 3 Hours.

Review of basic elements of German grammar while studying abroad.

GER 293A-Z. Special Topics. 0-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

GER 301. Conversations in Context 1: Germany and its Past. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 204. Advanced communication course that focuses on German history from 1800-1950. Students will develop all four language skills and review important grammatical structures.

GER 302. Conversations in Context 2: Germany Today. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 204. Advanced communication course that focuses on current events in Germany. Students will develop all four language skills and review important grammatical structures.

GER 303. Communication through Culture: Building the German Nation. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 204. Advanced communication course that focuses on the exploration of German identity and nationhood from 1806 to the present. Students will develop all four language skills and review important linguistic structures.

GER 304. Stories and Histories: Reading and Writing German- Speaking Culture. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 204. Advanced communication course that focuses on the experiences of minority and/or marginalized groups in German-speaking countries through texts and historical contexts. Students will develop all four language skills and review important linguistic structures.

GER 361. German for Business. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 204 or Consent. Advanced communication course that explores professional life in Germany. Students will develop practical speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills while developing a broad understanding of business, commerce, and industry.

GER 362. Professional Life in Germany. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 204. Course designed to prepare students for work or an internship in a German-speaking country. Students will become familiarized with the etiquette, culture, and practices within a professional setting in German and develop the necessary language skills and vocabulary to carry out professional transactions.

GER 393A. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

GER 401. TurboDeutsch: Intensive German in Review. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 301 or GER 302 or GER 303 or GER 304. TurboDeutsch is an advanced German language course that examines the fundamentals of the German language. Students will review basic structures and learn more complex forms in the language. This structural review will be contextualized through the study of current events in Germany.

GER 431. German Literature: Fables/Fairy Tales/Enlightenment -Romanticism. 3 Hours.

PR: One 300-level GER course or equivalent. Advanced German literature course that examines representative works, literary-historical periods, genres, and authors from 1700-1830.

GER 432. German Literature: Since Romanticism. 3 Hours.

PR: One 300-level GER course or equivalent. Advanced German literature course that examines representative works, literary-historical periods, genres, and authors from 1830-1955.

GER 440. German Cultural History: 350-1700. 3 Hours.

PR: One 300-level GER course or equivalent. Advanced course on German civilization that examines religious, cultural and social practices from the Germanic period through the Baroque era.

GER 441. German Cultural History Since 1945. 3 Hours.

PR: One 300-level GER course or equivalent. Advanced course on German civilization that examines historical and cultural divisions and developments since World War II.

GER 471. The German Experience 2. 3 Hours.

PR: GER 204 or consent. Advanced culture course that practices speaking and writing skills while documenting the study abroad experience and increases students' understanding of the target culture.

GER 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

GER 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

GER 492. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and or research.

GER 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

GER 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

GER 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

GER 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

GER 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

Intensive English Program Courses

IEP 000. Intensive English Program. 1-15 Hours.

Study in the Intensive English Program, with a focus on improving English language skills. Course does not count toward any degree program.

Italian Courses

ITAL 101. Elementary Italian 1. 3 Hours.

ITAL 102. Elementary Italian 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 101. Continuation of ITAL 101.

ITAL 203. Intermediate Italian 1. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 102. Continuation of ITAL 102.

ITAL 204. Intermediate Italian 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 203. Continuation of ITAL 203.

ITAL 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ITAL 301. Language Through Culture. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 204. Analyzes key topics in contemporary Italian popular culture, including the Italian family, young people, the role of women in Italian society, multiethnic Italy, and Italian fashion. Taught in Italian.

ITAL 302. Italian Through Film. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 204. Provides students with opportunity to improve their Italian conversational and writing skills through discussion of a variety of topics as they are represented in Italian cinema. Taught in Italian.

ITAL 303. Composition and Conversation. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 204.

ITAL 304. Advanced Conversation. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 204.

ITAL 331. Survey of Italian Literature 1. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 204. Overview of the history and key themes of Italian literature from the thirteenth through the eighteenth centuries. Taught in Italian.

ITAL 332. Survey of Italian Literature 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 204. Overview of the history and key themes of Italian literature from the nineteenth century to present. Taught in Italian.

ITAL 371. L'Italia Dal Vivo. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 204 or consent. This course allows students to improve their ability to communicate effectively in Italian with native speakers, orally and in writing, through a full-immersion experience in Italy. Can count for the Italian studies minor.

ITAL 393A-B. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR:Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ITAL 431. Italian Folktales. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 204. Overview of Italian popular culture through the analysis of Italo Calvino's collection of folktales within a comparative European perspective, using semiotic, linguistic, and psychoanalytic approaches. Taught in Italian.

ITAL 432. Modern Italian Civilization. 3 Hours.

PR: ITAL 204. Overview of Italian civilization and its manifestations in various cultural fields (history, literature, and cinema) from Fascism to the present. Taught in Italian.

ITAL 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

ITAL 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

ITAL 493A-K. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered by regularaly scheduled courses.

ITAL 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty-supervised study of topics on available through regular course offerings.

ITAL 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

ITAL 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

Japanese Courses

JAPN 101. Elementary Japanese 1. 3 Hours.

JAPN 102. Elementary Japanese 2. 3 Hours.

PR: JAPN 101. Continuation of JAPN 101.

JAPN 201. Japanese Language Immersion. 3 Hours.

PR: JAPN 102 or equivalent and PR or CONC: FCLT 307. Faculty-led study abroad course. Development of oral and written communication skills in Japanese through in-class and outside of class activities and assignments in an authentic cultural environment.

JAPN 203. Intermediate Japanese 1. 3 Hours.

PR: JAPN 102.

JAPN 204. Intermediate Japanese 2. 3 Hours.

PR: JAPN 203.

JAPN 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

JAPN 301. Conversation and Composition 1. 3 Hours.

PR: JAPN 204. Continued development of oral and written communicative skills in Japanese.

JAPN 302. Conversation and Composition 2. 3 Hours.

PR: JAPN 301. Continued development of oral and written communicative skills in Japanese.

JAPN 303. Advanced Structure. 3 Hours.

PR: JAPN 301. Development of communicative skills, with emphasis on polite speech and review of Japanese language structures.

JAPN 304. Advanced Reading. 3 Hours.

PR: JAPN 301. Development of communicative skills, with emphasis on reading authentic texts and review of Japanese language structures.

JAPN 441. Japanese Culture. 3 Hours.

PR: JAPN 301. A study of Japanese civilization, customs, and ethos. Taught in Japanese.

JAPN 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

JAPN 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to maximum of 18 hours). Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

JAPN 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

JAPN 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

JAPN 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

JAPN 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

JAPN 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

Language Teaching Methods Courses

LANG 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LANG 322. Second Language Acquisition. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 101 or LING 311 or equivalent. Study of linguistic concepts, development patterns, and contributing factors relevant to second language acquisition.

LANG 421. The Teaching of Foreign Languages. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Required of all students who are prospective foreign language teachers on the secondary level.

LANG 422. Second Language Reading. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 101 or LING 311 or equivalent. Study of the second language reading process, relevant research findings, curricular issues, and classroom instructional practices.

LANG 490F. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of Languages. NOTE: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on Assistantships to gain experience. Grading may be S/U.

LANG 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

LANG 492. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

LANG 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LANG 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

LANG 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

LANG 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

LANG 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

Linguistics Courses

LING 101. Introduction to Language. 3 Hours.

General introduction to the nature of human language, its sounds, structure, mechanisms, and forms (oral/sign); its evolution and variation, how it is learned and stored, and how it differs from animal communications systems.

LING 293. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LING 311. Introduction to Structural Linguistics. 3 Hours.

PR: ARBC 203 or CHIN 203 or CLAS 203 or FRCH 203 or GER 203 or ITAL 203 or JAPN 203 or PORT 203 or RUSS 203 or SPAN 203 or equivalent. Required of foreign language majors. A detailed examination of language structure (phonology, morphology, and syntax) and its relation to language use (sociolinguistics).

LING 393. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LING 402. Structure of Modern French. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 311 and 18 hours of French or consent. Study of phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern French together with a contrastive analysis of French and English.

LING 411. Phonology. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 101 or LING 311. Description of sounds and sound systems in language. Articulatory phonetics. Structuralist and generative approaches to phonemics.

LING 412. Syntax. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on generative syntax in English, German, Romance and Slavic languages.

LING 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

LING 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

LING 492. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

LING 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LING 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

LING 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

LING 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

LING 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

Portugese Courses

PORT 101. Elementary Portuguese 1. 3 Hours.

PORT 102. Elementary Portuguese 2. 3 Hours.

PR: PORT 101 or equivalent.

PORT 203. Intermediate Portuguese 1. 3 Hours.

PR: PORT 102 or equivalent.

PORT 204. Intermediate Portuguese 2. 3 Hours.

PR: PORT 203 or equivalent.

PORT 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

PORT 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

PORT 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours). Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

PORT 493A-L. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PORT 493L. Special Topics. 1-3Hr. PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

PORT 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PORT 494Z. Seminar. 1-3Hr. PR:Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

PORT 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

PORT 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

Russian Courses

RUSS 101. Elementary Russian 1. 3 Hours.

PR: No prior study of the language. Introduction to the sound and writing systems of the language, with emphasis on listening, reading, speaking, and writing.

RUSS 102. Elementary Russian 2. 3 Hours.

Continuation of RUSS 101. Introduction to the sound and writing systems of the language, with emphasis on listening, reading, speaking, and writing.

RUSS 203. Intermediate Russian 1. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 102. Continued development of basic skills in listening, reading, speaking, and writing Russian.

RUSS 204. Intermediate Russian 2. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 203. Continuation of RUSS 203. Capstone course for the RUSS 101 through 204 sequence and foundation for advanced Russian study. Continued development of basic skills in listening, reading, speaking, and writing Russian.

RUSS 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RUSS 301. Conversation and Composition 1. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204. Emphasis on development of written and oral communicative skills of contemporary Russian.

RUSS 302. Conversation and Composition 2. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 301. Continuation of RUSS 301. Emphasis on development of written and oral communicative skills of contemporary Russian.

RUSS 303. Advanced Structure and Reading 1. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204. Development of communicative skills, with emphasis on reading authentic texts and review of Russian language.

RUSS 304. Advanced Structure and Reading 2. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 303. Continuation of RUSS 303. Development of communicative skills, with emphasis on reading authentic texts and review of Russian language structures.

RUSS 331. The Russian Short Story. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204. Reading, discussing, and writing in Russian about short stories of selected nineteenth-century Russian writers.

RUSS 332. The Russian Short Story. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204. Reading, discussing, and writing in Russian about short stories of selected contemporary Russian writers.

RUSS 341. Survey of Russian Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204. Major works of selected Russian authors from the beginning through the nineteenth century, including those of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy.

RUSS 342. Survey of Russian Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204. Major works of selected Russian authors from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present.

RUSS 351. Russian Through Music. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204 or consent. Conducted in Russian. Course acquaints students with the diverse music styles and genres in Russian culture, and develops Russian language proficiency through exposure to authentic textual and audio-visual materials of Russian classical and contemporary songs and music pieces, as well as discussions.

RUSS 352. Russian in Action. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204 or consent. Conducted in Russian. Course helps students improve fluency and authentic flair of speech by providing intensive practice in contemporary standard Russian pronunciation, stress, and intonation. Course helps students improve pronunciation and aural sensitivity to Russian speech.

RUSS 393A-E. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RUSS 450. Modern Russian Society. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204 or consent. Conducted in Russian. For students in the fourth year of Russian or higher. Course improves students’ reading, speaking, listening, and grammatical skills, with a particular emphasis on post-Soviet language and culture. Topics focus on idiomatic language use and contemporary society.

RUSS 451. Russian Culture. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204. A study of Russian civilization, customs, and ethos.

RUSS 452. Business and Political Russian. 3 Hours.

PR: RUSS 204 or consent and recommended for students in third- or fourth-year Russian or higher. Conducted in Russian. Course advances competencies in formal communication and introduces basic concepts and topics from the business and political realms in contemporary Russian society, the Russian-speaking world, and the global workplace.

RUSS 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

RUSS 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 Hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

RUSS 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RUSS 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

RUSS 494Z. Seminar. 1-3Hr. PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

RUSS 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

RUSS 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

RUSS 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

Spanish Courses

SPAN 100. Intensive Elementary Spanish. 6 Hours.

PR: Score of S1 on placement test or no prior study of the language or departmental consent. Equivalent of SPAN 101 and 102 combined into one course.

SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish 1. 3 Hours.

PR: Score of S1 on placement test or no prior study of the language or departmental consent. Introduction to the sound and writing systems of the language with emphasis on listening, speaking, reading and writing within an authentic cultural context. (Course presumes no prior knowledge of the language.).

SPAN 102. Elementary Spanish 2. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 101 or score of S2 on placement exam. Continuation of SPAN 101. Introduction to the sound and writing systems of the language with emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing within an authentic cultural context.

SPAN 200. Intensive Intermediate Spanish. 6 Hours.

PR: SPAN 102 or SPAN 100 or consent. The equivalent of SPAN 203 and 204 combined into one course.

SPAN 203. Intermediate Spanish 1. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 102 or score of S3 on placement exam. Continuation of SPAN 102.

SPAN 204. Intermediate Spanish 2. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 203 or score of S4 on placement exam. Foundation for advanced study of Spanish. Emphasis on oral and written communication.

SPAN 260. Intensive Intermediate Spanish in Latin America. 3-6 Hours.

PR: SPAN 102. Development of intermediate reading writing, listening, and speaking skills taught on location, as part of a faculty-led program in Latin America.

SPAN 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

SPAN 298A. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Student in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

SPAN 310. Spanish for Heritage Speakers. 3 Hours.

Grammar, reading, writing, and culture for heritage speakers of Spanish with little or no formal education in Spanish language.

SPAN 311. Readings in Spanish. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 200 or SPAN 204 or a satisfactory score on the Spanish placement test. Major emphasis on improving reading skills in Spanish through comprehension exercises, discussion, and written analyses. Grammar review when appropriate.

SPAN 312. Writing in the Hispanic World. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 200 or SPAN 204 or a satisfactory score on the Spanish placement test. Major emphasis on improving writing skills in Spanish such as description, narration and argumentation through exposure to different types of cultural texts.

SPAN 313. Spanish Through Media. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 310 or SPAN 311 or SPAN 312. Explores Spanish language and Hispanic cultures through audio-visual materials.

SPAN 314. Spanish Conversation. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 311 or SPAN 312 or SPAN 313. Conversational skills are emphasized through class discussions and oral reports. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and SPAN 310.

SPAN 330. Latin American Culture. 3 Hours.

PR: Two courses from SPAN 310, SPAN 311, SPAN 312, SPAN 313, SPAN 314. Survey of Latin American Civilization and culture from Pre-Columbian period to the present.

SPAN 331. Early Spanish American Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 304. Readings in Spanish American literature from the colonial period to Modernism.

SPAN 332. Modern Spanish American Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 304. Readings in Spanish American literature from Modernism to the present.

SPAN 333. Spanish American Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: Two 300- level SPAN courses. Readings in Spanish American literature from the colonial period to the present.

SPAN 334. Seminar in Spanish American Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: Two courses from SPAN 310, SPAN 311, SPAN 312, SPAN 313, SPAN 314. In-depth study of key words of the Spanish American literary canon.

SPAN 335. Seminar in Spanish-American Culture. 3 Hours.

PR: 2 courses from SPAN 310, SPAN 311, SPAN 312, SPAN 313, SPAN 314. Examination of media, film, dance, music, visual arts, food, or other non-literary cultural production of Spanish America.

SPAN 340. Culture of Spain. 3 Hours.

PR: Two courses from SPAN 310, SPAN 311, SPAN 312, SPAN 313, SPAN 314. Survey of Spanish civilization and culture from its origins to the present day.

SPAN 341. Early Literature of Spain. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 304. Readings in Spanish literature from the medieval period to the eighteenth century.

SPAN 342. Modern Literature of Spain. 3 Hours.

PR: Two courses from SPAN 310, SPAN 311, SPAN 312, SPAN 313, SPAN 314. Readings in Spanish literature from the eighteenth century to the present.

SPAN 343. Spanish Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: Two 300-level SPAN courses. Readings in Spanish literature from the medieval period to the present.

SPAN 350. Phonetics and Pronunciation. 3 Hours.

PR: Two of the following: SPAN 310, SPAN 311, SPAN 312, SPAN 313, SPAN 314, or consent. Introduces key concepts and terminology associated with the sound system of Spanish and prepares students to improve their pronunciation.

SPAN 360. Intensive Advanced Spanish in Latin America. 3-6 Hours.

PR: SPAN 204. Development of advanced reading writing, listening, and speaking skills taught on location, as part of a faculty-led program in Latin America.

SPAN 361. Commercial Spanish. 3 Hours.

PR: Two courses from SPAN 310, SPAN 311, SPAN 312, SPAN 313, SPAN 314. Development of advanced speaking, reading, and writing skills appropriate for business contexts within the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 363. The Avant-Garde. 3 Hours.

PR: Three SPAN courses 300 level or above. Examines the Avant-Garde in Spain and Latin America, providing in-depth study of literature, film, art, and other cultural products.

SPAN 370. Advanced Spanish Language in Spain. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 204 or SPAN 200 or score of 494 or higher on placement test. Overview of reading writing, listening and speaking skills taught on location, as part of a faculty-led summer program in Spain.

SPAN 371. Introduction to Spanish Culture in Spain. 3 Hours.

PR: SPAN 204 or SPAN 200 or a score of 494 or higher on placement test. Overview of Spanish culture taught on location as part of the faculty-led summer program in Spain.

SPAN 393A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

SPAN 401. Grammar Review. 3 Hours.

Intensive grammar review for graduate students. (Credit does not count toward 36 hours required for master's degree.).

SPAN 431. Caribbean Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: At least one literature course in Spanish. Readings of selected works by Hispanic writers from the Caribbean region.

SPAN 480. Issues in the Hispanic World. 3 Hours.

PR: Completion of 21 upper division hours in Spanish. An examination of contemporary issues facing the Hispanic world, with particular attention given to cultural developments and influences.

SPAN 481. Hispanic Presence in the World. 3 Hours.

Completion of 21 upper-division hours in Spanish. This course is designed to provide Spanish majors with a capstone experience and offers them a more comprehensive view of the role of Spanish in the world.

SPAN 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

SPAN 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

SPAN 492. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

SPAN 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

SPAN 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

SPAN 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

SPAN 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

SPAN 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.


Faculty

Chair

  • Ángel Tuninetti - Ph.D. (Washington University)
    Latin American Literature and Culture

Associate Chair

  • Susan Braidi - Ph.D. (University of Delaware)
    ESL/Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, and Syntax

Undergraduate Coordinator

  • Pablo Garcia Loaeza - Ph.D. (Indiana University Bloomington)
    Spanish Language, Latin American Colonial Literature

Professors

  • Ahmed Fakhri - Ph.D. ( University of Michigan)
    ESL/Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, Applied Linguistics, Discourse Analysis
  • Daniel Ferreras - Ph.D. (Michigan State University)
    French and Spanish, Comparative Romance Literature, French/Spanish 19th and 20th Century Novel, Theory of the Fantastic
  • Valérie Lastinger - Ph.D. (University of Georgia.)
    French. 18th century French Literature, French Women Writers.
  • Janice Spleth - Ph.D. (Rice University)
    French. Francophone Literature and Culture

Associate Professors

  • María Amores - Ph.D. (Penn State University)
    Spanish, Foreign Language Acquisition
  • Susan Braidi - Ph.D. (University of Delaware)
    ESL/Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, Syntax
  • Cynthia Chalupa - Ph.D. (Ohio State University)
    Fin de siècle German and Austrian Literature, Poetry, Foreign Language Pedagogy
  • Tania de Miguel Magro - Ph.D. (The State University of New York, Stony Brook)
    Spanish Literature and Culture, Spanish Language, Spanish Golden Age Literature
  • Pablo Garcia Loaeza - Ph.D. (Indiana University Bloomington)
    Spanish Language, Latin American Colonial Literature
  • Deborah Janson - Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles)
    German, 18th through 21st Century German Literature, Enlightenment, Romanticism, GDR and post-Wende Literature, Ecofeminism
  • Xiangying Jiang - Ph.D. (Northern Arizona University)
    ESL/linguistics. Second language acquisition
  • Twyla Meding - Ph.D. (University of Virginia)
    French, 16th and 17th Century French Literature
  • Jennifer Orlikoff - Ph.D. (Rutgers University)
    French, 16th, 18th, and 19th Century French Literature, Second Language Acquisition and Methodology, Art History, and Feminist Criticism
  • Sandra Stjepanovic - Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
    Linguistics, Syntax, Psycholinguistics, Semantics
  • Ángel Tuninetti - Ph.D. (Washington University)
    Latin American Literature and Culture. Travel Literature

Assistant Professors

  • Manal AlNatour - Ph.D. (University of Arkansas)
    Arabic Studies, Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies
  • Sandra Dixon - Ph.D. (Brown University)
    Spanish, Portuguese Literature, Spanish-American Literature, Brazilian Literature
  • Lourdes Estrada López - Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
    Spanish Literature and Culture, Spanish Language, Contemporary Spanish Literature, Gender and Sexuality Studies
  • Jonah Katz - Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
    Phonetics, Phonology, Theoretical and Experimental Linguistics, Music Cognition
  • Sergio Robles-Puente - Ph.D. (University of Southern California)
    Spanish Phonetics, Phonology, and Sociolinguistics
  • Elena Shimanskaya - Ph.D. (University of Iowa)
    French, Second Language Acquisition

Professors Emeriti

  • Pablo González - Ph.D. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
    Spanish Literature and Culture
  • Michael Lastinger - Ph.D. (University of Georgia)
    French, 19th Century French Literature, Critical Theory
  • Kathleen McNerney - Ph.D. (University of New Mexico)
    Spanish, Catalan Language and Literature, Spanish Literature and Culture, Women Writers

Teaching Associate Professors

  • Lisa Di Bartolomeo - Ph.D. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
    Russian and Polish Language and Literature, Slavic Folklore, Culture and Cinema, Science Fiction, the Holocaust
  • Hannah Lin - Ph.D. (Ohio State University)
    Chinese Studies
  • Annastella Vester - Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles)
    Italian, Contemporary Italian Literature, 18th and 19th Century Italian

Teaching Assistant Professor

  • Heiko ter Haseborg - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    Education
  • Rafael Osuna Montanez - Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
    Spanish

Instructors

  • Yumiko Adachi - M.A. (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
    Japanese Linguistics
  • Beatrice Malvisi - M.A. (University of Pittsburgh)
    Italian.

Lecturers

  • Daniel Borsay - Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
    Classics
  • Lisa Dunn - M.A. (West Virginia University)
    Spanish
  • Irina Manukova - M.S. (Georgian Politechnial University)
    Russian
  • Robert Tallaksen - M.D. (North Carolina State University)
    Classics