Department of Learning Sciences and Human Development

http://lshd.wvu.edu

The Department of Learning Sciences and Human Develop offers two undergraduate majors: Child Development and Family Studies (CDFS) and Regents Bachelor of Arts (RBA) degree programs. Both of these degree programs have options to flexibly serve students who prefer solely campus-based, solely online, or a blend of both campus-based and online learning opportunities. More information on each of these programs is available by clicking the links to the right.

The undergraduate program in Child Development and Family Studies (CDFS) leads to a Bachelor of Science degree in which students choose from four curriculum options: Birth through 5/Pre-K certification with an endorsement in Pre-K-K special needs, Birth through 5/Pre-K certification, Birth through 5/Pre-K non-certification, or Family and Youth studies. In addition, online options for the Birth through 5/Pre-K certification and Birth through 5/Pre-K non-certification are also available.

The Regents Bachelor of Arts (RBA) is an innovative degree program designed to meet the unique needs of the adult student. Specifically, this program provides students with a comprehensive general education based on individualized skills and learning outcomes. Moreover, eligible students may acquire college credits based on their professional experiences in select subject areas and earned certifications. This option may provide a more cost effective way of completing their education in a timely manner.

For specific information on the following programs please see the links to the right:

  • Child Development and Family Studies
  • Regents Bachelor of Arts

A cumulative college GPA of at least 2.5 is required for admission to the minor. CDFS minors take their courses online through Extended Learning. Minors in CDFS must earn grades of C or better in all courses with the CDFS course designator.

*NOTE: Students may not pursue all 3 of these minors. May only choose 2 from this group:
  • Child Development and Family Studies
  • Family and Youth
  • Infant and Toddler 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT & FAMILY STUDIES MINOR

Minor Code - U081

CDFS 110Families Across the Life Span3
Select two of the following:6
Introduction to Parenting
Infant Development
Early Childhood Development
Select three of the following:9
Child Development Practicum
Adolescent Development
Contemporary Issues in Family Relations
Adolescent Problems and Disorders
Family Interaction and Communication
Child Care Center Administration
Business of Child Care
Best Practices in Pre-K Movement
Total Hours18

Family & Youth Minor

Minor Code - U103

CDFS 110Families Across the Life Span3
CDFS 112Introduction to Marriage and Family3
Select one from the following:
CDFS 210Introduction to Parenting3
CDFS 212Early Childhood Development3
Select three from the following:
CDFS 412Adolescent Development3
CDFS 413Contemporary Issues in Family Relations3
CDFS 414Adolescent Problems and Disorders3
CDFS 415Family Interaction and Communication3
Total Hours 18

Infant & Toddler Minor

Minor Code - U102

CDFS 110Families Across the Life Span3
CDFS 211Infant Development4
Select four from the following:12
Introduction to Parenting
Child Care Center Administration
Best Practices in Pre-K Movement
Infant Toddler Language and Literacy
Early Socio-Emotional Growth
Professional Field Experience
Total Hours19

Certificate in Infant/Toddler Education

Certificate code - cu06

The Infant/Toddler Certificate is a specialized curriculum designed for child care teachers and providers, Head Start teachers and WVU students who want to obtain this specific body of knowledge and who need specific written recognition for their ability to work with young children birth through three years of age. The specific body of knowledge in infancy and the toddler years satisfies new state and federal mandates that teachers of very young children must have formal recognition of their training with infants and toddlers to obtain and/or maintain employment. There are 19 hours in the Infant/Toddler Certificate program. This CDFS certificate incorporates the West Virginia core knowledge and core competencies and the West Virginia Early Standards Framework: Infant/Toddler in order to include the most recent requirements set forth by WV agencies responsible for the birth-three years. The certificate is free standing or can be taken with a degree program.

Required Courses
CDFS 110Families Across the Life Span3
CDFS 211Infant Development4
CDFS 430Best Practices in Pre-K Movement3
CDFS 431Infant Toddler Language and Literacy3
CDFS 432Early Socio-Emotional Growth3
CDFS 491AProfessional Field Experience3
Total Hours19

Certificate in Early Childhood Development

certificate code - cu09

The Early Childhood Development Certificate is a specialized curriculum designed for those who work in Pre-K classrooms in the public school, Head Start and child care centers who must obtain a specific body of knowledge and need specific written recognition for their ability to work with preschool children.

There are 15 credit hours in the Early Childhood Development certificate program. The certificate program is not attached to a degree in Child Development and Family Studies. Credit hours earned in the Early Childhood Development certificate can be applied to degree requirements for those students who want to pursue a degree. This CDFS certificate will incorporate the West Virginia Core Knowledge and Core Competencies and the West Virginia Early Standards Framework: Early Learning Standards in order to include the most recent requirements set forth by WV agencies responsible for preschool children.

Required Courses
CDFS 110Families Across the Life Span3
CDFS 212Early Childhood Development3
CDFS 316Child Development Practicum3
CDFS 430Best Practices in Pre-K Movement3
CDFS 491AProfessional Field Experience3
Total Hours15

Faculty

Chair

  • Reagan Curtis - Ph.D. (University of California, Santa Barbara)

Assistant Chair

  • Amy Root - Ph.D. (University of Maryland)

Professors

  • William Beasley - Ed.D. (University of Georgia)
    Instructional Design, Academic Affairs
  • Reagan Curtis - Ph.D. (University of California, Santa Barbara)
    Learning Sciences, Educational Psychology
  • Gypsy M. Denzine - Ph.D. (University of Northern Colorado)
    Dean, College of Education and Human Services
  • Carol Markstrom - Ph.D. (Utah State University)
    Adolescent Development, Identity and Ethnic Identity Formation, American Indian Adolescents, Involvement in Adult-sponsored Activities
  • Neal Shambaugh - Ph.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)
    Instructional Systems Design
  • M Cecil Smith - Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
    Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education
  • Barbara Warash - Ed.D. (West Virginia University)
    Director of the WVU Nursery School, Childhood Education, Reggio Emilia

Associate professors

  • Terence C. Ahern - Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State University)
    Instructional Design and Technology
  • Ugur Kale - Ph.D. (Indiana University)
    Instructional Design and Technology, Multimedia in Education
  • Kristin Moilanen - Ph.D. (University of Nebraska)
    Adolescent Development, Self Regulation, Risk Behavior, Family Relationships
  • Amy Root - Ph.D. (University of Maryland)
    Child Development and Family Studies (Coordinator); Parenting and the Development of Emotional Competence, Individual Differences, Development of Shy/Wary Behavior
  • Jessica Troilo - Ph.D. (University of Missouri)
    Cultural Conceptions of Fathers, Divorced Fatherhood, Influence of Social Media on Relationships

Assistant professors

  • Sara Anderson - Ph.D. (Tufts University)
    Long term pre-K effects, Pre-K quality among diverse populations, Neighborhood effects, Residential mobility
  • Suzanne Walraff-Hartman - Ph.D. (George Mason University)
    Three to Five-Year Child Development and Learning, Childcare Preschool Environmental Factors, At-risk Child Populations
  • Paul R. Hernandez - Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
    Director, Program Evaluation and Research Center (PERC), Educational Measurement, Evaluation, and Assessment; Academic persistence of underrepresented group in STEM
  • Melissa M. Patchan - Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
    Mechanisms of Peer Assessment of Writing, Effectiveness and Validity of Peer Feedback, Issues of Measurement, Multiple Sources, and Validity of Peer Ratings
  • Karen E. Rambo-Hernandez - Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
    Educational Measurement, Evaluation, and Assessment; Schools and Gifted Learners
  • Jiangmei (May) Yuan - Ph.D. (University of Georgia)
    Learning, Design, and Technology; Formative Assessment, Feedback Design, and Learner Engagement in Online Learning Environments; Robotics in STEM Teacher Education

Teaching Assistant Professors

  • Patricia Haught - Ed.D. (West Virginia Univeristy)
    Learning Strategies, Educational Psychology, Adult Learning and Development
  • Nancy Taylor - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    CDFS Online Major Coordinator; Parenting Education, Conflict and Crisis Management, Family Therapeutic Interventions

Clinical assistant professor

  • Gregory Epps - Ed.D. (West Virginia University)
    Director, Regents Bachelor of Arts program

Clinical instructor

  • Nancy Wolfe-Dilgard - M.A. (West Virginia University)
    CDFS Undergraduate Major and Minor Coordinator; Infants, Toddlers, and Adolescents

Instructors

  • Melissa Workman - M.A. (West Virginia University)
    Early Childhood Education, Early Childhood Teacher, Associate Director of the WVU Nursery School
  • Keri Law - M.A. (West Virginia University)
    Early Childhood Education, Early Childhood Teacher

Professors Emeriti

  • Paul W. DeVore - Ph.D.
  • Carol Markstrom - Ph.D.
  • David L. McCrory - Ph.D.
  • Anne H. Nardi - Ph.D.
  • Edward C. Pytlik - Ph.D.
  • Richard T. Walls - Ph.D.