Intermedia/Photography

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Intermedia/Photography

The intermedia/photography  program at West Virginia University provides an environment that fosters creative exploration and critical inquiry in the production of contemporary art. Through a variety of media explorations, including digital and traditional photographic processes, digital video, animation, installation, interactivity and sound design, students are encouraged to develop unique and compelling forms of expression. A state-of-the-art facility for analog and digital imaging, a diverse and sequenced curriculum, and a supportive and challenging faculty all aid students in their individual journeys as artists. In both our undergraduate and graduate programs, we encourage spirited interaction with the other programs of the College of Creative Arts and the university at large.

In the classroom, frequent critiques of student work become an important activity providing feedback on techniques and subject matter and a chance to discuss project ideas and interpretation. In addition, professional artists are frequently invited as guest lecturers to stimulate dialogue about current issues with the medium. These visiting artists share their experiences so that they may help prepare students for the workplace. Students also learn about the role of the artist beyond the university by attending exhibitions at museums and galleries, and by participating in regular art exhibitions in the community.

Click here to view the Suggested Plan of Study

General Education FOUNDATIONS

Please use this link to view a list of courses that meet each GEF requirement.

NOTE: Some major requirements will fulfill specific GEF requirements. Please see the curriculum requirements listed below for details on which GEFs you will need to select.

General Education Foundations
F1 - Composition & Rhetoric3-6
Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric
and Composition, Rhetoric, and Research
Accelerated Academic Writing
F2A/F2B - Science & Technology4-6
F3 - Math & Quantitative Skills3-4
F4 - Society & Connections3
F5 - Human Inquiry & the Past3
F6 - The Arts & Creativity3
F7 - Global Studies & Diversity3
F8 - Focus (may be satisfied by completion of a minor, double major, or dual degree)9
Total Hours31-37

Please note that not all of the GEF courses are offered at all campuses. Students should consult with their advisor or academic department regarding the GEF course offerings available at their campus.

Degree Requirements

The School of Art and Design values and supports written communication abilities and critical thinking skills developed through iterative writing experiences across the curriculum and within the discipline. To meet this goal students must pass with a C- or better a writing portfolio requirement that includes examples of academic, professional, and reflective writing they have produced in their regular courses. The writing portfolio replaces the Writing Intensive “W” credit for all incoming students beginning Fall 2016. Students graduating Spring or Summer 2016 must complete a “W” course.  Please contact the School of Art and Design undergraduate major advisor, Professor Kristina Olson, for more information. 

A grade of C- or higher must be earned in all ART and ARHS courses.
GEF 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 828
ART 191First-Year Seminar - Creative Arts2
ARHS 120Survey of Art History 1 (may fulfill GEF 6)3
ARHS 160Survey of Art History 2 (may fulfill GEF 8)3
ART 111Drawing 13
ART 112Drawing 23
ART 121Visual Foundations 13
ART 122Visual Foundations 23
ART 211Figure Drawing3
ART 212Multi Media3
Choose one of the following pairs:6
Photography
and Digital Photography
Introduction to Electronic Media 1
and Introduction to Electronic Media 2
Studio Non-Emphasis Courses
Choose two of the following ART 200-level electives:6
Painting 1
Painting 2
Introduction to Graphic Design
Graphic Design 2
Introduction to Sculpture
Sculpture
Printmaking - Intaglio and Relief
Printmaking - Lithography
Ceramics
Ceramics
Life Modeling
If not completed above:
Photography
Digital Photography
Introduction to Electronic Media 1
Introduction to Electronic Media 2
Choose from the following:18
Intermediate Photography
Alternative Photography
Advanced Photography
Intermediate Electronic Media
Interactive Art
ART 470Senior Projects in Intermedia6
or ART 435 Senior Projects in Photography
ARHS 200/300/400 level6
ART or ARHS 200/300/400 level18
Writing Portfolio Requirement *
Electives6
Total Hours120
*

 Please see your advisor for details on this requirement.

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ART 1113ART 1123
ART 1213ART 2123
ARHS 120 (GEF 6)3ARHS 160 (GEF 8)3
ART 191 (University Requirement)2GEF 24
ENGL 101 (GEF 1)3GEF 53
GEF 43 
 17 16
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ART 2113ART 2123
Select one from the following:3Select one from the following:3
  
  
ART 200-level Elective3ART 200-level Elective3
ENGL 102 (GEF 1)3GEF 33
ARHS 200/300/400 level3ARHS 200/300/400 level3
 15 15
Third Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ART 370 or 3336ART 370 or 3326
GEF 73ART or ARHS 200/300/400 level6
Elective3Elective3
 12 15
Fourth Year
FallHoursSpringHours
ART 370 or 3356ART 470 or 4356
ART or ARHS 200/300/400 level6ART or ARHS 200/300/400 level6
GEF 83GEF 83
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120

Major Learning Goals

Intermedia/Photography

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) is a professional degree with an intensive focus on an area of the Arts supported by a program in general studies. The intent of the B.F.A. is to prepare for professional practice in the area of the degree.

  • The ability to think, speak, and write clearly and effectively, and to communicate with precision, cogency and rhetorical force.
  • An informed acquaintance with the mathematical and experimental methods of the physical and biological sciences, and with the main forms of analysis of the historical and quantitative techniques needed for investigating the workings and developments of modern society.
  • An ability to address culture and history from a variety of perspectives.
  • Understanding of, and experience in thinking about, moral and ethical problems.
  • The ability to respect, understand and evaluate work in a variety of disciplines.
  • The capacity to explain and defend views effectively and rationally.

Additional specific goals related to the intermedia emphasis:

  • Knowledge of the concepts related to the visual, spatial, sound, motion, interactive, and temporal elements/features of digital technology and principles for their use in the creation and application of digital media-based work.
  • Understanding of narrative and other information/language structures for organizing content in time-based or interactive media; the ability to organize and represent content structures in ways that are responsive to technological, social, and cultural systems.
  • Understanding of the characteristics and capabilities of various technologies (hardware and software); their appropriateness for particular expressive, functional, and strategic applications; their positions within larger contexts and systems; and their influences on individuals and society. 
  • Knowledge of history, theory, and criticism with respect to such areas as film, video, technology, and digital art and design.
  • Ability to use the above competencies in the creation and development of professional quality digital media productions.

Additional specific goals related to the photography emphasis:

  • Understanding of the visual forms and their aesthetic functions, and basic photographic design principles with attention to such areas as design, color, and lighting.
  • Knowledge and skills in the use of basic tools, techniques, technologies, and processes sufficient to work from concept to finished product. This involves a mastery of the materials, equipment, and processes of the discipline, including but not limited to uses of cameras, film, lighting/digital technologies, processing in black and white, and color, printing, and work with nonsilver materials.
  • Functional knowledge of photographic history and theory, the relationship of photography to the visual disciplines, and its influence on culture. 

ART 102. Non-Major Ceramics. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to teach basic ceramic skills associated with beginning pottery. Emphasis is on throwing techniques, trimming, handle attachment, basic ceramic design, glazing and studio practices.

ART 103. Materials and Procedures. 2,3 Hours.

Designed to guide elementary education majors in developing skills to teach visual arts within the PreK-8 classroom. Using age-appropriate 2-D and 3-D materials and resources students will pursue technical craftsmanship, employ elements and principles of design, and explore art concepts through a series of hands-on activities and projects. Learning relies on engagement with studio art production, lecture/demonstration, teaching labs, readings.

ART 109. Basic Drawing 1 for Non-Majors. 3 Hours.

A beginning-level studio experience emphasizing the application of techniques and materials in rendering. Designed for non-art majors and those seeking to improve their portfolios to gain entrance into the BFA studio program.

ART 110. Basic Drawing 2 for Non Majors. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 109 or consent. A studio experience building upon skills and techniques gained in ART 109. Includes the examination of drawing through expanded materials. For non-art majors, those seeking to improve their portfolios and enter the BFA program.

ART 111. Drawing 1. 3 Hours.

The course emphasizes fundamental principles of drawing with a focus on building basic skills through direct observation, using traditional graphic media and expression.

ART 112. Drawing 2. 3 Hours.

The course emphasizes fundamental principles of drawing with a focus on more expressive approaches to basic problems. Greater emphasis is placed on abstraction and non-traditional drawing processes and media.

ART 121. Visual Foundations 1. 3 Hours.

The course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and concepts of two-dimensional image making with an emphasis on color theory and design. Through creative assignments students develop abilities and visual awareness emphasizing the basics of color perception, form, proportion and rhythm.

ART 122. Visual Foundations 2. 3 Hours.

The course incorporates projects involving abstract and representational ideas in three dimensions and investigates the basic concepts of line, plane, volume, form, mass, texture, composition and time.

ART 191. First-Year Seminar - Creative Arts. 2 Hours.

Based on creating an effective transition to the college and university, students will explore school, college and university programs and policies relevant to academic and artistic success.

ART 211. Figure Drawing. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. This class concentrates on compositional structure from the human figure. Students will investigate organic nature of the figure and its representation in space using a wide variety of media and processes. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 212. Multi Media. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. (May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.) This class expands media possibilities and examines the variables of image-making while establishing personal expression. The course is designed to develop analytical and problem solving skills as well as technical processes.

ART 213. Painting 1. 3 Hours.

PR:ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. The course serves as an introduction to painting with concentration on structure, techniques and imagery. Emphasis is on the development of skills in rendering works which express light, color and form integral to the medium.

ART 214. Painting 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. The course provides the essential structure, techniques and iconography of painting. Its modern development, augmenting the traditional languages of painting, are clarified and isolated.

ART 217. Arts and Cultural Organizations. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the types of non-profit arts and cultural organization and the field of arts administration. Coursework will focus on issues related to the performing and visual arts in the non-profit sector.

ART 223. Introduction to Graphic Design. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. The course emphasizes the application of traditional and technological skills emphasizing color, composition, symbolic drawing, and typography fundamental to the field of graphic design.

ART 224. Graphic Design 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 122. This course emphasizes typography, sequential projects and complex compositions, and includes preparation as well as review of upper-level entrance portfolios.

ART 226. Introduction to Sculpture. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 122 and ART 199. The course focuses on creative expression using basic traditional materials and techniques. Students explore aesthetics and contemporary issues while acquiring a working knowledge of various sculptural media.

ART 227. Sculpture. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 122 and ART 199. New construction techniques including stretched canvas over wood encaustics, molds, plasticene, and figure modeling will aid the students in developing problem-solving skills related to aesthetics and formal sculptural issues.

ART 230. Printmaking - Intaglio and Relief. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. This course is a fundamental printmaking class concerned with creating an understanding and sensitivity towards intaglio processes and techniques. Students explore and develop visual ideas and images using non-traditional approaches.

ART 231. Printmaking - Lithography. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. This course is an introduction to the fundamental processes of lithography with a focus on developing imagery and technical proficiency. Students acquire a working knowledge of the medium while examining aesthetics, contemporary discourse, and history as an art form.

ART 232. Photography. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. The class provides an introduction to the fundamentals of black and white photography. This course covers the tools, materials and principles of the photographic art, focusing on both the technical and visual aspects of the medium.

ART 233. Photo Design. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 224. Emphasis is placed on the use of large and small format cameras, studio photography, darkroom techniques and lighting. Projects are developed to complement the graphic design studio courses by exploring indoor and outdoor assignments.

ART 234. Digital Photography. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 232. This course will explore the fundamentals of photography using digital cameras and Adobe Photoshop software. Emphasis will be placed on processes in the digital darkroom, specialized lighting methods and concept development.

ART 235. Introduction to Silkscreen. 3 Hours.

Printmaking class concerned with creating an understanding and sensitivity towards silkscreen processes, techniques, and developing ideas and images using multiple approaches. Students acquire knowledge of silkscreen, examine its aesthetics, discourse, and history.

ART 240. Ceramics. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 122 and ART 199. The course covers basic ceramic techniques including throwing, trimming, ceramic design, glazing, firing and studio practices. Lectures cover basic ceramic material, information and studio procedures.

ART 241. Ceramics. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 122 and ART 199. The course continues the study of basic ceramic techniques: throwing, trimming, ceramic design glazing, firing and studio practices. Lectures cover basic ceramic material, information and studio procedures.

ART 242. Life Modeling. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 122. Explores entry-level figure modeling including basic bust and small-scale figure modeling. Covers techniques of clay building from armature to plaster or wax castings.

ART 264. Introduction to Art Education. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 105 and ART 106 and ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 122 and six hours of studio. Contemporary art education and resources that support its practices. Students also interact with experienced K-12 art specialists and their various grade levels.

ART 265. Art Education: Elementary. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 264. This course is designed on the discipline-based content and the character of art education at the elementary level. Emphasis is placed on child-centered curriculum development. Course content is based on the WV CSOs and national standards.

ART 266. Art Education: Secondary. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 264. This course is designed on discipline-based content and the character of art education at the secondary level. Emphasis is placed on child-centered curriculum development. Course content is based on the WV CSOs and national standards.

ART 267. Technology Methods in Art Education. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 264. This class examines multiple aspects of classroom technology in arts education. The course combines hands-on computer techniques, critical analysis of digital art, and practical experience with curriculum design.

ART 270. Introduction to Electronic Media 1. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 122. Class provides introduction to fundamentals of digital media. Explores digital photography, animation multimedia. Covers use of various software, focuses on sound, technical foundation and esthetic proficiency in these media.

ART 271. Introduction to Electronic Media 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 270. A continued exploration into applications and aesthetics of digital media. Attention is given to historical and contemporary critical contest for this media. Students encouraged to create hybrids between media and digital approaches.

ART 272. Designing for Multimedia. 3 Hours.

This course explores 2D and 4D visual design in a digital media context. Students learn the foundations of visual design including composition, hierarchy, unity and color theory. These concepts are explored through digital media tools.

ART 273. Beginning 3D Animation. 3 Hours.

Introduction to 3D computer modeling and animation. Fundamental concepts and techniques of polygonal modeling, shading, texturing, lighting, animating and rendering. Character design and bipedal animation. The course culminates with the production an original, character-based group animation.

ART 280. Studio Art for Art Historians. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 120 and ARHS 160. Experiential investigation of art studio practice; guest artist demonstrations. Emphasis on understanding materials, terminology, and artistic processes. May be repeated for credit.

ART 293. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ART 298. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

ART 313. Painting 3. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 213 and ART 214. (May be repeated for a maximum of 36 credit hours.) The course reaffirms and expands formal criteria established in 213 and 214 and directs individual research into personal, historical and contemporary painting issues in oil, acrylic and related media.

ART 315. Arts Administration. 3 Hours.

This course provides a practical approach to understanding arts management in not- for-profit organizations. Topics include facilities management, leadership, programming, audience development, board relations, and fundraising.

ART 316. Arts Programming. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 217. The course examines principles and best practices related to comprehensive arts and cultural programming. Program theory, partnerships, program evaluation, volunteer coordination, marketing, and related topics will be explored.

ART 323. Graphic Design 3. 0-12 Hours.

PR: ART 224. Varied hypothetical projects give students a methodology for solving applied design projects in a range of formats. This class will deal with a combination of computer graphics, book arts, publication design and multi-media projects. Portfolio review. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 324. Graphic Design 4. 1-9 Hours.

PR: ART 323. Senior graphic design studio includes a model studio with real projects, most of which are produced and printed. Emphasis is on developing professional skills in design and design management. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 325. Design for Web and Screen. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 223 and ART 224. Introduction to the technologies and methodologies utilized in graphic design for the web and other screen- based interfaces. This course focuses on an entire design process including information architecture, visual aesthetics and usability.

ART 326. Sculpture. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 226 and ART 227. Students continue to examine personal iconography as it pertains to aspects of contemporary sculpture. Topics explored are concept-oriented, using stone, concrete, glass, and emphasizing craftsmanship and aesthetic issues. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 327. Installation Art. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 122 and ART 199. Students investigate this contemporary art form through a series of temporary, site-specific sculptural environments. Conventional art media and concepts are challenged as students develop alternative solutions to creative problems. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 328. Advanced Typography. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 224. Students will study taxonomy, history and classification of typography as well as create projects in diverse formats such as posters, publications, exhibits or packaging to experience the typographic contexts and etiquette for each.

ART 330. Printmaking. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 230 and ART 231. An exploration of color printmaking, advancing imagery through critical contexts. Students focus on technical mastery in lithography, intaglio, relief and alternative processes, expand their knowledge of printmaking's history and develop creative problem solving skills. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 331. GPS-Jackson Hole Photography Workshop. 3 Hours.

Ten-day intensive photography field course that explores the diverse and remote region of northwestern Wyoming. Course includes daily excursions, darkroom and digital work sessions, gallery visits, and evening presentations.

ART 332. Intermediate Photography. 3,6 Hours.

PR: ART 232 and ART 234. This course expands on the formal and critical criteria established in the introductory courses, and directs creative research into personal, historical, and contemporary issues. Students explore larger format cameras and advanced lighting techniques.

ART 333. Alternative Photography. 3-6 Hours.

PR: ART 232 and ART 234. This course explores alternative photographic techniques and concepts that expand the definition of the medium. Techniques may include hand-applied emulsions, contemporary liquid emulsions, pinhole and plastic cameras, and digital negatives.

ART 335. Advanced Photography. 6 Hours.

PR:ART 332 and ART 333. In this course emphasis will be on furthering explorations in the study of personal expression and development of creative style. Advanced camera, lighting and digital techniques are covered as needed.

ART 340. Ceramics. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 240 and ART 241. This intense studio concentration is designed to prepare students for graduate studies and/or professional studio practices. Historical and contemporary design issues, kiln design and building, firing, glaze and clay formulation, studio practices and advanced-level throwing and hand- building techniques will be studied. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 341. Ceramic Production Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 240 or consent. This course expands the student's experiences in ceramics through the use of industrial techniques, production equipment and business tools for the development, production and marketing of ceramic products.

ART 365. Pre-Student Teaching. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 265 and ART 266. The course concentrates on curriculum development, research methods, and delivery strategies for K-12 art specialists preparing for their professional semester.

ART 370. Intermediate Electronic Media. 3,6 Hours.

PR: ART 270 and ART 271. Students will expand explorations in video production from ART 271 and examine opportunities of creative works on the Internet. Building video skills and methodologies, students will create dynamic and artistic web pages.

ART 371. Interactive Art. 3,6 Hours.

PR: ART 270 and ART 271. Students will utilize skills learned in previous electronic media courses to create projects incorporating a variety of knowledge and interactive software. Attention is given to historical and contemporary critical context.

ART 372. Interactive Design. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 272 and (ART 270 or VISJ 210). Interactive Design is a multimedia studio art course addressing core principles of interactivity, non-linear narration, and interaction design in art and culture.

ART 380. Art and Environment. 3 Hours.

PR: Must pass freshman review and complete 6 hours of 200-level coursework in area of emphasis or consent. Interdisciplinary studio/seminar course investigating art's relationship to the environment through readings, field trips, presentations and studio practice.

ART 393. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ART 413. Senior Projects in Painting. 6 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of ART 313. Advanced study directed toward completion of senior-level projects. Developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition/other exit requirements.

ART 425. Graphic Design: Senior Project. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 324. This course is focused on the development of an undergraduate thesis in which each project is individually defined with an umbrella topic. Formats and content vary but each project culminates in a thesis exhibition and an individual audio/visual presentation. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 426. Senior Projects in Sculpture. 6 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of ART 326 or consent. Advanced study towards completion of senior-level projects, developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition and other exit requirements.

ART 430. Senior Projects in Printmaking. 6 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of ART 330 or consent. Advanced study directed toward completion of senior-level projects. Projects developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition and other exit requirements.

ART 435. Senior Projects in Photography. 6 Hours.

PR: ART 234 and ART 335. Advanced study directed toward completion of senior level projects, developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition.

ART 440. Senior Projects in Ceramics. 6 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of ART 340 or consent. Advanced study towards completion of senior-level projects, developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition and other exit requirements.

ART 444. Promoting the Arts and Culture. 3 Hours.

Provides a framework for effective promotion of non-profit performing arts, visual arts and service organizations in the cultural arts industry. Identifies the tactical side of commercially advancing the arts including effective implementation of arts-field-specific promotional programs and initiatives. Develops an awareness of arts organizations in the current social, cultural, and commercial environments.

ART 470. Senior Projects in Intermedia. 6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Advanced study towards completion of senior-level projects in intermedia. Projects are developed to meet individualized goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition as well as other exit requirements.

ART 472. Advanced Interactive Design. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 272 and ART 372 and JRL 225 and VISJ 322. This course is a semester long, self-directed project focusing on specific interactive design applications in conjunction with advice and consultation from the instructor.

ART 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

ART 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

ART 492. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading and/or research.

ART 493. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ART 494. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

ART 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

ART 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

ART 497. Research. 1-6 Hours.

Independent research projects.

ART 498. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

ART 499. Global Service Learning. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Theory and practice of global service learning. The main objective will be to pair the experiential aspects of meaningful and sustained service in the host community with work from the student's anchor course by offering a methodological framework for cultruarl immersion and community service as well as adding ro the content of the anchor course.