School of Art and Design

http://artanddesign.wvu.edu/

Degrees Offered

  • Bachelor of Arts in Art History
  • Bachelor of Fine Art in Art and Design with majors in Art Education, Ceramics, Graphic Design, Intermedia/Photography, Painting, Printmaking, and Sculpture.

Mission

The mission of the School of Art and Design is to contribute to the greater good of art, education, and culture.

Nature of Program

The School of Art and Design is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.  The curriculum of the School is designed to afford the student an opportunity to explore the visual arts.  Undergraduate programs offer scholarly and studio experiences to potential artists and teachers.  The in-depth instruction is enhanced by the close working relationship between students and faculty, which allows sharing the insights and investigative processes of professional artists and scholars.

Global Positioning Studies (GPS)

Global Positioning Studies (GPS) is an interdisciplinary visual arts initiative within the School of Art and Design.  It positions students at the crossroads between a local sense of place and a global understanding of that place in the world.  Through direct experience, GPS courses encourage students to engage the world as a fertile ground for art making and critical research.  All Art and Design majors are expected to take at least one GPS-designated course to count toward degree requirements.  See course details at:  artanddesign.wvu.edu/gps.

International Study Opportunities

The School of Art and Design has established excellent international educational programs.  These include summer study, short term, and semester-long programs.  The focus of these international programs is with sister institutions in Chile, China and Italy.  Additional opportunities in other countries are also available.  Students should consult with their advisor about taking language courses and other liberal studies courses that would support international studies. See details at: http://artanddesign.wvu.edu/international-programs.

Scholarships

The College of Creative Arts offers scholarships to currently enrolled art and art history majors at all levels and incoming freshmen and transfer students.  The scholarships range from a waiver of tuition for one academic year (fall and spring semesters) to $500 awards and are granted on the basis of academic record and artistic merit as determined by the WVU School of Art and Design faculty (some scholarships also take into account financial need).  All recipients must reapply if they wish to be considered for the following year, unless otherwise indicated in their award letter.  Separate applications for current, incoming and transfer students are available in the School of Art and Design office and at: http://artanddesign.wvu.edu/future-students.  The scholarship review process takes place in the spring semester each year.

Art and Design Endowed Scholarship Resources

School of Art Faculty Award

Drs. Paul & Laura Mesaros Presidential Scholarship

Endowment income shall be used annually or otherwise for student aid in the College of Creative Arts.  Recipients shall a) be regularly enrolled juniors and seniors majoring in the visual arts in the School of Art & Design, b) have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0, c) have passed the annual portfolio review conducted by the faculty of the School of Art & Design, and d) be selected by the Dean of the College in consultation with the WVU Office of Student Financial Aid. 

Drs. Paul & Laura Mesaros Scholarship II

Endowment income shall be used annually or otherwise for student aid in the College of Creative Arts.  Recipients shall a) be regularly enrolled juniors, seniors, or graduates majoring in the visual arts in the School of Art & Design, b) have a minimum GPA of 2.75, c) have passed the annual portfolio review conducted by the faculty of the School of Art & Design, and d) be selected by the Dean of the College in consultation with the WVU Office of Student Financial Aid. 

Bill & Ella Kronquist Memorial Scholarship

Endowment income shall be used annually or otherwise for student aid in the College of Creative Arts. Recipients shall a) be regularly enrolled juniors and seniors majoring in the visual arts in the School of Art & Design, b) have a minimum GPA of 2.75, c) have passed the annual portfolio review conducted by the faculty of the School of Art & Design, and d) be selected by the Dean of the College in consultation with the WVU Office of Student Financial Aid. 

Paul & Elizabeth Mesaros Memorial Scholarship

Endowment income shall be used annually or otherwise for student aid in the College of Creative Arts.  Recipients shall a) be regularly enrolled juniors and seniors majoring in the visual arts in the School of Art & Design, b) have a minimum GPA of 2.75, c) have passed the annual portfolio review conducted by the faculty of the School of Art & Design, and d) be selected by the Dean of the College in consultation with the WVU Office of Student Financial Aid. 

Drs. Paul & Laura Mesaros Memorial Scholarship

Endowment income shall be used annually or otherwise for student aid in the College of Creative Arts.  Recipients shall a) be regularly enrolled students in the School of Art & Design or Music, b) have a minimum GPA of 2.75, c) passed the annual portfolio review conducted by the faculty of the School of Art & Design, and d) be selected by the Dean of the College in consultation with the WVU Office of Student Financial Aid.  First preference shall be given to graduates of Jefferson County, Ohio high schools. 

The School of Art and Design is committed to providing the opportunity and the environment for the best possible education in the visual arts at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  The School’s program of professional education is centered in the studio arts and reinforced with art history and liberal studies.  Students are encouraged to take advantage of the broad range of educational possibilities available at the University and to enroll in courses that support their professional goals and enrich their knowledge.

Admission into Program 

Entrance Portfolio

The School of Art and Design requires a portfolio review for all applicants to the Bachelor of Fine Arts program.  This evaluation is conducted by the art faculty and is designed to ensure that all students entering the studio program have certain basic competencies and skills.  Students are encouraged to apply and complete the portfolio review at the earliest possible date.  Applicants should visit the School website: http://artanddesign.wvu.edu/future-students or phone the office at (304) 293-2552 to receive detailed instructions and portfolio review application material.

Transfer

Transfer applicants in studio art must undergo a portfolio review to gain admittance in the program.  Evaluation for advanced standing or transfer credit in studio subjects is not made solely upon the presentation of a transcript but also depends on the evaluation of a portfolio of artwork.

Advising

The College of Creative Arts requires all art majors to confer each semester with an advisor in order to maintain the correct distribution of coursework and to establish the necessary prerequisites for upper-School instruction.  Students will find it difficult to carry more than three studio art classes in one semester.  Ultimately, it is the student’s responsibility to ensure that all requirements for graduation are met.

Audit, Credit by Examination, Pass/Fail, and Non-Art Major Courses

No studio or art history courses are available on an audit or credit by examination basis.  Students enrolled in the School of Art and Design may not take art classes on a pass/fail basis.  Courses designated for non-art majors may not be substituted for art degree requirements unless approved in advance by the director of the School of Art and Design.

Grade Point Average

A degree candidate in the School of Art and Design must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 (C); admission to the teacher certification program requires a 2.5 GPA.  Students must earn a grade of C or higher in art studio and/or art history and/or art education classes in order for the course to fulfill degree requirements.  In addition, students may be requested to present a portfolio of selected works for examination and evaluation by a faculty committee.  The committee is empowered to make recommendations regarding the student’s status as a major in art and their continuation toward a degree in art.

Student Work

Every effort is made to protect student work and property.  Work displayed in the Mesaros Galleries is insured for the exhibition period.  The School of Art and Design does not accept responsibility for damage or losses under any other circumstances.  The School of Art and Design reserves the right to retain examples of student work for reproduction and exhibition purposes and NASAD accreditation reviews.

Art Supplies

The School of Art and Design orders in advance some necessary supplies for course projects.  Students will also need to purchase materials for individual or specialized projects.

Studio Emphasis Portfolio

Following completion of the Foundation Core, students will be asked to submit a portfolio for review to their chosen area of studio emphasis (ceramics, intermedia/photography, painting, printmaking, or sculpture), normally during the second semester of the sophomore year.  Contact the area coordinator for information regarding the portfolio review.

Graphic Design Portfolio

Following completion of the Foundation Core along with ART 223 Introduction to Graphic Design and ART 224 Graphic Design 2, students wishing to pursue the graphic design emphasis must submit a portfolio for review in the spring, normally during the second semester of the sophomore year. Contact the area coordinator for information regarding the portfolio review for graphic design.

Minors

Art History MINOR

Minor Code - U036

The study of the history of art can enhance comprehension of students’ primary field of study and permit them to achieve a broader and deeper understanding of cultural history. First-hand observation and close study are emphasized. It is intended to help develop skills in critical thinking, written communication, and research. Since the minor in Art History requires a considerable grasp of writing and research, the vocabulary and technical aspects of art historical writing and research are addressed in both the survey and in the upper-level courses. This minor is especially beneficial for those students pursuing careers that demand an understanding of historical and contemporary culture.

Students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5 with a grade of C or better in all required courses.

ARHS 120Survey of Art History 13
ARHS 160Survey of Art History 23
ARHS 240Art Theory3
Upper Division (300 or above) Art History (ARHS) courses 9
Total Hours18

Ceramics Minor

Minor Code - U113

ART 112Drawing 23
ART 122Visual Foundations 23
ART 241Ceramics3
or ART 240 Ceramics
Portfolio Review
ART 340Ceramics9
Total Hours18

Electronic Media Minor

Minor Code - U116

Students in Electronic Media use digital tools and media—computers, the internet, digital cameras, cell phones, and others—to produce artworks such as animation, video and audio productions, interactive art and web-based artworks. Students are exposed to the exciting and rapidly expanding world of multimedia art while learning many valuable skills applicable to today’s job market. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in all minor courses.

ART 112Drawing 23
ART 121Visual Foundations 13
ART 270Introduction to Electronic Media 13
or ART 271 Introduction to Electronic Media 2
ART 370Intermediate Electronic Media3
ART 370Intermediate Electronic Media3
ART 370Intermediate Electronic Media3
Total Hours18

Interactive Design for Media Minor

Minor Code - u129

The interactive media design minor is intended to close an existing gap between the College of Creative Arts and the College of Media by providing a finely-tuned curriculum supplement for journalism and strategic communications students that delivers emergent digital and interactive design skills while expanding learning opportunities for art and design students in the study of narrative methodologies, multimedia and visual storytelling. This minor is restricted to students with a major in either the College of Media or the College of Creative Arts. 

Through collaboration and shared support between the College of Creative Arts and the College of Media, students will be able to acquire critical competitive skills in interactive design and visual narrative using new technologies that will make them highly competitive in an environment that is increasingly determined by digital and visual media. To complete the interactive media design minor, students must schedule an appointment with their advisor in the School of Art and Design or the College of Media.
 
To earn this minor, a minimum grade of C- is required in all minor courses.
 
ART 272Designing for Multimedia3
Art and Design students complete the following JRL course; Media students complete the following ART course:3
Visual Journalism and New Media
Introduction to Electronic Media 1
JRL 225Media Tools & Applications3
300-400 Level courses (9 hours total)
JRL 322Gaming Design and Digital Narrative3
ART 372Interactive Design3
ART 472Advanced Interactive Design3
Total Hours18

Painting Minor

Minor Code - U114

The minor in Painting is designed to introduce students to the foundation of painting media. Traditional and experimental painting in both figurative and abstract imagery is explored. Learning is both one-on-one and collaborative, so that personal exploration and wider aesthetic discourse are heightened. The minor in Painting is designed to introduce students to the foundation of painting media. Traditional and experimental painting in both figurative and abstract imagery is explored. Learning is both one-on-one and collaborative, so that personal exploration and wider aesthetic discourse are heightened.

A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in all minor courses.

ART 112Drawing 23
ART 121Visual Foundations 13
ART 213Painting 13
ART 313Painting 39
Total Hours18

Photography Minor

Minor Code - U115

ART 112Drawing 23
ART 121Visual Foundations 13
ART 232Photography3
Select from the following:9
Intermediate Photography (repeated thre times)
Alternative Photography
and Jackson Hole Photo Workshop *
Total Hours18
*

6 credits required of ART 333 and 3 credits required of ART 331.


Printmaking Minor

In Printmaking, particular attention is given to developing the student’s personal imagery, built upon a solid foundation in traditional and non-traditional processes. This program provides a cohesive offering of courses that focus upon the students’ visual expression through their examination of formal issues, media exploration, relevant histories, contemporary critical discourse, and diverse approaches to problem-solving. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in all minor course.

Minor Code - U118

ART 112Drawing 23
ART 121Visual Foundations 13
ART 230Printmaking - Intaglio and Relief3
or ART 231 Printmaking - Lithography
ART 330Printmaking9
Total Hours18

Sculpture Minor

The Sculpture program curriculum provides a thorough grounding in many different materials and processes and is structured to enhance the student’s ability to solve structural, spatial, formal, and conceptual problems. Wood and metal studios, featuring a wide variety of equipment, allow students to investigate diverse materials and techniques in their exploration of the medium of sculpture. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in all minor courses.

Minor Code - U117

ART 112Drawing 23
ART 122Visual Foundations 23
ART 227Sculpture3
ART 326Sculpture9
Total Hours18

Art History Courses

ARHS 101. Landmarks of World Art. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the study of art history from prehistory to the present in which major landmarks of world art and architecture are considered as aesthetic objects, cultural documents and within their socio-historical contexts.

ARHS 111. World Architecture 1. 3 Hours.

Covers the built environment from cave shelter to Constantine's Rome. Includes architecture of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Considers these periods' influence on modern structures.

ARHS 120. Survey of Art History 1. 3 Hours.

The course examines the history of the visual arts in world cultures from pre-historic periods to the fourteenth century.

ARHS 160. Survey of Art History 2. 3 Hours.

The course examines the history of the visual arts in world cultures from the fourteenth century to the present.

ARHS 181. World Architecture 4: 1850-Present. 3 Hours.

Examination of architecture from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Will consider style, form, technique, material, and meaning in the architecture of the modern and contemporary periods.

ARHS 225. Introduction to Italian Culture. 3 Hours.

Exploration of Italian history, culture, art, design, and language through lecture and experiential learning. Possible field trips: Florence, Rome, Pisa, Sienna, Lucca, Milan. Students conduct an individual design research project.

ARHS 240. Art Theory. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160 and ((ENGL 101 and ENGL 102) or ENGL 103). The course will examine development and tradition of the literature of art theory and its relationship to artistic practice.

ARHS 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled coruses.

ARHS 298A-Z. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

ARHS 304. Asian Art. 3 Hours.

ARHS 307. Native American Visual Culture. 3 Hours.

In-depth overview of the visual material culture of the First Peoples of North America north of the Rio Grande, pre-contact to present. Focus on formal analysis with careful contextual studies.

ARHS 310. Introduction to Curatorial Practices. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. This course provides an introduction to museum structure and specifically the role of the curator. The objective is to assess exhibition display and develop critical perspective on curatorial practice.

ARHS 320. Greek and Roman. 3 Hours.

The arts of the Aegean World, c. 2000 BCE, Greece and Rome to 400 CE are examined. Architecture, sculpture and painting will be included.

ARHS 325. Ancient Roman Art and Architecture. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. A study of a limited number of monuments in two-dimensional and three-dimensional mediums from the first millennium BCE through Imperial Rome.

ARHS 331. Medieval. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. The arts of Europe from c. 312 to c. 1350 are examined. The theoretical, historical, and literary contexts for the images will be established. Architecture, sculpture, painting and portable arts will be included.

ARHS 333. Medieval Architecture. 3 Hours.

The architecture of western Europe and its builders, from 313 through the sixteenth century: monumental buildings, architectural ornament, and the fusion of sacred and secular, in context of medieval world views.

ARHS 338. The History of Stained Glass. 3 Hours.

In-depth introduction to the study of architectural stained glass. Focus on the development of the medium, on formal analysis of composition, on conographical conventions, and historic contexts.

ARHS 345. Modern Art Theory. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160 and 200-level art history. The course will examine the development of modern art theory and its relationship to artistic practice. Emphasis will be placed on the critical and theoretical examination of modernism and post modernism.

ARHS 348. Women in Art. 3 Hours.

The course examines the art of female artists and of women as subjects in art. There will be a historical view along with a strong theoretical component.

ARHS 350. Northern Renaissance. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. The arts of Northern Europe from 1350 to 1560 will be studied in a historical and theoretical context. Painting and sculpture will be the focus of study.

ARHS 354. Italian Renaissance. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. Early Renaissance through Mannerism. The course will emphasize both the historical context and theoretical foundation of 15th and 16th-century Italian art and architecture.

ARHS 360. Baroque. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. The course examines the art of the late 16th through 18th centuries of both Northern and Southern Europe. Issues of historical context and theoretical interpretation are emphasized.

ARHS 370. American. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. This course will treat the arts in the United States from the Colonial era to 1960. Emphasis is placed upon factors which define American art and the critical foundations for the works.

ARHS 375. Nineteenth Century. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. The course focuses upon European and American art from the late 18th century through 1900. Issues of theory, historical context and literary foundation will be considered.

ARHS 380. Modern. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. The revolutionary experience of modern art, from its foundation in 19th-century European movements through the 1950s will be emphasized. Critical theory and historical context stressed.

ARHS 381. Modern Architecture. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. In-depth overview of architecture, 1850 to present. Focus on development of International Style, its dissemination, and challenges to this modernist aesthetic by contemporary architects.

ARHS 382. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright. 3 Hours.

Overview of the life and work of America's most noted and controversial architect. Close examination of his work in the context of the development of modern architecture.

ARHS 385. Print, Propaganda, and Art. 3 Hours.

Survey of the history of printing, printmaking, and other forms of imaging in the western world from earliest printed materials to present. Theoretical implications of image reproduction also considered.

ARHS 388. The Art of Andy Warhol. 3 Hours.

Overview of the ground-breaking and controversial art of Andy Warhol. Close examination of his work in the context of the 1960's Pop Art movement and recent contemporary art.

ARHS 389. Contemporary. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. This course explores the various artistic movements from World War II to the present. Emphasis will be given to the change from modern to postmodern. Familiarity with images and critical texts is expected.

ARHS 393A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ARHS 401. Senior Project-Capstone. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. This class concentrates upon independent research, closely supervised, on a topic of student's selection. This must be well-defined and contain historical, critical, and theoretical issues. (Contractual course.).

ARHS 402. History of Chinese Ceramics. 3 Hours.

Covers pre-history to present with emphasis on historical development of ceramics and cultures of important dynasties in Jingdezhen, China. Students will visit historical archaeological sites, traditional production centers and museums.

ARHS 405. Chinese Language and Culture History. 3 Hours.

Covers basic cultural and written Chinese, an introduction to China's many cultures and customs, and a brief history of China. (Field trips offer experiential learning at sites discussed in class.).

ARHS 406. Graphic Design History. 3 Hours.

PR: ARHS 120 and ARHS 160. This course presents graphic design as visual communication from prehistory to present, traced primarily through the poster. It also includes typography, styles, material culture, attending international political and art movements.

ARHS 445. Michelangelo and His Time. 3 Hours.

ARHS 446. Medieval Painting. 3 Hours.

An historical and media- centered investigation of the pictorial arts of the West c. 800-1300: manuscript illumination, mural painting, panel decoration, embroidery, mosaics, and stained glass.

ARHS 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

ARHS 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

ARHS 492A-Z. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

ARHS 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ARHS 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

ARHS 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

ARHS 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

ARHS 497. Research. 1-6 Hours.

Independent research projects.

ARHS 498A-Z. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

ARHS 499. Global Service Learning. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Theory and practice of global service-learning. The main objective will be to pair the experiential aspects of meaningful and sustained service in the host community with work from the student's anchor course by offering a methodological framework for cultural immersion and community service as well as adding to the content of the anchor course.

Art Courses

ART 102. Non-Major Ceramics. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to teach basic ceramic skills associated with beginning pottery. Emphasis is on throwing techniques, trimming, handle attachment, basic ceramic design, glazing and studio practices.

ART 103. Materials and Procedures. 3 Hours.

The course is designed for elementary education majors, to familiarize the student with two- and three-dimensional media, processes, and concepts.

ART 109. Basic Drawing 1 for Non-Majors. 3 Hours.

A beginning-level studio experience emphasizing the application of techniques and materials in rendering. Designed for non-art majors and those seeking to improve their portfolios to gain entrance into the BFA studio program.

ART 110. Basic Drawing 2 for Non Majors. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 109 or consent. A studio experience building upon skills and techniques gained in ART 109. Includes the examination of drawing through expanded materials. For non-art majors, those seeking to improve their portfolios and enter the BFA program.

ART 111. Drawing 1. 3 Hours.

The course emphasizes fundamental principles of drawing with a focus on building basic skills through direct observation, using traditional graphic media and expression.

ART 112. Drawing 2. 3 Hours.

The course emphasizes fundamental principles of drawing with a focus on more expressive approaches to basic problems. Greater emphasis is placed on abstraction and non-traditional drawing processes and media.

ART 121. Visual Foundations 1. 3 Hours.

The course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and concepts of two-dimensional image making with an emphasis on color theory and design. Through creative assignments students develop abilities and visual awareness emphasizing the basics of color perception, form, proportion and rhythm.

ART 122. Visual Foundations 2. 3 Hours.

The course incorporates projects involving abstract and representational ideas in three dimensions and investigates the basic concepts of line, plane, volume, form, mass, texture, composition and time.

ART 191. First-Year Seminar - Creative Arts. 2 Hours.

Based on creating an effective transition to the college and university, students will explore school, college and university programs and policies relevant to academic and artistic success.

ART 211. Figure Drawing. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. This class concentrates on compositional structure from the human figure. Students will investigate organic nature of the figure and its representation in space using a wide variety of media and processes. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 212. Multi Media. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. (May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.) This class expands media possibilities and examines the variables of image-making while establishing personal expression. The course is designed to develop analytical and problem solving skills as well as technical processes.

ART 213. Painting 1. 3 Hours.

PR:ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. The course serves as an introduction to painting with concentration on structure, techniques and imagery. Emphasis is on the development of skills in rendering works which express light, color and form integral to the medium.

ART 214. Painting 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. The course provides the essential structure, techniques and iconography of painting. Its modern development, augmenting the traditional languages of painting, are clarified and isolated.

ART 217. Arts and Cultural Organizations. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the types of non-profit arts and cultural organization and the field of arts administration. Coursework will focus on issues related to the performing and visual arts in the non-profit sector.

ART 223. Introduction to Graphic Design. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. The course emphasizes the application of traditional and technological skills emphasizing color, composition, symbolic drawing, and typography fundamental to the field of graphic design.

ART 224. Graphic Design 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 122. This course emphasizes typography, sequential projects and complex compositions, and includes preparation as well as review of upper-level entrance portfolios.

ART 226. Introduction to Sculpture. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 122 and ART 199. The course focuses on creative expression using basic traditional materials and techniques. Students explore aesthetics and contemporary issues while acquiring a working knowledge of various sculptural media.

ART 227. Sculpture. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 122 and ART 199. New construction techniques including stretched canvas over wood encaustics, molds, plasticene, and figure modeling will aid the students in developing problem-solving skills related to aesthetics and formal sculptural issues.

ART 230. Printmaking - Intaglio and Relief. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. This course is a fundamental printmaking class concerned with creating an understanding and sensitivity towards intaglio processes and techniques. Students explore and develop visual ideas and images using non-traditional approaches.

ART 231. Printmaking - Lithography. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. This course is an introduction to the fundamental processes of lithography with a focus on developing imagery and technical proficiency. Students acquire a working knowledge of the medium while examining aesthetics, contemporary discourse, and history as an art form.

ART 232. Photography. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 199. The class provides an introduction to the fundamentals of black and white photography. This course covers the tools, materials and principles of the photographic art, focusing on both the technical and visual aspects of the medium.

ART 233. Photo Design. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 224. Emphasis is placed on the use of large and small format cameras, studio photography, darkroom techniques and lighting. Projects are developed to complement the graphic design studio courses by exploring indoor and outdoor assignments.

ART 234. Digital Photography. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 232. This course will explore the fundamentals of photography using digital cameras and Adobe Photoshop software. Emphasis will be placed on processes in the digital darkroom, specialized lighting methods and concept development.

ART 235. Introduction to Silkscreen. 3 Hours.

Printmaking class concerned with creating an understanding and sensitivity towards silkscreen processes, techniques, and developing ideas and images using multiple approaches. Students acquire knowledge of silkscreen, examine its aesthetics, discourse, and history.

ART 240. Ceramics. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 122 and ART 199. The course covers basic ceramic techniques including throwing, trimming, ceramic design, glazing, firing and studio practices. Lectures cover basic ceramic material, information and studio procedures.

ART 241. Ceramics. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 122 and ART 199. The course continues the study of basic ceramic techniques: throwing, trimming, ceramic design glazing, firing and studio practices. Lectures cover basic ceramic material, information and studio procedures.

ART 242. Life Modeling. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 122. Explores entry-level figure modeling including basic bust and small-scale figure modeling. Covers techniques of clay building from armature to plaster or wax castings.

ART 264. Introduction to Art Education. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 105 and ART 106 and ART 111 and ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 122 and six hours of studio. Contemporary art education and resources that support its practices. Students also interact with experienced K-12 art specialists and their various grade levels.

ART 265. Art Education: Elementary. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 264. This course is designed on the discipline-based content and the character of art education at the elementary level. Emphasis is placed on child-centered curriculum development. Course content is based on the WV CSOs and national standards.

ART 266. Art Education: Secondary. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 264. This course is designed on discipline-based content and the character of art education at the secondary level. Emphasis is placed on child-centered curriculum development. Course content is based on the WV CSOs and national standards.

ART 267. Technology Methods in Art Education. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 264. This class examines multiple aspects of classroom technology in arts education. The course combines hands-on computer techniques, critical analysis of digital art, and practical experience with curriculum design.

ART 270. Introduction to Electronic Media 1. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 112 and ART 121 and ART 122. Class provides introduction to fundamentals of digital media. Explores digital photography, animation multimedia. Covers use of various software, focuses on sound, technical foundation and esthetic proficiency in these media.

ART 271. Introduction to Electronic Media 2. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 270. A continued exploration into applications and aesthetics of digital media. Attention is given to historical and contemporary critical contest for this media. Students encouraged to create hybrids between media and digital approaches.

ART 272. Designing for Multimedia. 3 Hours.

This course explores 2D and 4D visual design in a digital media context. Students learn the foundations of visual design including composition, hierarchy, unity and color theory. These concepts are explored through digital media tools.

ART 273. Beginning 3D Animation. 3 Hours.

Introduction to 3D computer modeling and animation. Fundamental concepts and techniques of polygonal modeling, shading, texturing, lighting, animating and rendering. Character design and bipedal animation. The course culminates with the production an original, character-based group animation.

ART 280. Studio Art for Art Historians. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 120 and ARHS 160. Experiential investigation of art studio practice; guest artist demonstrations. Emphasis on understanding materials, terminology, and artistic processes. May be repeated for credit.

ART 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ART 298A-Z. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study, or research.

ART 313. Painting 3. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 213 and ART 214. (May be repeated for a maximum of 36 credit hours.) The course reaffirms and expands formal criteria established in 213 and 214 and directs individual research into personal, historical and contemporary painting issues in oil, acrylic and related media.

ART 315. Arts Administration. 3 Hours.

This course provides a practical approach to understanding arts management in not- for-profit organizations. Topics include facilities management, leadership, programming, audience development, board relations, and fundraising.

ART 316. Arts Programming. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 217. The course examines principles and best practices related to comprehensive arts and cultural programming. Program theory, partnerships, program evaluation, volunteer coordination, marketing, and related topics will be explored.

ART 323. Graphic Design 3. 0-12 Hours.

PR: ART 224. Varied hypothetical projects give students a methodology for solving applied design projects in a range of formats. This class will deal with a combination of computer graphics, book arts, publication design and multi-media projects. Portfolio review. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 324. Graphic Design 4. 1-9 Hours.

PR: ART 323. Senior graphic design studio includes a model studio with real projects, most of which are produced and printed. Emphasis is on developing professional skills in design and design management. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 325. Design for Web and Screen. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 223 and ART 224. Introduction to the technologies and methodologies utilized in graphic design for the web and other screen- based interfaces. This course focuses on an entire design process including information architecture, visual aesthetics and usability.

ART 326. Sculpture. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 226 and ART 227. Students continue to examine personal iconography as it pertains to aspects of contemporary sculpture. Topics explored are concept-oriented, using stone, concrete, glass, and emphasizing craftsmanship and aesthetic issues. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 327. Installation Art. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 122 and ART 199. Students investigate this contemporary art form through a series of temporary, site-specific sculptural environments. Conventional art media and concepts are challenged as students develop alternative solutions to creative problems. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 328. Advanced Typography. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 224. Students will study taxonomy, history and classification of typography as well as create projects in diverse formats such as posters, publications, exhibits or packaging to experience the typographic contexts and etiquette for each.

ART 330. Printmaking. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 230 and ART 231. An exploration of color printmaking, advancing imagery through critical contexts. Students focus on technical mastery in lithography, intaglio, relief and alternative processes, expand their knowledge of printmaking's history and develop creative problem solving skills. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 331. Jackson Hole Photo Workshop. 3 Hours.

Ten-day intensive photography field course that explores the diverse and remote region of northwestern Wyoming. Course includes daily excursions, darkroom and digital work sessions, gallery visits, and evening presentations.

ART 332. Intermediate Photography. 3,6 Hours.

PR: ART 232 and ART 234. This course expands on the formal and critical criteria established in the introductory courses, and directs creative research into personal, historical, and contemporary issues. Students explore larger format cameras and advanced lighting techniques.

ART 333. Alternative Photography. 3-6 Hours.

PR: ART 232 and ART 234. This course explores alternative photographic techniques and concepts that expand the definition of the medium. Techniques may include hand-applied emulsions, contemporary liquid emulsions, pinhole and plastic cameras, and digital negatives.

ART 335. Advanced Photography. 6 Hours.

PR:ART 332 and ART 333. In this course emphasis will be on furthering explorations in the study of personal expression and development of creative style. Advanced camera, lighting and digital techniques are covered as needed.

ART 340. Ceramics. 1-15 Hours.

PR: ART 240 and ART 241. This intense studio concentration is designed to prepare students for graduate studies and/or professional studio practices. Historical and contemporary design issues, kiln design and building, firing, glaze and clay formulation, studio practices and advanced-level throwing and hand- building techniques will be studied. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 341. Ceramic Production Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 240 or consent. This course expands the student's experiences in ceramics through the use of industrial techniques, production equipment and business tools for the development, production and marketing of ceramic products.

ART 365. Pre-Student Teaching. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 265 and ART 266. The course concentrates on curriculum development, research methods, and delivery strategies for K-12 art specialists preparing for their professional semester.

ART 370. Intermediate Electronic Media. 3,6 Hours.

PR: ART 270 and ART 271. Students will expand explorations in video production from ART 271 and examine opportunities of creative works on the Internet. Building video skills and methodologies, students will create dynamic and artistic web pages.

ART 371. Interactive Art. 3,6 Hours.

PR: ART 270 and ART 271. Students will utilize skills learned in previous electronic media courses to create projects incorporating a variety of knowledge and interactive software. Attention is given to historical and contemporary critical context.

ART 372. Interactive Design. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 270 and (ART 272 or VISJ 210). Interactive Design is a multimedia studio art course addressing core principles of interactivity, non-linear narration, and interaction design in art and culture.

ART 380. Art and Environment. 3 Hours.

PR: Must pass freshman review and complete 6 hours of 200-level coursework in area of emphasis or consent. Interdisciplinary studio/seminar course investigating art's relationship to the environment through readings, field trips, presentations and studio practice.

ART 393A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ART 413. Senior Projects in Painting. 6 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of ART 313. Advanced study directed toward completion of senior-level projects. Developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition/other exit requirements.

ART 425. Graphic Design: Senior Project. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 324. This course is focused on the development of an undergraduate thesis in which each project is individually defined with an umbrella topic. Formats and content vary but each project culminates in a thesis exhibition and an individual audio/visual presentation. (May be repeated for credit.).

ART 426. Senior Projects in Sculpture. 6 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of ART 326 or consent. Advanced study towards completion of senior-level projects, developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition and other exit requirements.

ART 430. Senior Projects in Printmaking. 6 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of ART 330 or consent. Advanced study directed toward completion of senior-level projects. Projects developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition and other exit requirements.

ART 435. Senior Projects in Photography. 6 Hours.

PR: ART 234 and ART 335. Advanced study directed toward completion of senior level projects, developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition.

ART 440. Senior Projects in Ceramics. 6 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of ART 340 or consent. Advanced study towards completion of senior-level projects, developed to meet individualized creative goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition and other exit requirements.

ART 470. Senior Projects in Intermedia. 6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Advanced study towards completion of senior-level projects in intermedia. Projects are developed to meet individualized goals. The course culminates with participation in a senior student exhibition as well as other exit requirements.

ART 472. Advanced Interactive Design. 3 Hours.

PR: ART 272 and ART 372 and JRL 225 and VISJ 322. This course is a semester long, self-directed project focusing on specific interactive design applications in conjunction with advice and consultation from the instructor.

ART 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

ART 491A-D. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

ART 492A-Z. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

ART 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ART 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

ART 495A-K. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

ART 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

ART 497. Research. 1-6 Hours.

Independent research projects.

ART 498A-Z. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

ART 499. Global Service Learning. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Theory and practice of global service learning. The main objective will be to pair the experiential aspects of meaningful and sustained service in the host community with work from the student's anchor course by offering a methodological framework for cultruarl immersion and community service as well as adding ro the content of the anchor course.


Faculty

Director

  • Alison Helm - M.F.A. (Syracuse University)
    Sculpture

Associate Director, Undergraduate Advisor

  • Kristina Olson - M.A. (Stony Brook University)
    Art history-Modern and contemporary, Art criticism

Graduate Advisor

  • Joseph Lupo - M.F.A. (University of Georgia)
    Printmaking

Professors

  • Eve Faulkes - M.F.A. (Rhode Island School of Design)
    Graphic design
  • J. Bernard Schultz - Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
    Art history-Italian Renaissance
  • Janet Snyder - Ph.D. (Columbia University)
    Art history-Ancient, Medieval, Northern Renaissance, Native American

Associate Professors

  • Gerald Habarth - M.F.A. (University of South Florida)
    Electronic media
  • Jason Lee - M.F.A. (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
    Sculpture, Foundations
  • Robert Moore - M.F.A. (Utah State University)
    Ceramics
  • Rhonda Reymond - Ph.D. (University of Georgia)
    Art history-American, African American, 17th-19th century European art
  • Shoji Satake - M.F.A. (University of Indiana-Bloomington)
    Ceramics
  • Michael Sherwin - M.F.A. (University of Oregon)
    Photography, Digital imaging
  • Naijun Zhang - M.F.A. (West Virginia University)
    Painting, Drawing

Assistant Professors

  • Dylan Collins - M.F.A. (Kent State University)
    Sculpture, Drawing
  • Joseph Galbreath - M.F.A. (Maryland Institute College of Art)
    Graphic design
  • Terese Giobbia - Ph.D. (Northern Illinois University)
    Art Education
  • Jeffrey Moser - M.F.A. (University of Delaware)
    Interactive Media Design
  • Kofi Opoku - M.F.A. (West Virginia University)
    Graphic design
  • Amy Schissel - M.F.A. (University of Ottawa)
    Painting, Drawing