World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics

http://worldlang.wvu.edu/

Degree Offered

  • Master of Arts, with five possible areas of emphasis

Areas of Emphasis

  • French
  • Spanish
  • Linguistics
  • Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL)
  • Combined Areas

Nature of Program

The M.A. program in World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics offers courses in literature, culture, and literary criticism as well as in theoretical and applied linguistics, and language-teaching methodology. Students also have the opportunity to engage in research projects that reflect their interests within a given subject and that serve to complement and augment the information imparted through in-class activities. The master’s degree is intended for those students who seek more specialized knowledge in order to teach in their chosen area, as well as for students who plan to prepare for doctoral studies or other professional employment.

Available Financial Aid

Graduate teaching assistantships are available for different languages, including Arabic, Chinese, French, German, English as a Second Language, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Portuguese, and Spanish. The assistantships carry full tuition remission and a nine-month stipend (August–May); there are also limited opportunities to teach during the university’s summer session. Assistantships are awarded annually to those students who have demonstrated potential to become effective teachers. In order to be considered for a teaching assistantship, students must fill out the department application and submit a writing sample as well as a recorded sample of their speech in the language they are applying to teach.

In addition to graduate teaching assistantships, a limited number of meritorious tuition waiver awards are sometimes available from the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences through the department. These awards are based on academic performance and financial need.

Graduate Teaching Assistants

The department values the contributions made by our graduate assistants and strives to help them become effective teachers. Graduate assistants normally teach two courses (six class-hours per week). They work under the direct supervision of the course coordinator in the language area, but they are fully responsible for their courses (including evaluating their students’ work). The coordinator will conduct orientations and organizational meetings with graduate assistants and provide course materials (such as syllabi). In addition, the coordinator will periodically observe individual classes in order to assess the graduate assistants’ performance and to provide encouragement and assistance.

All graduate teaching assistants teaching Arabic, French, Italian, and Spanish must register for LANG 621 during their first semester. Graduate assistants teaching any other language must register for LANG 521 in their first semester. In addition, graduate assistants must register for LANG 690 each semester of employment. Students who have already received an M.A. in World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics from West Virginia University may be ineligible for an assistantship in this department.

Additional Points of Information

Advising

All graduate students will have a primary advisor (to be assigned by the chairperson). Students should consult with their advisor when they register for courses or add and/or drop courses. In addition, the Graduate Program Coordinator is available to answer questions regarding the degree program, requirements, comprehensive examinations, graduation, etc. Students may consult with the chairperson regarding departmental matters.

International Students

An F-1 student visa is required for study in the U.S. The visa must be obtained in the student’s home country with an I-20 Form from the WVU Office of Admissions. The I-20 will be sent by the Office of Admissions to the student’s home address once all academic, English proficiency, and financial requirements have been satisfied.

International students studying in the department on an F-l Visa should remember that they are required to carry a minimum course load of nine hours each semester (excluding the summer) in order to maintain their legal status for their visa. International students, who may be forced to withdraw from a course and thus fall below nine hours in any semester, must first check with the department chair and the Office of International Students and Scholars in E. Moore Hall. Exceptions may be possible in the student’s final semester of study.

Study Abroad Opportunities for Graduate Students

Qualified graduate students in French may compete for the Marguerite Eynard McBride Award, which funds an academic year in France. Year-long exchange programs for graduate students are also in place for France and Spain. The department also sponsors study abroad during the summers in Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, Spain, and Taiwan that graduate students may participate in if they meet the program’s requirements. Grants are available on a competitive basis through the department, the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, and through the Office of International Programs to assist students who wish to study abroad.

Admission Requirements

To be admitted to the program, a student is expected to have an undergraduate degree in the desired area of study (or an acceptable related-area) with a GPA of 3.0 (overall as well as within the major). The student must complete the university admission application, including payment of the required fee and completion of the supplemental departmental application form, which requires a 300-word statement of purpose, an extended writing sample in the language of the area to which the student is applying, and three letters of recommendation. International students must also submit an acceptable TOEFL or IELTS score. For more information about the admission requirements and application guidelines, please visit our website.

In this section:

Degree Requirements

Students may select from five areas of emphasis (French, Spanish, Linguistics, TESOL, or a combined area that allows them to combine two areas for their degree) to complete a Master of Arts in World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics. Students must meet all university and college requirements as outlined in the WVU Graduate Catalog as well as the specific departmental requirements described below:

General

  • A minimum of thirty-six credit hours at the graduate level, of which thirty hours of coursework must be taken within the department. (No more than twelve hours of coursework done at the 400 level will be counted toward the degree.)
  • No more than three hours of independent study will apply to the degree (unless approved by the departmental chairperson). Note: Independent studies will be permitted only in special circumstances; in most instances, students must enroll in the regularly-scheduled courses.
  • No more than twelve hours can be transferred to our program from another accredited institution. (In the case of combination concentrations, no more than six hours can be transferred to any of the combined areas, for a total of twelve hours.)
  • No courses for the degree may be taken pass/fail.
  • No more than six hours of thesis credits (697/698) can be applied to the degree.
  • A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. Note: No course for which the grade of D or below is recorded can be counted for graduation credit.
  • Students must satisfy the foreign language requirement.
  • Students must pass comprehensive examinations or successfully defend a thesis.

Foreign Language Requirement

Native speakers of English in TESOL, Linguistics, or a combination of the two, must demonstrate proficiency in a second language prior to graduation by completing one language course of level 204 or above, with a grade of B or better, or by taking the departmental placement examination in one language and placing above the 204-level.

International students whose native language is not English are considered to have satisfied this requirement by virtue of their TOEFL score.

Comprehensive Examinations

The comprehensive examinations are intended to evaluate students’ knowledge, including the ability to synthesize and evaluate ideas in their area of emphasis. The examinations are based on standardized reading lists and coursework. Although many of the works on the reading lists will be included in coursework, independent reading will be necessary. Students must take the comprehensive examinations the semester they intend to graduate.

Thesis

A student may request to write a thesis and prepare an oral defense. The feasibility of writing a thesis may be limited due to faculty availability, the student’s academic performance, or other factors (to see the qualifying requirements for writing a thesis, consult the Graduate Program Handbook). Under this option, the student is not required to take the written comprehensive examinations but may be asked to comment on coursework and the reading lists, particularly as they relate to the thesis. For more information about this option, see the document “Thesis Guidelines.”

French Area of Emphasis

Reasearch and Theoretical Bases6
Methods of Research
Literary Criticism
Knowledge/ Application12
Choose any 4 courses
Early French Literature
Seventeenth Century Literature
Eighteenth Century Literature
Nineteenth Century Literature
Twentieth Century Literature
Francophone Literature
Cultural/Social/Historical Context:3
French Civilization
Contemporary Culture
Language Structures:3
French Stylistics
History of the French Language
Extensions: 12
Thesis Option:
6 hours from the Extension list*
6 hours of FRCH 697 Thesis
Comprehensive Examination Option:
12 hours from the Extension list*
Total Hours36

* For a list of approved courses, see page two of the French Plan of Study

Spanish Area of Emphasis

Research and Theoretical Bases3
Methods of Research
Knowledge/Applications: Spanish Literature9
Contemporary Spanish Literature
Medieval and Golden Age
Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature
Knowledge/Application: Latin American Literature9
Early Spanish-American Literature
19th Century Latin American Literature
20th- and 21st-Century Latin American Literature
Language Structures: 3
Structure of Spanish
Extensions: 12
Thesis Option:
6 hours from the Extension list*
6 hours of SPAN 697 Thesis
Comprehensive Examination Option:
12 hours from the Extension list*
Total Hours36

* For a list of approved courses, see page two of the Spanish Plan of Study

Linguistics Area of Emphasis

Minimum grade of B must be earned in all required courses
Research and Theoretical Bases: 6
Methods of Research
History of Linguistics
Knowledge/Applications: 12
Phonology
Syntax
Advanced Phonology
Advanced Syntax
Cultural/Social/Historical Context: 3
Sociolinguistics
Discourse Analysis
Language Structures: Choose 1 course3
Structure of Modern French
Structure of Spanish
English as a Second Language Linguistics
Language Typology
Language Structures:12
Thesis Option:
6 hours from the Extension list*
6 hours of Ling 697
Comprehensive Examination Option:
12 hours from the Extension list*
Total Hours36

* For a list of approved courses, see page two of the Linguistics Plan of Study

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Area of Emphasis

Research and Theoretical Bases: 6
Methods of Research
English as a Second Language Theory
Knowledge/Application12
English as a Second Language Methods
Second Language Reading
Computer Assisted Language Learning
English as a Second Language Materials and Syllabus Design
Second Language Writing
Language Assessment
Literacy in a Second Language
Applied Linguistics
Discourse Analysis
Cultural/Social/Historical Context: 6
American Culture
An additional approved course
Language Structures: 6
English as a Second Language Linguistics
English as a Second Language Phonetics
Phonology
Extensions: 6
Thesis Option:
6 hours of Lang 697
Comprehensive Examination Option:
6 hours from the Extension list
Total Hours36

* For a list of approved courses, see page two of the TESOL Plan of Study

Combined Areas of Emphases

RESEARCH AND THEORETICAL BASES3
Methods of Research
PRIMARY AREA18
A. Theoretical Bases and Knowledge /Applications: 12 hours
4 courses from the Knowledge and Application list*
B. Cultural/Social/Historical Context : (3 hours)
1 course from the Cultural/Social/Historical list*
C. Language Structures: 3 hours
1 course from the Language Structure list*
SECONDARY AREA15
a. Theoretical Bases and Knowledge/Applications: 9 hours
3 courses from the Theoretical Bases list*
b. Cultural/Social/Historical Context: 3 hours
1 course from the Cultural list*
c. Approved Elective: 3 hours
1 course from the Approved elective list*
Total Hours36

* For a list of approved courses, see page two of the Combination Plan of Study

Major Learning Goals

world languages, literature, and linguistics

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Arabic Courses

Bibliography Courses

BIBY 590. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of bibliography. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

BIBY 591. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

BIBY 592. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

BIBY 593. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

BIBY 594. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

BIBY 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

BIBY 615. Methods of Research. 3 Hours.

BIBY 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of bibliography. Note: This course is intending to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

BIBY 691. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

BIBY 692. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

BIBY 693. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

BIBY 694. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

BIBY 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

BIBY 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

BIBY 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

BIBY 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervison during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

BIBY 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

BIBY 791. Advanced Study. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

BIBY 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

Chinese Courses

Classics Courses

CLAS 590. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of classics. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

CLAS 591. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CLAS 592. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

CLAS 593. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

CLAS 594. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

CLAS 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CLAS 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of classics. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

CLAS 691. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CLAS 692. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

CLAS 693. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selcted from recent developments in the field.

CLAS 694. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

CLAS 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CLAS 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

CLAS 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

CLAS 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

CLAS 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

CLAS 791. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

English as a Second Language Courses

ESL 590. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of English as a Second Language. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on Assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

ESL 591. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ESL 630. American Culture. 3 Hours.

Advanced readings concerning the diversity of American culture with a focus on critical inquiry.

ESL 691. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

ESL 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

Foreign Culture Courses

French Courses

FRCH 501. French Stylistics. 3 Hours.

Development of written communication in French through intense study of French grammar, stylistics, and translation.

FRCH 503. French Stylistics. 3 Hours.

Development of written communication in French through intense study of French grammar, stylistics, and translation.

FRCH 532. Early French Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of French or consent.

FRCH 533. Seventeenth Century Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: 12 hours of French or equivalent.

FRCH 534. Eighteenth Century Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of French or consent. Survey of major literary works of eighteenth century France.

FRCH 535. Nineteenth Century Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: 12 hours of French or equivalent.

FRCH 536. Twentieth Century Literature. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the major tendencies, authors, and works of twentieth century French literature. Analysis of the most representative works of this period and of the cultural and artistic movements to which they belong.

FRCH 538. Francophone Literature. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Readings in French literature from regions outside of metropolitan France, such as Africa, Quebec, and the Caribbean.

FRCH 590. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of French. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

FRCH 591A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

FRCH 591Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 hr. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FRCH 592. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

FRCH 593. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

FRCH 594A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

FRCH 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

FRCH 611. Literary Criticism. 3 Hours.

PR: B.A. in French or consent.

FRCH 635. The Romantic Movement. 3 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of French or consent.

FRCH 636. French Realism. 3 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of French or consent.

FRCH 639. French Women Writers. 3 Hours.

PR: B.A. in French or consent. Selected works of French women writers.

FRCH 647. The Modern Novel to 1930. 3 Hours.

PR: B.A. in French or consent.

FRCH 648. The Novel After 1930. 3 Hours.

PR: B.A. in French or consent.

FRCH 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of French. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

FRCH 691. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FRCH 692. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

FRCH 693. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

FRCH 694A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

FRCH 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

FRCH 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

FRCH 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

FRCH 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

FRCH 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

FRCH 791. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

FRCH 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g. education, community health, geology). These tutition-waived continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.

German Courses

GER 590. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of German. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading may be S/U.).

GER 591. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

GER 592. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

GER 593A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

GER 594A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

GER 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

GER 611. Literary Criticism. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the most important theories within modern literary criticism.

GER 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of German. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading may be S/U.).

GER 691. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR:Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

GER 692. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

GER 693. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

GER 694A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

GER 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

GER 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

GER 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

GER 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

GER 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

GER 791. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

Italian Courses

Japanese Courses

Language Teaching Methods Courses

LANG 521. English as a Second Language Methods. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of teaching English as a second language; techniques and approaches for teaching speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.

LANG 522. Computer Assisted Language Learning. 3 Hours.

Examines CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) methodologies, introduces principles of CALL evaluation, explores current CALL practices in language teaching, develops web-based CALL materials, and reviews CALL research.

LANG 590. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of languages. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading may be P/F.).

LANG 591A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LANG 592. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

LANG 593. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

LANG 594A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

LANG 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

LANG 621. Teaching Foreign Language in College. 3 Hours.

CONC: LANG 690. Methods and techniques of teaching a foreign language at the college level.

LANG 622. English as a Second Language Theory. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 101 or LING 311. Explores factors and processes involved in the acquisition of English as a second language and their implications for classroom instruction.

LANG 623. English as a Second Language Materials and Syllabus Design. 3 Hours.

PR: LANG 521. Theory and design of syllabi and materials applied to diverse ESL & EFL teaching situations. Students produce and evaluate all aspects of integrated instructional units.

LANG 624. Second Language Writing. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 101 or equivalent. A study of how adults learn to write in a second language and how to help them improve their writing.

LANG 625. Language Assessment. 3 Hours.

Introduces fundamental principles of language testing and helps students develop skills in test development, item analysis, interpretation of test results.

LANG 626. Literacy in a Second Language. 3 Hours.

Reviews theoretical perspectives on reading and literacy development and explores research studies that cover different areas in second language reading and literacy (biliteracy).

LANG 690A-K. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of Languages. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading may be P/F.).

LANG 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LANG 692. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

LANG 693A. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

LANG 694A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

LANG 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

LANG 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

LANG 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

LANG 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

LANG 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

LANG 791. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LANG 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional Development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology). These tuition-waived continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.

Linguistics Courses

LING 501. Structure of Spanish. 3 Hours.

Description of phonological or grammatical systems of Spanish, with emphasis on contrastive analysis (Spanish/English) and applied linguistics.

LING 511. English as a Second Language Linguistics. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 101 or LING 301. Analysis of English structure for the purpose of teaching it to non-native speakers. Includes identification of problematic aspects and procedures for teaching them effectively.

LING 512. Applied Linguistics. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 311 and prior second language study. Study of the application of linguistic analysis in the areas of language acquisition, instruction, and use.

LING 513. History of Linguistics. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 311 or Consent. Development of linguistics from Greeks and Romans to contemporary researchers with concentration on major linguists and schools of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

LING 514. Sociolinguistics. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 101 or LING 311. Linguistic study of geographical and social variation in languages; effects of regional background, social class, ethnic group, sex, and setting; outcomes of conflict between dialect and between languages.

LING 516. Discourse Analysis. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 101 or equivalent. A study of the structural properties of spoken and written texts and how they are related to the contextual factors involved in text production.

LING 590. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of linguistics. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading may be P/F.).

LING 591A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LING 592. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

LING 593A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

LING 594A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

LING 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

LING 601. History of the Spanish Language. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 311 and 18 hours of Spanish or consent. Evolution of Castilian from Vulgar Latin to its modern standard form through a study of historical phonology, morphology, and syntax, together with the external factors which influenced the development of the language.

LING 603. History of the French Language. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 311 and 18 hours of French or consent. Evolution of French from Vulgar Latin into the Modern French standard through a study of historical phonology, morphology, and syntax, together with the external factors which influenced the development of the language.

LING 605. History of the German Language. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 311 and 18 hours of German or Consent. Historical development of standard German languages and dialects.

LING 611. Advanced Phonology. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 411. The form of phonological rules and their organization within a grammar, the structure of phonological representations, and the role of language universals in models of language acquisition.

LING 612. Advanced Syntax. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 412 or Consent. Examination and discussion of theoretical issues in generative-transformational syntax. Focus on specific proposals advanced within the framework of Government- Binding Theory.

LING 613. English as a Second Language Phonetics. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 311. Analysis of American English phonetics including sound segments, stress, rhythm, intonation, and positional variants. Techniques and practice offered for teaching pronunciation to non-native speakers.

LING 614. Psycholinguistics. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 311 or Consent. Provides an insight into the many areas of psycholinguistics study, including language acquisition, sentence processing, animal communication, dichotic listening, aphasia, and semantics.

LING 615. Language Change and Reconstruction. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 311 or equivalent. Exploration of the mechanisms of language change, theories of diachronic linguistics, and techniques for reconstructing unattested languages; concentration on the Indo-European family and its history.

LING 616. Language Typology. 3 Hours.

PR: LING 101 or LING 311 or equivalent. Study of the uniformity and diversity of the world's languages. Which characteristics of human languages are universal and which are subject to cross- linguistic variation. An overview of the main results and methodology of typological research.

LING 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of linguistics. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

LING 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

LING 692. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

LING 693A. Special Topics. 1,6 Hour.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

LING 694A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

LING 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

LING 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

LING 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

LING 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

LING 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

LING 791. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

Portugese Courses

Russian Courses

RUSS 591. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RUSS 691. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RUSS 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

Spanish Courses

SPAN 590. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of Spanish. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

SPAN 591A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

SPAN 592. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

SPAN 593A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contempory topics seleceted from recent developments in the field.

SPAN 594A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

SPAN 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

SPAN 611. Literary Criticism. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the main tendencies of contemporary literary theory as applied to Spanish literature; literary theory and practice. Review and evaluation of the main critical approaches from a practical standpoint.

SPAN 630. Latin American Culture. 3 Hours.

A study of history, culture, politics, economics, and development of the Latin American continent.

SPAN 631. Latin American Short Story. 3 Hours.

SPAN 632. Latin American Novel to 1960. 3 Hours.

SPAN 633. Latin American Novel Since 1960. 3 Hours.

SPAN 634. Latin American Poetry. 3 Hours.

SPAN 635. Latin American Theatre. 3 Hours.

SPAN 637. Early Spanish-American Literature. 3 Hours.

In depth readings in Spanish-American literature of the colonial period in their historical context.

SPAN 638. Mexican Literature. 3 Hours.

In-depth readings of literary works from Mexico.

SPAN 639. Gaucho Culture and Literature. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of the culture and literature of the Gaucho in the historical and political context of Argentina and Uruguay. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 640. 19th Century Latin American Literature. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of the main literary works and movements in Latin America from Neoclassicism to Modernism. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 641. 20th- and 21st-Century Latin American Literature. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of the main literary works and movements in Latin America from early 20th century to the present. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 643. Contemporary Spanish Literature. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the major tendencies, authors, and works of Spanish Peninsular Literature from the late 19th Century to nowadays; presentation and analysis of the main literary movements of the period.

SPAN 650. Spanish Civilization. 3 Hours.

Diachronic study of Spanish civilization with particular attention to literary and artistic movements and their relation to the socio-political sphere. (Course taught in Spanish.).

SPAN 651. Medieval and Golden Age. 3 Hours.

In-depth reading in Spanish literature of the Middle Ages Renaissance, and Baroque periods, in narrative, drama, and poetry, within its historical context. Non-canonical works will also be included and studied.

SPAN 652. Cervantes. 3 Hours.

PR: 24 hours of Spanish or consent.

SPAN 653. Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the major tendencies, authors, and works of the 18th and 19th Centuries Spanish Peninsular Literature; presentation and analysis of the main literary movements of the period, from the Enlightenment to Naturalism.

SPAN 654. Spanish Literature 1898-1936. 3 Hours.

Survey of the major trends and representative authors and works of the Modernist period in Spain.

SPAN 655. Spanish Literature 1936-1975. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of Spanish literature published between 1936, the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, and 1975, the end of the Franco dictatorship. Focus on all genres and their historical context.

SPAN 656. Spanish Literature after 1975. 3 Hours.

Survey of the major trends and representative authors and works of Spanish literature since the end of the Franco dictatorship.

SPAN 657. La Vanguardia. 3 Hours.

This course examines the Avant-Garde in Spain and Latin America, providing in-depth study of this transatlantic cultural movement.

SPAN 671. Latin American Women Writers. 3 Hours.

SPAN 672. Spanish Women Writers. 3 Hours.

SPAN 673. Hispanic Literature and Film. 3 Hours.

SPAN 674. Afrohispanic Literature. 3 Hours.

The reading, discussion, and analysis of literature written by Hispanic authors of African descent.

SPAN 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of Spanish. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

SPAN 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

SPAN 692A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

SPAN 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

SPAN 694A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

SPAN 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

SPAN 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

SPAN 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

SPAN 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

SPAN 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

SPAN 791. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

SPAN 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewl or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g. education, community health, geology). These tution waived continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.


Faculty

Chair

  • Ángel T. Tuninetti - Ph.D. (Washington University)
    Latin American Literature and Culture

Associate Chair

  • Susan Braidi - Ph.D. (University of Delaware)
    ESL/Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, Syntax

Graduate Coordinator

  • Sandra Stjepanovic - Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
    Linguistics, Syntax, Psycholinguistics

Professors Emeriti

  • Pablo González - Ph.D. (University Complutense de Madrid)
    Spanish American Literature and Culture
  • Kathleen McNerney - Ph.D. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico)
    Spanish, Catalan Language and Literature, Spanish Literature and Culture, Women Writers

Professors

  • Ahmed Fakhri - Ph.D. (University of Michigan)
    ESL/Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, Applied Linguistics, Discourse Analysis
  • Daniel Ferreras - Ph.D. (Michigan State Univesrity)
    French and Spanish, Comparative Romance Literature, French/Spanish 19th and 20th Century Novel, Theory of the Fantastic
  • Valérie Lastinger - Ph.D. (University of Georgia)
    French, 18th-century French Literature, French Women Writers
  • Janice Spleth - Ph.D. (Rice University)
    French and Francophone Literature and Culture

Associate Professors

  • María Amores - Ph.D. (Pennyslavania State University)
    Spanish, Foreign Language Acquisition
  • Susan Braidi - Ph.D. (University of Delaware)
    ESL/Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, Syntax
  • Cynthia Chalupa - Ph.D. (Ohio State University)
    Fin de Siècle German and Austrian Literature, Poetry, Foreign Language Pedagogy
  • Tania de Miguel Magro - Ph.D. (The State University of New York, Stony Brook)
    Spanish Literature and Culture, Spanish Language, Spanish Golden Age Literature
  • Pablo Garcia Loaeza - Ph.D. (Indiana University Bloomington)
    Spanish Language, Latin American Colonial Literature
  • Deborah Janson - Ph.D. (University of California)
    German, 18th-21st-century German Literature, Enlightenment, Romanticism, GDR and Post-Wende Literature, Ecofeminism
  • Xiangying Jiang - Ph.D. (Northern Arizona University)
    ESL/Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition
  • Twyla Meding - Ph.D. (University of Virginia)
    French, 16th and 17th-century French Literature, The Pastoral Novel
  • Sandra Stjepanovic - Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
    Linguistics, Syntax, Psycholinguistics, Semantics
  • Ángel T. Tuninetti - Ph.D. (Washington University)
    Chairperson, Spanish, Spanish-American Literature and Culture, Travel Literature

Assistant Professors

  • Manal AlNatour - Ph.D. (University of Arkansas)
    Arabic Studies, Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies
  • Sandra Dixon - Ph.D. (Brown University)
    Spanish, Spanish American Literature, Brazilian Literature
  • Lourdes Estrada López - Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
    Spanish Literature and Culture, Spanish Language, Contemporary Spanish Literature, Gender and Sexuality Studies
  • Jonah Katz - Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institue of Technology)
    Phonetics, Phonology, Theoretocal and Experimental Linguistics, Music Cognition
  • Sergio Robles-Puente - Ph.D. (University of Southern California)
    Spanish Phonetics, Phonology, and Sociolinguistics

Teaching Associate Professor

  • Lisa Di Bartolomeo - Ph.D. (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill)
    Russian, Russian and Polish Language and Literature, Slavic Folklore, Culture and Cinema, Science Fiction, the Holocaust
  • Hannah Lin - Ph.D. (Ohio State University)
    Chinese Studies
  • Jennifer Orlikoff - Ph.D. (Rutgers University)
    French, 16th, 18th, 19th Century French Literature, Second Language Acquisition and Methodology, Art History, and Feminist Criticism
  • Annastella Vester - Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles)
    Italian, Contemporary Italian Literature, 18th and 19th-century Italian

Teaching Assistant Professor

  • Wenyang Zhai - Ph.D. (Florida State University)
    Chinese Literature and Cinema, Diaspora Literature Studies and Cultural Studies