Design and Merchandising

Degree Offered

  • Master of Science in Design and Merchandising

The objective of this program is to raise each student’s ability to apply fully developed design thinking, mastery of merchandising systems, and deep understanding of selected contexts to applications in targeted areas. These areas currently include cultural resource management/historic preservation, healthcare design, integrated marketing communications, and sustainable design practices. Areas of focus may be expanded, however, to meet student demands if resources and faculty expertise is available.

A candidate for the M.S. degree in Design and Merchandising must meet all University, College, Division, and Program requirements as outlined in the WVU Graduate Catalog.

Program Requirements

All M.S. degree candidates are required to follow a planned program of study. The student develops the plan of study during their first year in the program in conjunction with the graduate committee. The plan must be approved by the Director of the Division and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the Davis College.

A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required in all courses applied toward degree requirements.
Course Requirements as determined by the Plan of Study *30
Total Hours30
*

Students must complete a minimum of 30 total hours, of which at least 24 hours must be coursework other than research, thesis, project, internship, etc. credits.

Major Learning Goals

design and merchandising

Graduates will be able to:

  • Conduct research appropriate to their cognate specialty and process (design & merchandising) focus.
  • Teach at a post-secondary level within their discipline.
  • Apply systemic design thinking to industry innovation at advanced levels.
  • Apply iterative design process to solve real world problems.
  • Analyze user wants and needs at both micro and macro levels.
  • Utilize advanced technology where appropriate.
  • Place the right product at the right price in the right place at the right time.
  • Communicate effectively.

Design Studies Courses

Design and Merchandising Courses

DSM 535. Visual 3D Modeling and Rendering. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Develops students' abilities to apply digital three- dimensional instruments and techniques to effectively visualize and communicate the physical characteristics and phenomenal effects of existing and projected physical artifacts.

DSM 550. Precision Drawing and Modeling. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Develops student's working knowledge of the opportunities and constraints associated with using advanced digital representational instruments for precise design, visualization and construction of architectural environments.

DSM 593A-G. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of comtemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

DSM 620. Creativity, Innovation, and Design. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the main concepts of creativity and innovation as related to design through experiential learning and theory evaluation.

DSM 650. The Creative Economies. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Provides theoretical underpinnings of the emerging creative economies and introduces analytical frameworks and models to evaluate the impact of creative industries and activities on sustainable economic development at community and regional levels.

DSM 673A-Z. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

DSM 684. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of agriculture, forestry, and consumer sciences. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

DSM 689. Research Methods in Family Resources. 3 Hours.

PR: Introductory statistics or written consent. Research methodology, experimental design, and statistical analysis as relevant to problems in family resources.

DSM 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of agriculture, forestry, and consumer sciences. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

DSM 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

DSM 692A. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

DSM 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

DSM 694A-C. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

DSM 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

DSM 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

DSM 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

DSM 699. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

DSM 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology). These tuition-waived continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.