Educational Psychology

http://lshd.wvu.edu/edp

Degrees Offered

  • Graduate Certificate in Health Professions Education 
    • Master of Arts in Educational Psychology (EdP)
          Areas of Emphasis in:
               Educational Psychology
               Evaluation and Research
               Child Development and Family Studies
  • Doctor of Education in Educational Psychology (EdP)

General Description

The Educational Psychology Program in the College of Education and Human Services offers opportunities for graduate study and research leading to a Graduate Certificate in Health Professions Education, a Master of Arts (MA) degree with one of three areas of emphasis (General Educational Psychology, Program Evaluation and Research, or Child Development and Family Studies), and a doctoral degree. We also contribute to college-wide PhD in Education emphases in a) Learning, Instructional Design, and Technology and b) Human Development and Family Studies (see http://cehs.wvu.edu/grad/doc/phd-education).

Certificate in Health Professions Education (HPE)

The Certificate in Health Professions Education is designed for health professionals who are (1) looking to move into a new career as health care educators, (2) who may desire educational knowledge and skills in their present fields, and (3) for those who are in or are preparing for educational leadership positions, but may lack formal training in education. This program will provide a foundation in the theory and practice of curriculum design, instruction, student performance assessment, program evaluation, education leadership and management, and educational scholarship.

The Certificate in Health Professions Education (HPE) is a joint offering from the School of Medicine (SoM) in the Health Science Center and the Educational Psychology program in the College of Education and Human Services (CEHS). The program consists of completing an online orientation module before taking any courses, developing a professional development plan, and completing four courses in Educational Psychology, one of which requires a capstone project where an educational plan is developed for a health care setting.

Master of Arts in Educational Psychology

The principal goal of the Master of Arts in Educational Psychology is the education and training of professionals who will serve teaching and learning environments with responsibilities related to instruction, service, and research. Graduates are well prepared to continue their education and professional development in relevant doctoral programs or to take positions in: educational agencies at local, state, and federal levels; public and private human service centers; medical centers; business and industry; and other settings.

Completion of the program develops competencies related to learning, development, instruction, and program evaluation and research. Professional preparation focuses on one of the following three areas of emphasis: General Educational Psychology, Program Evaluation and Research, or Child Development and Family Studies.

General Educational Psychology. The General Educational Psychology area of emphasis is designed for individuals who want to pursue general preparation in learning, development, measurement, and research with the flexibility of selecting individualized additional coursework that supports their professional development goals. All students in this area of emphasis complete four core courses, additional electives, and are required to design and conduct either 1) a project that solves a practical problem in learning or development or 2) a research thesis that investigates a topic of relevance to learning or development.

Evaluation and Research. The Evaluation and Research area of emphasis is designed for individuals with interest in conducting research and evaluation projects for private and public educational organizations and agencies. All students in this area of emphasis complete six core courses in research and evaluation methodology, additional electives, and are required to design and conduct at least one full program evaluation during the course of their studies.

Child Development and Family Studies. The Child Development and Family Studies (CDFS) area of emphasis provides students with opportunities for conducting research and working with families and children in educational, applied, or other clinical settings. Courses in child development, family studies, parenting strategies, and interpersonal communication skills are supplemented with field experiences in a variety of settings. Individuals studying Child Development and Family Studies may select a professional focus from a wide variety of areas including child care specialist, early childhood teacher, developmental specialist, child life educator, parent educator, extension specialist, and family life specialist.

Doctoral Program in Educational Psychology (not currently admitting new students as new PhD in Learning Sciences and Human Development is being developed)

The Educational Psychology program in the College of Education and Human Services offers opportunities for graduate study and research leading to the Doctor of Education. The Learning Goals for the Ed.D. in Educational Psychology seek to educate and train professionals who will focus on teaching and learning environments as they carry out their missions in instruction, service, and research. The principal goal of the program is the education and training of professionals who will focus on teaching and learning environments as they carry out their missions associated with instruction, service, and research. Professional preparation centers on (a) learning and development; (b) instructional development; and (c) measurement, research, and statistics. Accordingly, students are expected to achieve competencies in these areas. The student, the student’s adviser, and the student's committee jointly plan programs to meet particular career needs. Minor fields of study are also planned for each student as appropriate. In addition to the general requirements of the University and the College of Education and Human Services, there is a core of courses supporting the development of competencies required of all graduate students in the program.

Admissions for Graduate Certificate in Health Professions Education

Students can apply to the program online at http://graduateadmissions.wvu.edu/how-to-apply as a non-degree student (CEHS 4597 – Non-Degree Certificate). Students enrolled in a WVU degree program may also apply for the certificate program, but should be aware that no more than 6 credits earned toward the certificate may be applied to another degree (and vice versa). To be admitted as a non--‐degree student, a student must present evidence of a baccalaureate degree. The student must also maintain a 3.00 grade point average for the 12 credit hours of course work, a CEHS requirement. This average must be maintained as long as the student is enrolled. 

Admissions for Educational Psychology Master of Arts

All Educational Psychology masters require the same admissions materials and follow similar processes to make admissions decisions. All faculty members affiliated with the program evaluate the credentials submitted for all completed applications. A majority must indicate acceptance and at least one faculty member must be willing to serve as the student’s adviser. Final approval for admission rests with the relevant Program Coordinator.

In line with best practices for evaluation and assessment, set cutoff scores for tests and GPA are not used to make unidimensional admissions decisions. Instead, applicant materials are reviewed as a total package and admissions decisions are based on multidimensional factors. That said, successful applicants tend to be at or above the 50th percentile on the GRE or MAT, have undergraduate GPAs at or above 3.0, and graduate GPAs (if any) at or above 3.25.

Applicants interested in being considered for admission to the Educational Psychology MA graduate program should indicate that interest on standard online application forms provided by the West Virginia University Office of Admissions and Records, which can be found here: http://graduateadmissions.wvu.edu/how-to-apply

In addition to the completed online application form, the following items must be sent to the appropriate Administrative Assistant (see below) before the admission process can be initiated:

  1. A completed WVU online graduate application: http://graduateadmissions.wvu.edu/how-to-apply
  2. The applicant's undergraduate and graduate (if any) transcript(s)
  3. An official copy of the results of either the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test (GRE/MAT may be waived for General Educational Psychology and Evaluation and Research majors, but is required for Child Development and Family Studies majors) and for non-native English speakers an official copy the TOEFL showing a score of 79 or above (no conditional admissions will be considered)
  4. Three (3) letters of recommendation
  5. A personal vita (resume)
  6. A written statement of approximately 500 words, indicating the applicant's fit for the specific major they wish to be admitted to and goals relative to receiving a graduate degree in Educational Psychology. This statement should indicate which faculty members in the program have research or teaching interests that align with the student's own interests and therefore might appropriately mentor the student if admitted to the program. 

Review of applicants for admission will not begin until after all items 1-6 listed above have been received by the relevant administrative assistant.

Admission materials should be uploaded to the WVU online graduate application. For answers to questions regarding application materials please contact the appropriate administrative assistant:

General Educational Psychology area of emphasis or Evaluation and Research area of emphasis contact:   Dana Musick (dmusick2@mail.wvu.edu) c/o The Department of Learning Sciences and Human Development, West Virginia University, PO Box 6122, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6122

Child Development and Family Studies area of emphasis contact:   Judy Martin (Judy.Martin@mail.wvu.edu) c/o The Department of Learning Sciences and Human Development, West Virginia University, PO Box 6122, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6122

Graduate Certificate in Health Professions Education

"Orientation to HPE" Module - To be completed before or during first semester
Professional Development Plan - To be posted on the Health Sciences program portfolio site during the first course
HPE Core Content
Must maintain a 3.0 GPA for all coursework
EDP 600Educational Psychology3
EDP 612Introduction to Research3
EDP 617Program Evaluation3
EDP 640Instructional Design3
Total Hours12

PROGRAM FEATURES FOR GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION.

The Certificate in Health Professions Education consists of the following major features: (1) Required online orientation module: This online “Orientation to HPE” module provides an overview of the Certificate program, opportunities in the HPE field, and educational/medical education terminology. This module, housed on Health Science’s SOLE platform, must be completed before or during the semester in which the first course is taken. (2) Professional Development Plan: This written document helps to identify a student’s HPE career interests and goals, learning products developed through each course, and how each product meets the student’s career goals. (3) 4 three-credit hour courses from CEHS: Educational Psychology (see table above). (4) Capstone experience: An educational plan and program evaluation plan to address a health care need is developed in EDP 617, Program Evaluation.

Master of Arts

Major Requirements

EDP 612Introduction to Research3
EDP 613Statistical Methods 13
Thesis
Area of Emphasis24-27
Total Hours30-33

Educational Psychology Area of Emphasis

Major Requirements
EDP 600Educational Psychology3
EDP 611Measurement/Evaluation in Educational Psychology3
EDP 698Thesis or Dissertation3-6
Additional Courses/ Electives 12-15
Total Hours30-33

 Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
EDP 6003EDP 6113EDP 6403
EDP 6123EDP 6133Elective3
Elective3Elective3 
 9 9 6
Second Year
FallHours  
EDP 6983-6  
Elective3  
 6-9
Total credit hours: 30-33

Evaluation and Research Area of Emphasis

Major Requirements
EDP 611Measurement/Evaluation in Educational Psychology3
EDP 612Introduction to Research3
EDP 613Statistical Methods 13
EDP 617Program Evaluation3
EDP 618Mixing Research Methodologies3
EDP 685Practicum3
EDP 698Thesis or Dissertation3
SCFD 615Qualitative Research Methods3
SCFD 781Nature of Inquiry 11
SCFD 782Nature of Inquiry 21
SCFD 783Nature of Inquiry 31
Electives3
Educational Psychology
Statistical Methods 2
Instructional Design
Practicum
Multivariate Methods 1
Total Hours30

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHoursSummerHours
EDP 6123EDP 6113EDP 6183
EDP 6133EDP 6173EDP 6853
SCFD 6153EDP 6853 
SCFD 7811SCFD 7821 
 10 10 6
Second Year
FallHours  
EDP 6983  
SCFD 7831  
 4
Total credit hours: 30

Child Development and Family Studies Area of Emphasis

CDFS 698Thesis or Dissertation6
Content Component:
CDFS 640Survey of Family Studies3
CDFS 645Socio-Emotional Development of Children3
CDFS 647Comparative Study of Family3
CDFS 648Theories of Child and Adolescent Development3
CDFS 649Socialization Processes3
Electives6
Total Hours27

Suggested Plan of Study

First Year
FallHoursSpringHours
EDP 6123EDP 6133
CDFS 6403CDFS 6493
CDFS 6483Elective3
 9 9
Second Year
FallHoursSpringHours
CDFS 6473CDFS 6453
CDFS 6983CDFS 6983
Elective3 
 9 6
Total credit hours: 33

Doctor of Education

A program of study consists of a minimum of seventy-two hours of graduate credit beyond a bachelor's degree or forty-two hours beyond a master's degree (not including dissertation credits).  In addition, successful completion of the competency requirements in the areas of (a) learning and development, (b) instruction, and (c) research are mandatory before a student submits a dissertation prospectus and is admitted as a doctoral candidate.

If a student enters the program with a master's degree, a maximum of thirty hours (of the seventy-two) of relevant course credit from the student's master's degree program may be included in the doctoral program of studies.

Major Requirements
A student must have an average grade of B for all courses in the program and make satisfactory progress toward the completion of the program competencies to remain in good standing.
Select one of the following course groups:9
Introduction to Research
and Statistical Methods 1
and Statistical Methods 2
or
Advanced Qualitative Research
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced reseach methods course (chosen by student in consultation with the advisor and doctoral committee)
EDP 794CSeminar3
EDP 710Seminar:Educational Research3
EDP 740Principles of Instruction3
Select two of the following courses: 6
Psychological Foundations of Learning
Human Development and Behavior
The Adult Learner
Minor 18
Total Hours42

Doctoral Committee

Each student's doctoral committee shall be composed of a minimum of five members, the majority of whom are regular graduate faculty members. At least two members of the committee (including the permanent advisor), but no more than three must be members of the Educational Psychology Faculty. At least one member of the doctoral committee must be from the student's minor area of study.  No more than one person may be a non-member of the Graduate Faculty of WVU. One member of the committee, who has professional relevance to the program of study, must be from outside the program area. The Doctoral Program Coordinator, the Chair of the Department, and the Dean of the College must approve the composition of the doctoral committee.

The duties of the doctoral committee are to: (1) discuss and review the program of study, (2) monitor progress in the program of study, (3) review changes to the approved program of study, (4) evaluate the competency products, (5) approve the dissertation prospectus and admit the student to candidacy, and (6) supervise and approve the dissertation.

The student with the approval of the student's permanent advisor may initiate changes in committee membership.  Such a change must be agreed to by the member being replaced (if still available to serve), the student, the major advisor, the new committee member, and the Dean.  After approval of any committee membership change, a record of the new committee composition shall be filed in the CEHS Office of Student Advising and Records and in the Educational Psychology Program student file.

Competency Requirements

As an integral part of the Doctoral Program in Educational Psychology, students are required to demonstrate mastery of competencies by producing written products that require them to make use of the work in their formal program of study.  The student's committee in collaboration will describe the specific nature of how these competencies will be demonstrated with the student.  The competencies are met through satisfactory completion of projects, activities, and/or other experiences. 

Competency outcomes will be assessed through three competency products developed by students in the program.  These products are in the areas of (a) learning and development, (b) instruction, and (c) research.  These products will be developed and assessed according to specifications created by a subcommittee organized by the student's adviser.  The student and his/her adviser will select two members for each subcommittee from the members of the student's doctoral committee.  The third member of each subcommittee will be appointed by the full doctoral committee (in consultation with the student and his/her adviser) and must have expertise in the area being assessed.  Recommendations for the third member from the student and his/her adviser are welcomed. 

Admission to Candidacy

Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree shall be granted only to persons holding a master's degree. Students may enter the doctoral program without a master's degree but must earn a master's degree within the program before advancing to candidacy for the doctoral program. This master's program shall require a thesis. 

Admission to candidacy occurs after:

  1. Successfully completing an acceptable Master's Degree.
  2. Filing an approved program of study.
  3. Successfully completing competency requirements for the Major (in the areas of Learning and  Development, Instruction, and Research) and the requirements for the Minor.
  4. Satisfactory completion of College requirements (i.e., a student is officially admitted to candidacy for the Ed.D. after obtaining unanimous approval of the written dissertation prospectus from the doctoral committee). 
  5. A signed copy of the approved prospectus and the form for "Admission to Candidacy for Ed.D." is filed in the CEHS Office of Student Advising and Records. (This constitutes a contract for the dissertation research that the student may begin to conduct.)

Dissertation

Students are to meet the competency requirements before submitting a dissertation prospectus to the doctoral committee.  The prospectus must be prepared, in consultation with the doctoral committee chairperson, on a topic in the major field, showing a potential for contribution to existing knowledge.  Once the doctoral committee chairperson approves the prospectus, the student will schedule a meeting of the full doctoral committee to have the prospectus examined.  The committee may accept, reject, or require modification of the prospectus.  Each committee member will sign an approved prospectus, including all modifications specified by the committee.  The approved prospectus will be filed in the Office of Student Advising and Records and in the Educational Psychology Program student file.

A final oral defense of the completed dissertation shall be held.  All doctoral committee members (or approved substitutes) shall be present for the dissertation defense.  A committee member other than the student's advisor may serve as dissertation chairperson if the person is a regular member of the graduate faculty and if the student and all members concur in writing.  Meetings of the doctoral committee are open to the public, except when in executive session. 

Major Learning Goals

educational psychology

The principal goal of the Educational Psychology program is the education and training of professionals who will focus on teaching and learning environments as they carry out their missions associated with instruction, service, and research. Professional preparation centers on the following three content areas: a) Learning and development, b) Instructional development, and c) Measurement, research, and statistics. Additional learning goals associated with specialized majors are provided below.

Graduate Certificate in Health Professions Education

  • Use a systematic process to conduct a needs assessment of learners in healthcare education, design educational interventions and materials, integrate emerging technologies.
  • Design face-to-face, blended, and online learning environments incorporating research-based learning principles that address teaching and assessment decisions.
  • Evaluate the efficiency, effectiveness, and appeal of healthcare learning environments.
  • Design studies and disseminate impacts of designed learning environments to prepare healthcare professionals to translate skills and knowledge for benefit of patient care and healthcare systems.
  • Develop an educational intervention plan for a healthcare environment.

Master of Arts: Program Evaluation and Research area of emphasis

  • Demonstrate understanding of the philosophical and historical foundations of inquiry.
  • Apply appropriate quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research tools to answer practical educational, programmatic, and other social research questions.
  • Apply appropriate program evaluation tools to conduct formative and summative evaluations of existing and prospective educational programs.
  • Demonstrate understanding of ethical issues in research and evaluation.
  • Create informative reports of research and evaluation studies tailored appropriately for multiple stakeholders and decision-makers.

Master of Arts: Child Development and Family Studies area of emphasis

  • To understand and apply theories and current research on child development and family studies.
  • To recognize and understand the complexities of diversity (e.g., SES, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity) in families according to relationship dynamics, gender roles, parent-child relationships, and other dimensions of family life.
  • To foster critical thinking relative to the scholarly literature in the field and the applications of knowledge to work with children, adolescents, and families.
  • To develop the knowledge and skills for interpreting research as well as other scholarly-derived literature.
  • To conduct original research through the application of critical thinking and research skills and content-based scholarly-derived knowledge.
  • To build professional development skills that may include preparation for an applied career working with children, adolescents, and/or families or doctoral studies to pursue an academic career.
  • To advance and foster students’ intellectual interests and their career goals.

Child Dev / Family Studies Courses

CDFS 541. Cognitive Development of the Child. 3 Hours.

Piaget's basic theory, including his view of perceptual, symbolic, motor and logico-mathematical development, across the life span.

CDFS 591. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CDFS 593A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

CDFS 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CDFS 640. Survey of Family Studies. 3 Hours.

Comprehensive overview of theoretical and empirical literature of the family.

CDFS 645. Socio-Emotional Development of Children. 3 Hours.

A study and examination of contemporary theory and research into various facets of the socialization process in infancy and childhood.

CDFS 647. Comparative Study of Family. 3 Hours.

Family diversity and multiculturalism in an ever-changing U.S. society is examined using the comparative method for analysis.

CDFS 648. Theories of Child and Adolescent Development. 3 Hours.

Examination and comparison of theoretical perspectives of child and adolescent development including traditional and newly emerging theories.

CDFS 649. Socialization Processes. 3 Hours.

Examination of the contexts that affect infant, child, and adolescent development, including family, peers, schools, neighborhood, media, and large societal influences.

CDFS 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of child development and family studies. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

CDFS 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

C&I 693Z. Special Topics. 1-6Hr. A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

CDFS 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

CDFS 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

CDFS 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

CDFS 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology). These tuition-waived continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.

Educational Psychology Courses

EDP 512. Research and Evaluation in Counseling. 3 Hours.

This course fulfills the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) education and training standards related to research and program evaluation.

EDP 593A. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of Contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

EDP 600. Educational Psychology. 3 Hours.

Designed for beginning graduate students. Psychological principles of learning and development as they relate to processes of instruction.

EDP 610. Measurement/Assessment for the Classroom Teacher. 3 Hours.

An examination and application of classroom testing and measurement principles in the assessment and evaluation of student performance.

EDP 611. Measurement/Evaluation in Educational Psychology. 3 Hours.

An introductory course in measurement and evaluation in educational psychology with an emphasis on the principles and procedures in conducting and analyzing educational measurement.

EDP 612. Introduction to Research. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts, strategies, methodologies, designs, and procedures of research in education. Major emphasis on integrating research designs, measurements, and statistics for initiating research projects, collecting and analyzing data, and interpreting and reporting findings.

EDP 613. Statistical Methods 1. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts of statistical models, distributions, probability, random variables, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, regressions, correlation, transformation, F and chi-square distributions, and analysis of variance and sample size.

EDP 614. Statistical Methods 2. 3 Hours.

PR: EDP 613. Extension of basic concepts of statistical models, design of experiments, multiway classification models, factorials, split plot design, simple covariance, orthogonal comparisons, multiple linear and nonlinear regression and correlation analysis, chi-square and nonparametric statistics.

EDP 617. Program Evaluation. 3 Hours.

PR: EDP 613 and SCFD 615. An awareness of the purposes, ethics, issues of design, methods, and models of program evaluation.

EDP 618. Mixing Research Methodologies. 3 Hours.

PR: EDP 613 and SCFD 615. Students will focus on choices available for and processes involved in mixing qualitative and quantitative research and evaluation methodologies.

EDP 619. Survey Research Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: EDP 613. Course addresses how to design, implement, and analyze surveys for the purposes of social sciences research.

EDP 640. Instructional Design. 3 Hours.

PR: Graduate standing. Introduces the major components of the instructional design process, from needs analysis through evaluation and implementation. Students will demonstrate the elements of the process with a design plan for an instructional project.

EDP 680. Capstone Seminar in Program Evaluation. 3 Hours.

PR: EDP 617. Emphasis on initiating and completing a program evaluation at the local, region or state level under guidance of instructor. Application of evaluative concepts, methods and theories as they relate to practice in different professions. Exposure to differing evaluation literature focused on theory and practice.

EDP 685. Practicum. 1-12 Hours.

PR: Consent.

EDP 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

EDP 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

EDP 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

EDP 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

EDP 698. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

EDP 700. Psychological Foundations of Learning. 3 Hours.

Psychological foundations of major learning theories and their implications for instructional procedures.

EDP 702. Human Development and Behavior. 3 Hours.

Contemporary psychological literature on human development examined and analyzed. Research and theory are examined with emphasis on the implications for classroom behavior and the educational process. It is recommended that students complete EDP 600 prior to registering for this course.

EDP 703. The Adult Learner. 3 Hours.

Analysis of significant characteristics of adult behavior to be considered in planning for adult learning. Contemporary theories are analyzed with emphasis on their implications for the educational process. It is recommended that students complete EDP 600 prior to registering for this course.

EDP 710. Seminar:Educational Research. 3 Hours.

PR: EDP 613 and SCFD 615. Identification of research problems in education, consideration of alternative designs and methods of investigation, and development of a research proposal at the advanced graduate level.

EDP 711. Multivariate Methods 1. 3 Hours.

PR: EDP 614. Basic matrix operations, multiple regression analysis, discriminant analysis for two groups, multivariate analysis if variance for one and two-way designs, and analysis of covariance involving multiple covariates. Applying SPSS Procedure Matrix for data analyses.

EDP 730. Cognition and Learning. 3 Hours.

Theories of knowledge representation including information processing models, learning strategies across content areas and transfer of learning strategies; additional focus on problem-solving, expertise, strategic reading, and strategy instruction.

EDP 731. Cognition in Social Contexts. 3 Hours.

PR: EDP 730. Application of social learning theory in current literature and practice. Emphasis on theory in application in cooperative and group learning situations.

EDP 740. Principles of Instruction. 3 Hours.

Basic principles of teaching-learning process implied in major learning theories; study of factors in learning, variables in instructional programming, and principles of instructional design.

EDP 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Supervised practice in college teaching of education psychology. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

EDP 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

EDP 792A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

EDP 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

EDP 794A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

EDP 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

EDP 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

EDP 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

EDP 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations). Grading is normal.

EDP 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

EDP 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology.) These tuition-waived, continuing education courses are graded on a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.


Faculty

Chair & Professor

  • Reagan P. Curtis - Ph.D. (University of California at Santa Barbara)
    Cognition, Development, Research, Program Evaluation and Statistics, Educational Psychology (Coordinator); Evaluation and Research (Coordinator)

Assistant Chair

  • Amy Root - Ph.D. (University Maryland, College Park)
    Child Development and Family Studies (Coordinator); Parenting and the Development of Emotional Competence, Individual Differences, Development of Shy/Wary Behavior

Professors

  • Barbara Warash - Ed.D. (West Virginia University)
    Director of the WVU Nursery School, Early Childhood Education, Reggio Emilia
  • William Beasley - Ed.D. (University of Georgia)
    Instructor presence in online environments, integration of external technologies with learning management systems, elearning in cross-cultural contexts

Associate professors

  • Kristin Moilanen - Ph.D. (University of Nebraska)
    Adolescent Development, Self Regulation, Risk Behavior, Family Relationships
  • Jessica Troilo - Ph.D. (University of Missouri)
    Cultural Conceptions of Fathers, Divorced Fatherhood, the Influence of Social Media on Relationships

Assistant professors

  • Sara Anderson - Ph.D. (Tufts University)
    Long term pre-K effects, Pre-K quality among diverse populations, Neighborhood effects, Residential mobility
  • Paul R. Hernandez - Ph.D (University of Connecticut)
    Measurement, Statistics, Research Methods, Program Evaluation, Applied Social and Educational Psychology
  • Melissa Patchan - Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
    Mechanisms of Peer Assessment of Writing, Effectiveness and Validity of Peer Feedback, Issues of Measurement, Multiple Sources, and Validity of Peer Ratings
  • Karen Rambo-Hernandez - Ph.D (University of Connecticut)
    Educational Psychology, Multilevel Statistical Modeling, Longitudinal analysis, Assessment of Academic Growth and Diversity in STEM
  • Abhik Roy - Ph.D. (Western Michigan University)
    Program Evaluation, Unification of Evaluation Practice and Theory (Grand Theory), Research on Evaluation (ROE), Evaluation of Non Academic Units within Academia
  • Suzanne Walraff-Hartman - Ph.D. (George Mason University)
    Three to Five-Year Child Development and Learning, Childcare Preschool Environmental Factors, At-risk Child Populations

Clinical assistant professor

  • Gregory D. Epps - Ed.D. (West Virginia University)

Teaching Associate Professor

  • Patricia Haught - Ed.D. (West Virginia University)
    Cognitive Development, Learning Strategies

Teaching Assistant Professor

  • Nancy Taylor - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    Parenting Education, Conflict and Crisis Management, Family Therapeutic Interventions

Clinical instructor

  • Nancy Wolfe-Dilgard - M.A. (West Virginia University)
    Communication in Families, Adolescent Drug and Alcohol, Gambling and Families; Parenting Infants, Toddlers, and Adolescents

Early Childhood Teachers

  • Keri Law - M.A. (West Virginia University)
    Early Childhood Education, Early Childhood Teacher
  • Melissa Workman - M.S., M.A. (West Virginia University)
    Early Childhood Education, Early Childhood Teacher, Associate Director of the WVU Nursery School

Professor Emeritus

  • Carol Markstrom - Ph.D. (Utah State University)
  • Richard T. Walls - Ph.D (Pennsylvania State University)
  • Anne H. Nardi - Ph.D ( West Virginia University)

Associate Professor Emeritus

  • Floyd L. Stead - Ed.D
    (West Virginia Unversity)