Literacy Education

http://cils.wvu.edu/

Degree Offered

  • Masters of Arts in Literacy Education (Online)

information

This 30-credit Master program, housed in the Curriculum and Instruction/Literacy Studies, Social & Cultural Foundations, Educational Leadership Studies, is nationally accredited through the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) and International Literacy Association (ILA). This graduate program prepares candidates to be certified as Reading Specialists (Pre-K-Adult) and to fulfill the roles of specialized reading professionals currently outlined by the International Literacy Association (ILA).  These roles include:  Interventionist, Literacy Coach and School/Literacy Leader. 

Visit our web site http://cils.wvu.edu/literacy-ed.

FEATURES

  • Online graduate coursework (synchronous and asynchronous)
  • School based intervention practicum
  • Flexible program scheduling (courses offered Fall, Spring and Summer)
  • Fall, Spring and Summer Admission
 
 
Allison Swan Dagen, Ph.D
Program Coordinator, Literacy Education
Allison.Swan@mail.wvu.edu
 
Department Chair,  Samuel F. Stack

Requirements

Professionals with successful teaching experience at the elementary, secondary, or college level may elect to enroll in these courses to increase their competencies as reading teachers, and/or literacy coaches to keep themselves informed of the latest trends and developments in reading education, or to prepare for positions of greater responsibility. Students who plan to enter the teaching field may also wish to enroll in these courses to increase their overall skills and knowledge.

Admission requirements for the Master in Literacy Studies include:

  • Submit WVU Graduate application for admission. The application can be found at https://admissions.wvu.edu/how-to-apply
  • Hold a Bachelor’s degree with a 2.75 GPA or above
  • A valid state teaching license (Attached to application)  
  • All students in the Literacy Program must purchase a subscription for LiveText.  Students submit class assignments and their final portfolio to LiveText.  Please contact your adviser for information.

Master of Arts

  • Students must complete six or more hours in reading within two years after admission (probationary or regular), or admission will be invalidated and the student will be required to reapply.
  • The course requirements in the program lead to reading specialist certification for qualified candidates, assuming candidates meet other state certification requirements.
  • Passing scores on the Praxis II in reading content area required.

Major Requirements

Minimum grade of C- is required in all coursework.
Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required.
Required Courses
RDNG 620Specialized Literacy Professionals3
RDNG 621Reading and Writing Instruction in Elementary Schools3
RDNG 622Content Area Literacy Instruction3
RDNG 624Foundations of Literacy3
RDNG 627Developing Reading Interests3
RDNG 640Instructing Students Who Have Reading Difficulties3
RDNG 682Assessment of Reading Ability3
RDNG 689Intervention for Struggling Readers3
RDNG 726Literacy Leadership3
CEHS Elective3
Total Hours30

Suggested Plan of Study

First SemesterHours
RDNG 6203
RDNG 6213
 6
Second SemesterHours
RDNG 6223
RDNG 6273
 6
Third SemesterHours
Elective3
 3
Fourth SemesterHours
RDNG 6243
RDNG 6403
 6
Fifth SemesterHours
RDNG 6823
RDNG 7263
 6
Sixth SemesterHours
RDNG 6893
 3
Total credit hours: 30

Major Learning Goals

literacy education

The M.A. program in Literacy Education aligns with the International Literacy Association’s Standards for Reading Professionals (2010) and prepares candidates for careers in preK to adult learning contexts. Accordingly, the specific learning goals of the program are as follows:

  • Understand the theoretical and evidence-based foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction and apply this knowledge.
  • Use instructional approaches, materials, and an integrated, comprehensive, balanced curriculum to support student learning in reading and writing.
  • Use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing instruction.
  • Create and engage their students in literacy practices that develop awareness, understanding, respect, and valuing differences in our society.
  • Create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing by integrating foundational knowledge instruction practices approaches and methods curriculum materials and the appropriate use of assessments.
  • Recognize the importance of, demonstrate, and facilitate professional learning and leadership as a career long effort and responsibility.
  • Serve as Reading Specialists, Reading Interventionist, and Literacy Coaches/Supervisors in underserved area of our state.
  • Demonstrate professionalism by serving as leaders and advocates within professional organizations and local communities state holders. 

International Reading Association. (2010). Standards for reading professionals.  Newark, DE: Author.

Courses

RDNG 573. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

RDNG 583. Special Workshop in Reading. 1-6 Hours.

For elementary and secondary students in pre-service education programs, as well as elementary and secondary teachers in in-service education.

RDNG 603. Literature in Elementary School. 3 Hours.

A web-based course that provides information about different aspects of children's literature and discusses classroom implementation.

RDNG 620. Specialized Literacy Professionals. 3 Hours.

The Specialized Literacy Professional (SLP) course addresses history of the role of reading specialist, adult learning theory and contemporary research on the current role of the SLP/Reading Specialist.

RDNG 621. Reading and Writing Instruction in Elementary Schools. 3 Hours.

Examines processes of reading and writing at the elementary school level. Explores instructional practices associated with those processes.

RDNG 622. Content Area Literacy Instruction. 3 Hours.

Presents essential content area literacy skills and examines ways in which they may be developed in various subject matter areas.

RDNG 623. Literacy and the Young Child. 3 Hours.

Focus is on perspectives of young children's reading and writing development and approaches for fostering this development in school and home settings.

RDNG 624. Foundations of Literacy. 3 Hours.

Inquiry into the historical, psychological, and linguistic foundations underpinning literacy instruction. Students will also consider the interdisciplinary nature of the study of literacy.

RDNG 627. Developing Reading Interests. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on methods and techniques for developing reading habits, interests, and tastes and on motivating individuals to read. Special attention is given to instructional practices which support the pursuit of independent reading.

RDNG 630. Teaching the Language Arts. 3 Hours.

Explores the interrelationship of the language arts - writing, reading, speaking, and listening. Special attention is given to understanding instructional practices, organizing language arts programs, and selecting materials.

RDNG 631. Selection and Evaluation of Reading Materials. 3 Hours.

PR: RDNG 621. Survey of critical reading skills, techniques, and procedures with emphasis on the selection of supplementary materials needed for effective developmental and remedial reading programs.

RDNG 640. Instructing Students Who Have Reading Difficulties. 3 Hours.

PR: RDNG 621 and (RDNG 624 or RDNG 622). A methods course that emphasizes ways to intervene when students face reading difficulties. Course focuses on methods that can be used by classroom teachers, reading specialists, and other special teachers of reading and language arts.

RDNG 641. Problems in Reading. 3 Hours.

PR: RDNG 640. A laboratory course in the university reading clinic. Major emphasis on tutoring children who have reading problems.

RDNG 642. Teaching Reading to Children who have Profound Reading Problems. 3 Hours.

Basic course on reading intervention methods. Intended for learning disabilities majors. Emphasis on practicum experience.

RDNG 680. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Seminar for master's degree students stressing special topics concerned with the education and sociological and psychological aspects of language arts instruction.

RDNG 681A. Independent Research in Literacy. 3 Hours.

A program elective, this course offers possibilities for graduate students to pursue independent study and research in literacy. Students study a specific literacy area, theme, or question under the approval and advising of a faculty member.

RDNG 682. Assessment of Reading Ability. 3 Hours.

Focuses on methods and issues related to the assessment of reading ability. Students acquire reading specialist level knowledge and implementation skill of format and informal reading assessment and consider related issues of classroom and clinic application.

RDNG 685. Practicum. 1-12 Hours.

PR: Consent. Practicum type course for master's degree student teaching, and reading administration and supervision practicum experience can be pursued.

RDNG 689. Intervention for Struggling Readers. 3 Hours.

PR: RDNG 640. This practical experience is designed to give literacy education candidates opportunities to apply the theoretical concepts from previous coursework to practical teaching contexts. The practicum is defined as fieldwork experience that combines whole group class meetings, individual intervention sessions with a K-12 student, peer-coaching sessions, and individual supervision sessions.

RDNG 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

RDNG 692. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

RDNG 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

RDNG 694A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

RDNG 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

RDNG 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

RDNG 725. Survey of Reading Research. 3 Hours.

A research course in which each student will complete an individual problem in an area of special interest.

RDNG 726. Literacy Leadership. 3 Hours.

PR: 18 hours of M.A. requirements. Roles, responsibilities, and practices of reading specialists, administrators, and classroom teachers in organizing literacy programs from early childhood through college.

RDNG 732. Survey of Major Problems in the Language Arts. 3 Hours.

PR: RDNG 630 or consent. An advanced course covering major problems of the teacher or supervisor of language arts instruction. A research course in which the student completes an individual problem.

RDNG 743. Instructional Intervention for Reading Difficulties. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Advanced course focusing on ways to assess and instruct students who have reading difficulties. Explores theories, issues, and methodology.

RDNG 744. Advanced Clinical Reading. 3 Hours.

PR: RDNG 641. Laboratory course in remedial reading. Emphasis on diagnosis and treatment of reading difficulties.

RDNG 780. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. The interrelationships among the language arts: mental, physical, and psychological deterrents to language arts; and similar topics.

RDNG 781. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Admission to doctoral program in reading and consent. Advanced seminar. Weaknesses and strengths in current reading programs, needed research in reading, and suggestions for improving reading instruction at elementary, secondary, and college levels.

RDNG 785. Practicum. 1-12 Hours.

PR: Consent. Practical application of reading theory to organizing and conducting developmental and remedial reading programs.

RDNG 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of reading. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be S/U.).

RDNG 791A. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advance topics not covered in regulary scheduled courses.

RDNG 792. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

RDNG 793. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

RDNG 794A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

RDNG 795. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

RDNG 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

RDNG 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

RDNG 798. Thesis or Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

RDNG 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking course work credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

RDNG 900. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology.) The continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.

RDNG 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology.) These tuition waived continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.


Faculty

Chair

  • Samuel F. Stack, Jr - Ph.D. (University of South Carolina)
    Social Foundations of Education

Program Director

  • Allison Swan Dagen - Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
    Instructional and Learning Reading

Associate Professors

  • Aimee L. Morewood - Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
  • Charline Barnes Rowland - Ed.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)