This is an archived copy of the 2014-15 Catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.wvu.edu.

Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

http://eberly.wvu.edu

History of the College

Starting with the initial charter of WVU by the Legislature in 1867, the liberal arts and the sciences were important and central elements of the University.  The College of Arts and Sciences was formally created in 1895, and eleven students received degrees from the college in 1896.  In the 1911–12 academic years, the West Virginia Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was established within the College of Arts and Sciences.

On July 1, 1993, the name of the college was changed to the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences to recognize and commemorate the generosity of the Eberly family, the Eberly Foundation, and the Eberly Family Charitable Trust.

Today, the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences awards degrees to around 2,000 students every year.  It remains the heart of West Virginia University, providing students with a liberal education in the areas of literature and the humanities, mathematics and natural sciences, and social and behavioral sciences.  In addition to teaching, the College’s 265 faculty members are actively engaged in research and scholarship, publishing approximately 400 articles and five or more books each year.

Mission

The primary mission of the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences is to promote the full development of the student as an individual and as a member of society.  Students earning degrees in the College fulfill certain broad basic-education requirements and study at least one subject in some depth.  The degree requirements are intended to carry forward what is usually termed “a general education,” thus providing a foundation for continued growth and development after graduation.

Clearly, one purpose of a college education is to help students acquire knowledge and skills both for self-fulfillment and in preparation for the roles they will subsequently play in society.  A less obvious but equally important purpose is to impart certain attitudes to students.  In the interest of fulfilling both purposes, the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences strives to help students acquire the specific attributes listed below.

Knowledge

  • Knowledge of the main principles, facts, concepts, and theories in a major area of concentration
  • Knowledge of Western and non-Western civilizations: their distinctive characters (belief systems, languages, intellectual, and artistic contributions), and their origins, development, and present status
  • Knowledge and appreciation of the environment in which one operates (physical, biotic, social, technological, aesthetic), including knowledge of change processes (evolutionary, technological, social, intellectual) and knowledge of past adaptations as a basis for predicting the consequences of contemporary actions and changes
  • A knowledge and appreciation of the arts, of their humanizing and energizing effects, and of one’s connection with the arts through one’s impulses toward creativity
  • A familiarity with the various technical languages (statistics, linguistics, etc.) that are increasingly necessary to understand the major approaches in the sciences and humanities

Skills

  • Skills in the sophisticated techniques of a major area of concentration
  • Skills in communication using a variety of channels including writing, speaking, reading, listening, and viewing
  • Skills in analyzing and solving problems by recognizing ambiguities, using proper logic, marshaling pertinent facts and arguments, and using mathematical techniques where appropriate
  • Skills in the use of the imaginative and synthetic processes of the mind, including innovative thinking and recognition of the connections among a variety of intellectual frameworks and matrices.
  • Skills involved in decision making, including the ability to recognize alternatives, project consequences, and assume the responsibility for making decisions.

Attitudes

  • An attitude of dispassionate self-appraisal based upon an understanding of one’s own nature and characterized by an awareness of one’s own strengths and weaknesses
  • An attitude of open-mindedness, permitting one to see beyond the limits of one’s own occupation, economic status, language, and culture, and including a respect for opinions different from one’s own
  • A willingness to recognize and respect ethical obligations and the rights of others
  • A commitment to truth-seeking, characterized by objectivity, utilization of evidence, intellectual curiosity, and the search for wisdom

Degree Options

The Eberly College of Arts and Sciences offers the following degrees:

  • Bachelor of Art (B.A.).  See B.A. tab above.
  • Bachelor of Science (B.S.).  See B.S. tab above.
  • Bachelor of Multidisciplinary Studies (B.MdS.).  See Multidisciplinary Studies Program link.
  • Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.).  See School of Social Work link.

Minors

Most major programs in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences also offer formal academic minors.  In addition, minors are available in Africana studies, leadership studies, Native American studies, and statistics.  If a student successfully completes the requirements for a formal minor, this will be recorded on the student’s official record and will appear on transcripts.

Requirements for academic minors are set by the department offering the minor.  A formal minor must include at least fifteen hours of coursework with a minimum of nine hours at the upper-division level (course number of 300 or above).  Specific courses may be required as well as a minimum grade or grade point average for courses in the minor.  Courses in the minor may not be taken pass/fail.  The minor field may not be the same as the student’s major field.

Certificate Programs

Global Engagement

Students in the Eberly College,  may earn this Certificate, regardless of their major.  Completion of the Global Engagement Certificate demonstrates the student’s knowledge of diverse cultures, as well as the ability to communicate and interact effectively with people of different cultural background.  Students will be required to apply their knowledge of contemporary issues and global social contexts to their course work and their broader citizenship.  Students must complete fifteen hours of approved courses and have the option to earn part of the certificate on campus, or to earn all of their credits abroad by completing one of the two options described below.

Option 1: Language-Intensive Option (15 credits minimum)

Language Component

6-9 credit hours of academic coursework in one language other than English, beyond the core language requirement (typically 204 or the equivalent, as determined by the Department of World Languages, Literature, and Linguistics), completed at either WVU or a foreign academic institution; and

International Coursework Component

6-9 credit hours, beyond the language component (above) requirement, of coursework bearing the "G" designator.*

Option 2: Travel-Intensive Option (15 credits minimum):

15 credit hours of coursework bearing the "G" designator.* It is recommended that at least part of this coursework be earned during an extended, semester-long experience.

*

Courses carrying the “G” designation are approved for the designation by the Office of International Programs and include courses taken abroad either with WVU, at an exchange university, or through another higher education school or organization.  WVU offers approximately 60 WVU faculty-led programs per year, with one to three academic courses typically offered in each faculty-led program. There are over 50 exchange linkages with universities abroad, many of them comprehensive and some specialized in areas such as health sciences, engineering, business, language, etc.  WVU also has agreements with approximately one dozen affiliate programs (ISEP, for example), each with a wide selection of programs and courses.  An Eberly College student may take advantage of any WVU “G” courses for which he/she meets the pre-requisites or restrictions. Courses to be counted toward academic major requirements must be approved by the designated authority in the student’s major program.

Professional Writing and Editing

English majors can also earn a Professional Writing and Editing Certificate (please see English Department Catalog section).

Bachelor of Arts

  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Criminology
  • Economics
  • English
  • English Secondary Education*
  • Environmental Geoscience
  • Geography
  • History
  • Individualized Major
  • International Studies
  • Latin American Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics Secondary Education*
  • Multidisciplinary Studies
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Slavic and East European Studies
  • Social Studies Secondary Education*
  • Sociology and Anthropology
  • Women's and Gender Studies
  • World Languages
  • World Languages Secondary Eduction*

* Please refer to the College of Education and Human Services section of the catalog for program details. The teacher education program is a five-year program culminating in two degrees which are awarded simultaneously: an Eberly baccalaureate degree and a College of Education and Human Services master’s degree.

Bachelor of Arts Requirements

Students must complete WVU General Education Curriculum requirements, College B.A. requirements, major requirements, and electives to total 120 hours.

University Requirements / General Education Curriculum

Students who would like for transfer credits to be applied to University requirements, (GEC, Writing, and Capstone), need to seek approval from the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies (see ECAS Undergraduate webpages).

Every student at West Virginia University has to fulfill the requirements for the General Education Curriculum.  The main purpose of this curriculum is to insure that all of graduates are exposed to a variety of fields, as described in the 9 GEC Objectives.  Please read the full description of the GEC and of the policies that govern it; a list of all the courses that meet all the various GEC Objectives can be found on the Office of the University Registrar. Students are strongly encouraged to work with their advisers to select GEC courses that may broaden and strengthen their interest in their major field.  GEC courses can also be used to explore new areas to which students have not yet been exposed.
 

General Education Curriculum

Please use this link to view a list of courses that meet each GEC requirement.

NOTE: Some major requirements will fulfill specific GEC requirements. Please see the curriculum requirements listed below for details on which GECs you will need to select.

General Education Curriculum
ENGL 101
  & ENGL 102
Composition And Rhetoric
   and Composition And Rhetoric
3-6
or ENGL 103 Accelerated Academic Writing
GEC 2A - Mathematics3-4
GEC 2B - Natural and Physical Science7-8
GEC 2C - Additional GEC 2A, B or C3
GEC 3 - The Past and Its Traditions3
GEC 4 - Issues of Contemporary Society3
GEC 5 - Artistic Expression3
GEC 6 - The Individual in Society3
GEC 6F - First Year Seminar1-3
GEC 7 - American Culture3
GEC 8 - Western Culture3
GEC 9 - Non-Western Culture3
Total Hours38-45

 

Writing Course

Objective 1 of the General Education Curriculum (GEC) , requires the successful completion of a writing course (“W”), preferably in the major.  All students must successfully complete at least one course that requires substantial writing assignments and in which the grade is partially determined by writing skills. English 102 or 103 must be completed before fulfilling the writing course requirement. Students who have several majors only need to complete one W course, unless the W course is part of the requirements for the major. 
 
Writing courses at WVU are carefully crafted by faculty and are based on the principle of process writing.  Transfer courses usually do not fulfill the writing requirement.  However, in exceptional cases, students can petition the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies to accept a transfer course approved for the GEC.  Students will need to provide evidence of process writing.  When consulting the list of writing courses , students should note that not all courses listed are offered every semester as writing courses; students must register for the W section only of the course that fulfills the writing requirement.
 

Capstone Experience

The capstone experience is defined as an academic experience in which students demonstrate, in a significant project that has both an oral and a written component, their abilities to gather information, to think critically and to integrate the theoretical and/or practical knowledge that they acquired throughout their undergraduate careers, and to reflect on the ethical issues that are implicit in their projects.
Students completing several majors need to complete one Capstone course per major.  Because of their unique concept, Capstone courses can never be transferred from another institution, including study abroad. L ist of current capstone courses .
 

College Requirements

  1. Foreign Language.  Completion of level 204 (fourth semester).  Students with no prior instruction in a language will satisfy this requirement by successful completion of courses 101, 102, 203, and 204 (or other approved courses) in that language.  Students with prior instruction in a language must take the placement test in that language and begin at the level they are placed and complete 204.  Students who place beyond the 204 level will satisfy the requirement by successful completion of one appropriate 300-level course in that language. (For information about placement and explanation of various options and other approved courses, see listings under World Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics in the WVU Undergraduate Catalog, go to: http://worldlang.wvu.edu , or contact the department.) Courses used to fulfill this requirement are in addition to those used to fulfill any GEC requirement.
  2. International Studies.  Students must satisfactorily complete three semester hours of study of foreign countries or cultures other than those of modern western Europe or Canada, and/or their role and interaction within the contemporary international system.  Completion of a course that meets GEC Objective 9 (non-western cultures) will fulfill this requirement.
  3. Fine Arts. Students must satisfactorily complete a minimum of three semester hours focused on the fine arts.  Completion of a course that meets GEC Objective 5 (artistic expression) will fulfill this requirement.
  4. Grade Point Average.  A cumulative GPA of 2.0 is required for graduation. All departments and degree programs in the College require at least a 2.0 (C) cumulative grade point average for admission; some departments or programs require a higher grade point average (overall or in the discipline) for admission or graduation.  See specific departments for requirements.
  5. Individual department requirements may be more directive than the College’s core B.A. requirements, so long as those requirements are met.

Students who would like for transfer credits to be applied to the College B.A. requirements need to seek approval from the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies.

Major Subject Requirements are listed separately in the catalog by department or degree program.  To qualify for graduation, the student must have spent at least two semesters and have accumulated a minimum of thirty semester hours and completed major requirements in a degree program.

Except with the approval of the department chair or degree program coordinator, no upper-division course (300 or 400 level) in the major taken at another institution will be counted toward meeting the requirements of the major.

Credit Limitations

The following do not count toward the hours required for graduation:

1.   Courses in which the grade received is other than A, B, C, D, P, or S.  Credit by examination, however, is counted toward hours required for graduation unless it was granted for courses otherwise excluded in this list

2.   Any course passed more than once, unless a course is designated as repeatable in the catalog

3.   More than 72 hours of transfer credit from accredited junior or community colleges

4.   More than 18 semester hours of credit for which only a grade of P is recorded (See Pass/Fail Grading)

5.   Any course in which the final grade is F.  The student must take the course again in residence at WVU if the student wishes to replace the F through the D/F repeat option.

42-Hour Rule

There is no limit to the number of credits students can earn in a subject. However, in Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) programs in the Eberly College, a maximum of forty-two hours in one subject (e.g., BIOL, FRCH, POLS) may be counted toward the minimum hours for graduation. If a B.A. student exceeds forty-two credits in one subject, then the excess must be matched by an equal number of credits in any other subject.  For example, if the minimum hours for graduation is 120, and a student earns forty-six hours in COMM (42 + 4), that student will require 124 hours to graduate (120 + 4). If the minimum hours for graduation is 120, and a student earns forty-three hours in PSYC (42 + 1), that student will require 121 hours to graduate (120 + 1).

Please note that some courses are excluded from the 42-Hour Rule count:

1.   199 (orientation) and 491 (professional field experience) courses in any subject are excluded from the 42-Hour count.

2.   For English (ENGL), the 42-Hour count excludes ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 103; for English majors who obtain a concentration in creative writing or professional writing and editing (PWE), a maximum of 60 hours in English (in addition to ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or ENGL 103), may be included within the 120 hours required for graduation.

3.   For foreign languages, the 42-Hour count excludes the six to twelve hours used to fulfill the B.A. foreign language requirement of the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences.

4.   For Sociology and Anthropology (SOCA), the count is done separately for sociology and anthropology (42 hours in sociology courses and 42 hours in anthropology courses). Normally anthropology courses are the SOCA courses with a “5” as the middle number: 252, 254, 355, 358, 450, etc.


 

 

 

 

Bachelor of Science

  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Forensic and Investigative Science
  • Geology
  • Industrial Mathematics and Statistics
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Psychology

Bachelor of Science Requirements

Students must complete WVU General Education Curriculum requirements, College B.S. requirements, major requirements, and electives to total 120 hours.

University Requirements / General Education Curriculum

Students who would like for transfer credits to be applied to University requirements, (GEC, Writing, and Capstone), need to seek approval from the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies (see ECAS Undergraduate webpages).

Every student at West Virginia University has to fulfill the requirements for the General Education Curriculum.  The main purpose of this curriculum is to insure that all of graduates are exposed to a variety of fields, as described in the 9 GEC Objectives.  Please read the full description of the GEC and of the policies that govern it; a list of all the courses that meet all the various GEC Objectives can be found on the Office of the University Registrar. Students are strongly encouraged to work with their advisers to select GEC courses that may broaden and strengthen their interest in their major field.  GEC courses can also be used to explore new areas to which students have not yet been exposed.

General Education Curriculum

Please use this link to view a list of courses that meet each GEC requirement.

NOTE: Some major requirements will fulfill specific GEC requirements. Please see the curriculum requirements listed below for details on which GECs you will need to select.

General Education Curriculum
ENGL 101
  & ENGL 102
Composition And Rhetoric
   and Composition And Rhetoric
3-6
or ENGL 103 Accelerated Academic Writing
GEC 2A - Mathematics3-4
GEC 2B - Natural and Physical Science7-8
GEC 2C - Additional GEC 2A, B or C3
GEC 3 - The Past and Its Traditions3
GEC 4 - Issues of Contemporary Society3
GEC 5 - Artistic Expression3
GEC 6 - The Individual in Society3
GEC 6F - First Year Seminar1-3
GEC 7 - American Culture3
GEC 8 - Western Culture3
GEC 9 - Non-Western Culture3
Total Hours38-45

 

Writing Course

Objective 1 of the General Education Curriculum (GEC) , requires the successful completion of a writing course (“W”), preferably in the major.  All students must successfully complete at least one course that requires substantial writing assignments and in which the grade is partially determined by writing skills. English 102 or 103 must be completed before fulfilling the writing course requirement. Students who have several majors only need to complete one W course, unless the W course is part of the requirements for the major. 
 
Writing courses at WVU are carefully crafted by faculty and are based on the principle of process writing.  Transfer courses usually do not fulfill the writing requirement.  However, in exceptional cases, students can petition the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies to accept a transfer course approved for the GEC.  Students will need to provide evidence of process writing. When consulting the list of writing courses , students should note that not all courses listed are offered every semester as writing courses; students must register for the W section only of the course that fulfills the writing requirement.
 

Capstone Experience

The capstone experience is defined as an academic experience in which students demonstrate, in a significant project that has both an oral and a written component, their abilities to gather information, to think critically and to integrate the theoretical and/or practical knowledge that they acquired throughout their undergraduate careers, and to reflect on the ethical issues that are implicit in their projects.
Students completing several majors need to complete one Capstone course per major.  Because of their unique concept, Capstone courses can never be transferred from another institution, including study abroad. L ist of current capstone courses .

 

College Requirements

  1. Foreign Language.  Students completing an Eberly College bachelor of science program are encouraged (but not required) to complete two semesters of one foreign language beyond language taken at the high school level.  Individual B.S. programs may require foreign language.
  2. International Studies.  Students must satisfactorily complete three semester hours of study of foreign countries or cultures other than those of modern western Europe or Canada, and/or their role and interaction within the contemporary international system.  Completion of a course that meets GEC Objective 9 (non-western cultures) will fulfill this requirement.
  3. Mathematics.  Satisfactory completion of MATH 155 or ( MATH 153 and MATH 154) is required for students earning an Eberly College B.S. degree.
  4. Science.  Students must complete a minimum of twenty-one hours of science coursework in each of three disciplines.  There are six disciplines: biology, chemistry, computer science, geology/geography, math/statistics, and physics. See list below for applicable courses in these disciplines.  Courses used to fulfill this requirement may be used simultaneously to satisfy GEC and or major requirements.  See table below for courses applicable to satisfy the B.S. "Science" requirements.
  5. Courses used to fulfill the Eberly B.S. requirements may be used simultaneously to satisfy GEC and or major requirements.
  6. Grade Point Average.  A cumulative GPA of 2.0 is required for graduation. All departments and degree programs in the College require at least a 2.0 (C) cumulative grade point average for admission; some departments or programs require a higher grade point average (overall or in the discipline) for admission or graduation.  See specific departments for requirements. 
  7. Individual department requirements may be more directive than the College’s core B.A. requirements, so long as those requirements are met.

Students who would like for transfer credits to be applied to the College B.S. requirements need to seek approval from the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies.

Major Subject Requirements are listed separately in the catalog by department or degree program.  To qualify for graduation, the student must have spent at least two semesters and have accumulated a minimum of thirty semester hours and completed major requirements in a degree program.

Transfer Credit.  Except with the approval of the department chair or degree program coordinator, no upper-division course (300 or 400 level) in the major taken at another institution will be counted toward meeting the requirements of the major.

Credit Limitations

The following do not count toward the hours required for graduation:

  1. Courses in which the grade received is other than A, B, C, D, P, or S.  Credit by examination, however, is counted toward hours required for graduation unless it was granted for courses otherwise excluded in this list.
     
  2. Any course passed more than once, unless a course is designated as repeatable in the catalog.
     
  3. More than 72 hours of transfer credit from accredited junior or community colleges.
     
  4. More than eighteen semester hours of credit for which only a grade of P is recorded. (See Pass/Fail Grading.)

  5. Any course in which the final grade is F.  The student must take the course again in residence at WVU if the student wishes to replace the F through the D/F repeat option.

 B.S. Science Requirement

Students must complete 6-8 credits in the three areas of their choice for a minimum of 21 credits21
Area I- Biology *8
Principles of Biology
   and Introductory Physiology
Area II-Chemistry8/10
Select one of the following pairs:
Survey of Chemistry
   and Survey of Chemistry
Fundamentals of Chemistry
   and Fundamentals of Chemistry
Principles of Chemistry
   and Principles of Chemistry
Area III- Computer Science8
Introduction-Computer Science
   and Introduction-Data Structures
Area IV- Geology/Geography6/7
Select one of the following pairs:
Planet Earth
   and Planet Earth Laboratory
Environmental Geoscience
   and Environmental Geoscience Lab
Environmental Geoscience
   and Environmental Geoscience Lab
AND select one of the following:
Earth Through Time
   and Earth Through Time Laboratory
Physical Oceanography
Fossils and Evolution
Area V- Math/Statistics6/8
Math/Statistics Option 1:
Calculus 2
   and Multivariable Calculus
Math/Statistics Option 2:
Elemntry Statistical Inference
Intro Probability & Statistics
AND select one of the following:
Intermediate Statistcl Methods
Sampling Methods
Statistical Analysis System
Calculus 2
Area VI- Physics8
Select one of the following pairs:
Introductory Physics
   and Introductory Physics
General Physics
   and General Physics
* Students who complete BIOL 101/103 and BIOL 102/104 may substitute BIOL 101, 102, 103 and 104 for BIOL 115. Under this option, students must satisfactorily complete five courses to meet the Area I-Biology requirement for the Bachelor of Science degree: BIOL 101 & BIOL 102 & BIOL 103 & BIOL 104 & BIOL 117.

 


 

 

 

 

Admission to Arts and Sciences Degree Programs

High school students and transfer students are admitted to majors, while some programs require completion of a few basic courses; specific requirements are described in departmental sections that follow.  For current students who wish to move to an Eberly degree program, the minimal College requirement for admission is a 2.0 overall average.

Students planning to qualify for teacher certification and earn a degree from the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences should check with their advisers and the College of Education and Human Services to determine the requirements for such certification.

Minimum and Maximum Load

A minimum of twelve hours in a semester is required for full-time status in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences.  No student enrolled in the College may enroll for more than nineteen hours in a semester without permission from the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies.

Credit by Examination Rules for Eberly College

Credit by examination provides students the opportunity to receive credit in courses by demonstrating that they have acquired sufficient knowledge of a subject without formal enrollment in a course or study in the classroom.  This opportunity is offered only to students enrolled full- or part-time at the University.  The initiation of a credit-by-examination request does not entitle a student to special in-class instruction or tutoring by an instructor.

Students may petition to receive credit by examination for any course listed by a department in the College as a course for which credit by examination is appropriately awarded.  Applications, course lists, and examination schedules are available each semester.

A student may apply to challenge a course for credit by examination if

  • The student is at the time of examination registered in the University
  • The student’s official record does not show credit for the course (i.e., any grade of S, P, A, B, C, D, or I)
  • The student is not officially enrolled in the course at the time of examination (a student who withdraws from a course after the end of the official registration period is officially enrolled in that course until the end of the semester, and not eligible to take the course by examination during that semester); and
  • A grade of F has not been recorded on the student’s record for the course within two calendar years of the date of the examination.  A student may challenge the same course by examination only two times

Credit only (not a grade) will be awarded for the successful completion of the examination with a grade of C or higher.  Because a comprehensive examination is used to establish credit, it is the policy of the College that a student should demonstrate at least an average (C) knowledge of course content to receive any credit.  The criteria for earning a C are made known in advance to students who request the information from the department offering the course examination.

A non-refundable fee is charged for credit by examination and must be paid within the prescribed period prior to each examination period.

Probation and Suspension

 

Academic Probation

After final grades are complete for the fall semester, the Registrar notifies students who have a GPA of less than a 2.00 and places them on Academic Probation until their GPA reaches the minimum 2.00.  Probationary students must remedy their deficiency during the spring semester.  Failure to do so will result in Academic Suspension.  A student whose GPA is below a 2.0 but is not low enough to qualify for suspension will remain on academic probation.

Eberly students who are placed on Academic Probation sign a contract which outlines schedule, meeting, and GPA requirements.  Please see the Eberly website for details.

NOTE: The plan of study and the probation contract will be used at the end of the semester if the student has to file an Academic Suspension and/or a Financial Aid appeal.

Dismissal from major

All Eberly majors require that student have a 2.00 overall.  At the discretion of the department and the Dean, students with a GPA of 1.9 may be retained within their major.  Students who have a GPA below a 1.9 are placed in the General Arts and Sciences major until they bring their GPA to the desired 2.00.  At that point, they can either go back to their original major, or switch to another major, either within or outside of the college.  Students in the General Arts and Sciences major are advised in the Undergraduate Office, where they can explore their major and career choices.  This is a temporary placement, usually for one semester. While students are listed in the General Arts and Sciences program, they must remain in contact with their desired program adviser, who will place a note in DW to attest the student’s visit.  The Associate Dean will remove the advising hold after students have also met with their desired program adviser.

Academic Suspension

After final grades are complete for the spring semester, based on their number of attempted hours, the Registrar notifies students who have a deficient GPA (http://catalog.wvu.edu/undergraduate/coursecreditstermsclassification/#Suspension_Guide ). 


Academic Suspension Appeals

Students can file an Academic Suspension appeal by filing a Suspension Appeal form, and send it to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies.  Please refer to College website for important deadline information.  The appeals are heard by a committee of faculty.

Readmission after suspension

Students who have been suspended need to reapply to the university.  When they come back to WVU, they are placed on Academic Probation until their GPA reaches a 2.00.  Students seeking readmission should consult the Undergraduate Studies Office webpage.

Graduation

There are two different processes that students must complete to graduate.

GRADUATION REVIEW

The semester before graduation, all candidates for undergraduate degrees in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences must register for graduation review in 221 Armstrong Hall, to allow their records to be evaluated for accuracy of curriculum and for completion of College and University requirements.  This process will allow degree candidates to be notified in a timely manner of deficiencies they might be able to address by registering for certain courses during their last semester.

GRADUATION and diploma APPLICATION

The semester of graduation, seniors will receive emails from the Registrar's Office and the Undergraduate Studies Office to remind them to fill out a diploma (graduation) application online through their MIX account.  Students should not submit their application for their diploma if their curriculum is displayed incorrectly in Degree Works; they should contact their adviser immediately to fill out the proper curriculum change forms.  Students will receive an email confirmation of application submission.  Subsequently, they will receive a conditional approval email, or a denial notification.  The conditional approval does not guarantee graduation.

If students do not graduate on the date for which they initially applied , they must re-apply at the beginning of the semester when they will be completing their requirements.  No candidate can graduate without completing an application for graduation and diploma.

Commencement Ceremony

In addition, students who wish to participate in the Commencement Ceremony (May or December) should register on line through the University Graduation website the semester of graduation.  Participation in the Commencement Ceremony does not mean that a student will graduate and be eligible to receive a diploma.


Administration

Dean

  • Robert H. Jones - Ph.D. (SUNY College)

Associate Deans

  • Joan S. Gorham - Ed.D. (Northern Illinois University)
    Academic Affairs
  • Valérie Lastinger - Ph. D. (University of Georgia)
    Undergraduate Studies
  • Asuntina S. Levelle - J.D. (West Virginia University)
    Financial Planning and Management
  • Tracy Morris - PhD
    Associate Dean for Research, Graduate Studies, and Outreach
  • Michael Perone - Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin)
    Faculty

Assistant Deans

  • Drew Chelosky - Assistant Dean for Development
  • Katie Stores - Ph.D. (West Virginia University)
    Assistant Dean for Research