This is an archived copy of the 2013-14 Catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.wvu.edu.

Public Health

Degrees Offered:

Master of Public Health

  • Biostatistics
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy, Management and Leadership
  • Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences

Master of Public Health (Online)

Master of Science

  • School Health Education

PhD in Public Health Sciences

  • Epidemiology
  • Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences

Certificate Programs

  • Applied Biostatistics Certificate 
  • Women's Health Certificate

INTRODUCTION

West Virginia University’s School of Public Health combines the excitement and challenge of a newly launched school with a well-established faculty and successful programs that focus on education, research, and service.
 
West Virginia University and its academic programs are accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) program is further accredited by the Council on Education in Public Health (CEPH). The WVU School of Public Health has been approved to conduct an intensive self-study as it transitions from an accredited program to a CEPH-accredited School of Public Health. M.P.H. Students from throughout the world who choose West Virginia University begin making a difference even before graduation. We truly believe in learning by doing.  Students remain engaged in community health throughout their training and complete practicum/internship experiences in diverse settings.  Our School Health Education program is nationally unique and attracts future leaders in education. The Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences prepares graduates for future careers in academia and research in a variety of settings.
 
School of Public Health faculty and staff involve students in their active research programs. Research efforts at the School often focus on the health of rural communities, consistent with our West Virginia roots. Students publish in leading peer-reviewed journals and present at national scientific conferences with their faculty mentors.
 
The practical and rigorous education WVU provides prepares our graduates to be effective professionals and competitive in today’s job market. Our established programs are growing quickly to meet the needs of our students and the substantial public health challenges that face our state. WVU School of Public Health alumni continue to improve the health of individuals and communities throughout the U.S. and around the globe.
  

MISSION

We train the coming generation of public health practitioners and researchers, and we identify and create solutions to prevent and reduce public health problems. 

VISION

The West Virginia University School of Public Health serves as a model for public health influence in our state, region, and beyond.

We are dedicated to a high-quality education for our students that:

  • Provides innovative, high-quality education programs with focus on research and service.
  • Prepares students to practice contemporary public health with emphasis on improving health and eliminating disparities in our region.
  • Educates students to design and implement high-impact prevention, intervention, evaluation, quality assurance, and disease and injury surveillance and research programs.
  • Delivers an innovative, rigorous graduate curriculum centered on a framework of preventing or alleviating health disparities in our region.
  • Attains diversity and inclusion for all graduate students.
For additional information about the School of Public Health or our many affiliates , which provide a wealth of research and service, please visit our website at http://publichealth.hsc.wvu.edu .

 

Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

The field of public health encompasses a number of specific disciplines whose mission is to prepare individuals to help improve the health and quality of life in the population through education, research, and service. Public health strategies are typically focused on broad, societal, and population levels; for example, environmental regulations, water quality control, immunization programs, and health education initiatives.

The M.P.H. program seeks students with a strong, genuine commitment to a career in public health. A M.P.H. degree is appropriate for health professionals as well as individuals with bachelors’ degrees from a wide-range of disciplines who have a strong interest in preventive medicine and community/population health. We welcome applications from mid-career professionals and from students who have recently completed a bachelor's degree.

 

Program Description

Public health is shaped by our nation's public health agencies via health assessment, policy development, and public health services. The WVU School of Public Health addresses these core functions through the M.P.H. degree with discipline-specific programs in the Departments of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Health Policy, Management and Leadership, Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, and Social and Behavioral Sciences. The MPH program prepares students for roles in decision-making in managed care and other integrated delivery systems, the medical products industry, health departments, and other governmental agencies, consumer groups, and community-based organizations. The M.P.H. program is accredited by the National Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). 
 

Admission Requirements

Please see each department for additional admission requirements.  
 
Please note that strong computer skills are needed to be successful in this program. The school has minimum computer/laptop systems requirements; every student will sign an agreement to abide by these. 
 
Since unforeseen circumstances and program implementation may necessitate changes in our curriculum, we encourage prospective and current students to visit the School of Public Health website at http://publichealth.hsc.wvu.edu/ for current requirements.
 
For more information about the MPH program, contact:
Leah Adkins, Educational Programs Senior Program Coordinator at leadkins@hsc.wvu.edu .
Or
Janet Hunt, Interim Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs at jhunt@hsc.wvu.edu .
P.O. Box 9190
WVU School of Public Health
Morgantown WV 26506
Phone (304) 293-2502
Fax (304) 293-3755

 

Master of Science (M.S.) in School Health Education

The M.S. degree in School Health Education is only open to applicants holding a professional teaching certificate and/or licensure (in any teaching area). A copy of your teaching certificate is required for admission. This program is a member of the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) .

 

Program Description

Students in this program will complete thirty credit hours of coursework. Students may transfer nine credit hours that are pre-approved, upon admission. All courses are offered on-line. Students can complete this degree in two years or less. The goal of the M.S. degree program in School Health Education is to provide teachers with the knowledge and skills necessary to instill in school-age students the information necessary to make healthy decisions regarding well-being. Experiential instruction, coupled with critical thinking skills, enables students to be informed health consumers. The program will provide an optimal experience to equip students to be models and mentors for their own students.
 

Admission Requirements

Please see each department for additional admission requirements.
 
Please note that strong computer skills are needed to be successful in this program. The school has minimum computer/laptop systems requirements; every student will sign an agreement to abide by these.
 
Since unforeseen circumstances and program implementation may necessitate changes in our curriculum, we encourage prospective and current students to visit the School of Public Health website at http://publichealth.hsc.wvu.edu/ for current requirements.
 
For more information about the M.S. program please contact:

Ruth E. Kershner, Ed.D., R.N.,  Professor at rkershner@hsc.wvu.edu
P.O. Box 9190
WVU School of Medicine
Morgantown WV 26506
Phone (304) 293-7440 or (304) 293-2502 

 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Health Sciences

The Ph.D. program in public health sciences is a degree for scientist-practitioners focused on prevention of premature mortality, morbidity, and disability resulting from communicable disease, chronic disease, and injury. The program offers specializations in three discipline-specific areas of public health: Social and Behavioral Sciences (117 credit hours), Epidemiology (114 credit hours), and Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences (117 credit hours). Detailed curricula are available at the School of Public Health website: http://publichealth.hsc.wvu.edu/ .
 

Goals of the Ph.D. Program

  • Educate and train the next generation of public health leaders, thereby producing a self-renewing cadre of teachers, researchers, and practitioners who will help shape and sustain the best public health practices.
  • Identify and address public health disparities.
  • Improve health and health care in West Virginia while simultaneously improving the economic competitiveness of the WVU Health Sciences Center, emulating peer training programs in other states.
  • Feature trans-disciplinary teaching and research in order for our graduates to be competitive and successful in high-level public health jobs, grants, and research opportunities.
  • Create a pool of talent for developing highly technical enterprises in West Virginia.

Program Description 

The first two years of the program emphasize research and statistical methods complemented by theoretical and process-oriented coursework relevant to the student’s selected area of specialty. In the first year, students take courses in the core areas of public health, scientific integrity and ethics, research writing, and research and statistical methodology, as well as seminars introducing them to pedagogy and faculty research. In the second year, students engage in required courses and electives in their specialty track and additional research study opportunities.
 
At the conclusion of the second year, students are matched with a mentor and transition to a funded faculty research project, lab, or group. The last two years will largely be dedicated to the dissertation proposal process and research; however, after qualifying exams, students also engage in teaching practica (to be determined by the student’s departmental advisor).
 

Qualifying Examination Summary

At the conclusion of the second year of coursework, students are required to pass a comprehensive qualifying examination. This comprehensive exam is based on core public health and discipline-specific material and administered by the student's dissertation committee. Students are only allowed to take the comprehensive exam twice. If a student fails the exam twice, they will be dismissed from the program.
 

Doctoral Dissertation Proposal

Upon successful completion of the qualifying exam, the student will set a date for the doctoral dissertation proposal defense. The proposal takes the form of a NIH or equivalent grant proposal including: specific aims, introduction, succinct yet detailed literature review, applicant capability, materials and research methodology, references, human subjects, and supporting documents. The proposal must be defended by the student in a forum that includes the student's complete Doctoral Dissertation Committee (comprised of five members).
 

Dissertation Summary

The program will culminate in a dissertation research project on an important public health topic. The dissertation can take the form of a traditional research dissertation or a series of three publishable papers or monographs on a related, important public health topic. The papers must be cleared for submission by the committee and submitted before the dissertation defense. We emphasize peer-reviewed research publications as desired outcomes because of their positive impact on skills and the professional placement options for our graduates. This is consistent with a trend in public health Ph.D. programs around the country.
 
The dissertation will be defended in a forum that has been announced to the school and university. All members of the Dissertation Committee must sign the dissertation approval form for the dissertation to be complete. The dissertation must be submitted following WVU policy regulating electronic submission of theses and dissertations.
 

Program Delivery

Most courses in the program will be taught using the face-to-face, on-campus, small, or large group format. A small number of core courses and some electives will be delivered by web-based technology.
 

Admission to the Program

Admission to the doctoral program is limited to highly qualified and motivated candidates. Competitive stipend support is offered to these students. The application deadline is February 15.
 
Please note that admission is preferentially given to US citizens and permanent residents. International students are considered for acceptance by the Admissions Committee if they have excellent academic credentials and research experience and can demonstrate stipend support for the duration of Ph.D. training from an individual source, government source, or by written agreement with a WVU HSC faculty mentor. Detailed admissions procedures, including online application materials, can be found at the School of Public Health website: http://publichealth.hsc.wvu.edu/ .
 
For more information contact:
 
Dr. Keith Zullig, Ph.D., MSPH 
Director, Ph.D. in Public Health Science programs
PO Box 9190
1 Medical Center Drive
Morgantown, WV  26505-9190
(304) 293-1091
kzullig@hsc.wvu.edu
 

 

Community Health Promotion Courses

CHPR 170. Health of the Individual. 3 Hours.

Examines personal health-related problems in terms of information, services, and actions, as they relate to attainment and maintenance of individual health.

CHPR 172. First Aid and Emergency Care. 2 Hours.

Emergency aid for the sick and injured. Emergency services aimed at reducing the potential of permanent disability or threats to life, as well as pain, damage, or suffering of a less serious nature.

CHPR 210. First-Aid Teaching Practicum. 3 Hours.

This class prepares students to conduct a first-aid course. Students work with the instructor in all aspects of course management. Students who complete this course are eligible to apply for instructor candidate training with the American Red Cross.

CHPR 250. History & Philosophy Health Ed. 3 Hours.

Provides the student with a historical perspective of health education's development, its present status, and its current philosophical foundations.

CHPR 260. Intro to Peer Health Education. 3 Hours.

Prepares students to become peer health educators through the study of health concerns of students in higher education and examination of effective teaching strategies that result in positive health outcomes.

CHPR 261. Advanced Peer Health Education. 3 Hours.

Students apply a variety of teaching strategies based on the peer concept to health concerns of college students and other young adults.

CHPR 265. HIV/STD Prev:Global Challenge. 3 Hours.

Addresses personal, social, legal, medical, and cultural aspects of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases and the health education efforts to stem the pandemic.

CHPR 270. Alcohol/Drug Ed for Athletes. 3 Hours.

Chemical use and dependency has a significant impact on people in all walks of life. An overview of chemical dependency and current prevention and intervention is presented.

CHPR 271. Health In The Community. 3 Hours.

Develops an understanding of the organization, structure, and function of official, voluntary, and professional community health components in terms of their protecting and maintaining the health of the community.

CHPR 275. Substanc Abuse:Student Leaders. 3 Hours.

Provides individuals, particularly those in organizational leadership roles, with an understanding of substance abuse, leadership roles, and decision-making skills for organizations.

CHPR 293A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CHPR 301. Elementary School Health Prgrm. 2 Hours.

PR: Junior standing. The organization, educational aspects, and personnel relationships involved in elementary school health services, healthful school living, and health education.

CHPR 302. Secondary School Health Prgrm. 3 Hours.

PR:CHPR 170 PR: CHPR 170 and CHPR 301. Overview of coordinated school health: organizational structure, community and national partnerships, and instructional modalities/evaluation of secondary school methods.

CHPR 305. Disease Across the Life Span. 3 Hours.

PR: CHPR 170. Students will identify causative factors, treatment, prevention, and educational implications for disease across the life span.

CHPR 320. Drug Alcohol Abuse Prevention. 3 Hours.

Experiences designed to prevent the development of abusive drug-taking relationships by focusing on psychological variables such as self-esteem, coping skills, and development of support networks.

CHPR 331. Accident Prev & Control Prin. 3 Hours.

Basic course which structures principles, concepts, and methodology of the safety movement into introductory experiences dealing with accident prevention and control efforts recommended for various social institutions and agencies.

CHPR 332. Safety Educ Principles/Content. 3 Hours.

PR: CHPR 331 or consent. Study and analysis of content areas usually recommended for instructional programs within the field of safety, with emphasis on structured learning experiences.

CHPR 333. Foundations Of Wellness. 3 Hours.

Provide students with physical, mental, emotional, and environmental health concepts and experiences that will expand their knowledge and skills. These relate to the processes and techniques for promoting and maintaining individual and community health changes.

CHPR 365. Men's Health. 3 Hours.

Optimal health is a theme for men across the lifespan. This course will address men's health specific to race, ethnicity and orientation, to provide skills to be an informed consumer of health information.

CHPR 375. Physical Lifestyle Management. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an experience conducive to the understanding, exploration, experience, and development of scientifically sound physical health behaviors within the framework of the Transtheoretical Model of Health Behavior.

CHPR 376. Mental Lifestyle Management. 3 Hours.

This course will provide experience conducive to the understanding, exploration, and development of mental, emotional, and spiritual health processes that comprise and support personal holistic health.

CHPR 380. Women and Health. 3 Hours.

Examination of theories, myths, and practices surrounding women's physical and mental health from both historical and present-day perspectives. Exploration of specific health issues and controversies and the rise of the women's health movement.

CHPR 400. School Health Teaching Seminar. 2 Hours.

PR: CHPR 250 and CHPR 301 and CHPR 302. This course is designed for students who plan to complete their student teaching requirement in health education. Format of the course will include lecture, discussion, and student teaching in a public school.

CHPR 436. Introduction-Worksite Wellness. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of health promotion in a worksite setting. Persons with interest in exploring the possibility of employment in health promotion in a worksite setting will find this course helpful.

CHPR 490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Teaching practice as a tutor or assistant.

CHPR 491. Professional Field Experience. 1-18 Hours.

PR: Consent. (May be repeated up to a maximum of 18 hours.) Prearranged experiential learning program, to be planned, supervised, and evaluated for credit by faculty and field supervisors. Involves temporary placement with public or private enterprise for professional competence development.

CHPR 493A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CHPR 494A-Z. Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Presentation and discussion of topics of mutual concern to students and faculty.

CHPR 495. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CHPR 496. Senior Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent.

CHPR 498A-Z. Honors. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Students in Honors Program and consent by the honors director. Independent reading, study or research.

CHPR 507. Community Hlth:Human Sexuality. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Analysis of sex-related issues including parenting, sex education, sexual sanctions, pornography, sexual dysfunction, and sexual variance. Designed for teachers, health professionals, and interested lay people.

CHPR 509. Community Hlth:Drug Education. 3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Designed to help students learn appropriate components of a drug education program, gain an understanding of drug taking in this society, and acquire insights into dependent behaviors.

CHPR 604. Advanced School Health. 3 Hours.

PR: Admission to the school health master's program. Course addresses the teacher's role in organizing and implementing comprehensive school health programs at the elementary and secondary levels. Additional attention is paid to providing instruction specific to the health educator skills and standards.

CHPR 613. Certified Health Ed Specialist. 1 Hour.

This course addresses competencies of a certified health education specialist (CHES), and prepares students for the national credentialing exam.

CHPR 614. Injury Prevention & Control. 3 Hours.

The injury control problem is examined as a public health concern. Strategies and programs for injury prevention are studied for implementation with target groups who are overrepresented within the injury problem.

CHPR 640. School Health Program Design. 3 Hours.

PR: Admission to school health master's program. Course provides a practical application experience for students to design a health education course curriculum, demonstrate classroom teaching, and self-evaluate their own teaching.

CHPR 650. Practicum. 1-12 Hours.

PR: Consent. Students are assigned to a field placement based on prior health promotion work experience. Under the supervision of faculty, students assume major responsibility for a program with a community health promotion organization. (Grading may be S/U.).

CHPR 655. Intro to Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

The course provides an overview of the health promotion/health education profession. Course material will assist health education/health promotion professionals-in-training to identify and pursue career goals.

CHPR 671. Public and Community Health. 3 Hours.

This course provides health educators with an introduction to community health focusing on organization, resources, programming, and special populations.

CHPR 680. School Health Concepts. 3 Hours.

Addresses content areas for health education, the national health education standards, the CDC adolescent risk factors, and healthy people 2010 objectives as applicable to: emotional health, injury prevention, disease and nutrition, and physical activity.

CHPR 690. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of community health promotion. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

CHPR 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CHPR 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

CHPR 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised topics not available through regular course offerings.

CHPR 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

CHPR 782. Suprvsd Appld Hlth Educ Projct. 1 Hour.

PR: Advanced graduate standing or consent. Doctoral students only. Plan and conduct a health education intervention in other than a classroom setting, i.e., a defined community.

CHPR 783. Suprvsd Hlth Educ Rsrch Report. 1 Hour.

PR: Advanced graduate standing and consent. Doctoral students only. A written report of empirical research of either a survey or an experiment.

CHPR 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of health-related learning experiences. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

CHPR 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Study may be independent or through specially scheduled lectures.

CHPR 792A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

CHPR 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

CHPR 794A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

CHPR 795. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CHPR 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

CHPR 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis (697), problem report (697), research paper or equivalent scholarly project (697), or a dissertation (797). (Grading will be S/U.).

CHPR 798. Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

CHPR 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

CHPR 900. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology.) These continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.

CHPR 930. Professional Development. 1-6 Hours.

Professional development courses provide skill renewal or enhancement in a professional field or content area (e.g., education, community health, geology.) These tuition-waived continuing education courses are graded on a pass/fail grading scale and do not apply as graduate credit toward a degree program.

Community Medicine Courses

CMED 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CMED 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CMED 697. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project.

CMED 698. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

CMED 699. Graduate colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework credit but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

CMED 712. Medicl Aspect-Envirnmtl Health. 1 Hour.

PR: MD degree or consent. A review of issues illustrating the responsibilities and professional interaction of physicians in indentifying, managing, and preventing casualties from environmental causes in air, water, soil, food, pesticides, and related subjects. (1 hr. lec.).

CMED 750. Statistics Biomedical Sciences. 1 Hour.

This introductory biostatistics course for biomedical graduate students covers variables and descriptive statistics as well as parametric and non-parametric statistics.

CMED 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of anatomy. Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

CMED 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

CMED 791. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hr. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

CMED 792A-Z. Directed Study. 1-6 Hours.

Directed study, reading, and/or research.

CMED 793A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

CMED 794A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

CMED 795. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

CMED 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. A one credit hour seminar is designed to assist students in identifying their career objectives and exploring opportunities to achieve their career objectives.

CMED 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

CMED 798. Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.

CMED 799. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking coursework but who wish to meet residency requirements, use of the University's facilities, and participate in its academic and cultural programs. Note: graduate students who are not actively involved in coursework or research are entitled, through enrollment in their department's 699/799 Graduate Colloquium to consult with graduate faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by their program, and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is P/F; colloquium credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters programs. Registration for one credit of 699/799 graduate colloquium satisfies the University requirement of registration in the semester in which graduation occurs.

Public Health Courses

PUBH 501. Advanced Professional Writing. 3 Hours.

A review of English syntax and usage in professional writing; constructing and developing ideas; research and writing based on careful reading of author's instructions, using the APA style manual, using library resources, and academic honesty.

PUBH 536. Worksite Wellness. 3 Hours.

Overviews the field of health promotion in a worksite setting, offering a comprehensive introduction. Persons with interest in exploring the possibility of employment in health promotion in a worksite setting will find this course helpful.

PUBH 580. Prevention through Resilience. 3 Hours.

The principles of resilience, resiliency theories and current research, resilience and stress and the mind-body implications, recognizing and eliciting resilience and resilient outlooks and behaviors in ourselves and clients, professional and public health implication.

PUBH 581. Rural Gerontology. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of current research information regarding health and social aspects of rural elderly in the United States. The course consists of lecture and class discussions.

PUBH 586. Public Mental Health. 3 Hours.

This course will teach the students the principles, concepts, and methods of general epidemiology, and how to apply them to the study of the distribution and causes of mental disorders in populations.

PUBH 595. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

PUBH 601. Intro Community/Public Health. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of community/public health with an emphasis on the relationship and role of public health to other disciplines in resolving public health problems.

PUBH 605. Intro to Global Public Health. 4 Hours.

This course identifies and explores major global issues in public health including epidemiology of infectious diseases, malnutrition, famine and water sanitation. Course may be graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

PUBH 617. Ethical/Legal Issues Pub Hlth. 3 Hours.

This course provides an opportunity for sustained reflection on the many ethical and legal issues involved in public health. Ethical and legal frameworks will be identified and applied to the analysis of critical issues.

PUBH 618. Hlth Serv/Outcoms Rsrch Mthds. 3 Hours.

This course covers the key issues facing the health care system today and teaches the basic skills needed to evaluate health care programs addressing these issues.

PUBH 628. Aging Women & Culture Issues. 3 Hours.

This course will use a multi-disciplinary approach to examine the impact of gender, race/ethnicity, and culture on aging and the aging population.

PUBH 645. Fundamentals of Gerontology. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to a broad spectrum of topics and issues related to aging by drawing upon several core disciplines and their contributions to the corpus of gerontological knowledge and research.

PUBH 646. Public Policy of Aging. 3 Hours.

Analysis of major policy and public programs for older adults, including Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security and the Older Americans Act. A major emphasis is placed on programs in West Virginia.

PUBH 662. Clinical Research Meth/Pract. 3 Hours.

Students learn research techniques for application to a wide variety of cardiovascular, neurological, trauma and social services emergency care, conduct real-time clinical research, and interact with patients/potential study subjects in the Emergency Department.

PUBH 680. Health-Based Leadership. 3 Hours.

PR:CHPR 635 or equivalent. Gain personal understanding, knowledge, and growth in the human dimensions of leadership: developing rapport, trust, teamwork, and mentoring; managing tone and facilitating "problem" situations; evaluating systems and leading system change; articulating vision, mission and strategy.

PUBH 685. Internship-Pub Hlth Practicum. 1-5 Hours.

The internship provides the students with the opportunity to develop their practical skills and enhance professional competencies by applying the knowledge and techniques gained from their MPH coursework to public health practice.

PUBH 686. Occupational Med Practicum. 5 Hours.

This course provides occupation medicine residents with the opportunity to develop practical skills and professional competencies by applying the knowledge and techniques gained from their MPH and occupational medicine coursework to public health practice.

PUBH 687. Practicum Proposal. 2 Hours.

PR: PUBH 611 and PUBH 630 and PUBH 650 and PUBH 660 and (PUBH 691E or CHPR 634). A structured, faculty-supported process for developing a proposal for the 300-hour practice and theory- based practicum.

PUBH 688. MPH Practicum Report. 3 Hours.

PR: PUBH 611 and PUBH 630 and PUBH 650 and PUBH 660 and PUBH 687 and PUBH 689 and (PUBH 691E or CHPR 634). Provides students with the opportunity to report the results of their practicum projects to others via a professional paper and presentation.

PUBH 689. Practicum. 3 Hours.

PR: PUBH 611 and PUBH 630 and PUBH 650 and PUBH 660 and PUBH 687 and CHPR 612 and (PUBH 691E or CHPR 634). Implementation of the practicum proposal; a planned, supervised, and evaluated public health-oriented experience encompassing 300 hours of activity reflecting public health practice and theory. Students are required to take 3 credit hours of the practicum but may spread credits among semesters.

PUBH 691A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

PUBH 693A-Z. Special Topics. 1-6 Hours.

A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments in the field.

PUBH 695. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Faculty supervised study of topics not available through regular course offerings.

PUBH 696. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. It is anticipated that each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his/her program.

PUBH 703. Social/Behavioral Measurement. 3 Hours.

Theory and development of effective tools for measuring social and behavioral public health phenomena. Students will learn how to find, construct and analyze effective social and behavioral measurement instruments.

PUBH 705. Injury Control Res Methods. 3 Hours.

PR: PUBH 660 or equivalent and PUBH 611 or equivalent. Evidence-based approach to increasing the knowledge and methodological skills necessary for basic injury (unintentional and intentional) control research.

PUBH 706. Current Research Issues. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to utilize research-based discussions to stimulate a unique information gathering environment of current research and investigation.

PUBH 707. Applied Multivariable Stats. 3 Hours.

Basic theory and application of survival analysis, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and exploratory factor analysis.

PUBH 766. Medical Toxicology. 2 Hours.

This course introduces healthcare providers to the clinical aspects of toxicology, including the evaluation and treatment of individuals and populations with potential toxic exposures.

PUBH 790. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of public health. Note: this course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It will also present a mechanism for students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. (Grading will be P/F.).

PUBH 791A-Z. Advanced Topics. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

PUBH 794A-Z. Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students.

PUBH 796. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his or her program.

PUBH 797. Research. 1-15 Hours.

PR: Consent. Research activities leading to thesis, problem report, research paper or equivalent scholarly project, or a dissertation. (Grading may be S/U.).

PUBH 798. Dissertation. 1-6 Hours.

PR: Consent. This is an optional course for programs that wish to provide formal supervision during the writing of student reports (698), or dissertations (798). Grading is normal.


Faculty

Interim Dean

  • Alan M. Ducatman - M.Sc. (City U. of NY)
    Professor, Toxic Exposure Worker's Compensation

Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

  • George Kelly - D.A. (Middle Tenn. St. U.)
    Professor, Meta-analysis, Effects of Physical Activity on Health Related Diseases

Interim Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

  • Ruth Kershner - Ed.D. (WVU)
    Professor, Coordinator - MS in School Health Education, Substance Abuse Education, Violence Prevention, Women's Health

Interim Assistant Dean for Academic Programs

  • Janet B. Hunt - M.P.H. (U. of Tenn)
    Teaching Assistant Professor, Practicum Director, Curriculum Development and Academic Public Health

Interim Chair

  • Matthew J. Gurka - Ph. D. (UNC)
    Department of Biostatistics, Associate Professor, Director of Biostatistics Consulting Group, Longitudinal Data Analysis, Model Selection, Power Analysis, Child Health, Childhood Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome
  • Michael Hendryx - Ph.D. (Northwestern)
    Department of Health Policy, Associate Professor, Management and Leadership, Health Policy and Health Disparities
  • Michael McCawley - Ph. D. (New York U.)
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, Research Professor, Air Pollution, Aerosols, and Occupational Health
  • Anoop Shankar - Ph.D. (Mahatma Ghandi U.)
    Department of Epidemiology, Professor, Cardiovascular Diseases, Diabetes Millitus, Hypertension, Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Keith Zullig - Ph. D. (U. of S.C.)
    Department of Socail and Behavioral Sciences, Associate Professor, Director - Ph. D. in Public Health Sciences, Adolescent Quality of Life Research, Measurement, Substance Use, and Community-Based Interventions

Professors

  • Jeffrey Coben - M.D. (U. of Pitt)
    Clinical Research Methods
  • Geri Dino - Ph. D. (Kansas State University)
    Management of Public Health, Tobacco Prevention
  • Edward J. Doyle - M.S. (Geo. Wash. U)
    Clinical Director, Institute of Occupational and Environemntal Health, Worker's Compensation, Repetitive Strain Disorders
  • Kimberly A. Horn - Ed.D. (WVU)
    Grant Writing, Tobacco Prevention, Health Disparities, Community-Based Participatory Research
  • Sarah Knox - Ph.D. (U. of Stockholm)
    Clinical and Population Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease, Epigenetics and Systems Biology
  • Ranjita Misra - Ph. D. (Old Dominion University)
    Diabetes and Metabolic Suyndrome
  • Ian R. H. Rockett - Ph.D (Brown U.)
    Epidemiology of Injury and Substance Abuse, Suicide Misclassification, History of Public Health
  • Pete Shaffron - Ed.D. (WVU)
    Interim Director, MPH Public Health Practice (online degree), Injury Prevention, Driver Behavior, Impact of Physical Fitness on the Older Driver

Associate Professors

  • Peter Giacobbi - Ph. D. (U. of Tenn.)
    Physical Activity, Epidemiology
  • Lan Guo - Ph. D. (WVU)
    Bioinformatics and Information Integration
  • Gerry Hobbs - Ph. D. (Kan. St. U.)
    Biostatistics
  • Kimberly Innes - Ph.D. (Cornell University)
    Epidemiology, Etiology, Chronic Age-Related Disorders

Assistant Professors

  • Rachel T. Abraham - M.D. (U. of Bangalore, India)
    Bridging the Gap Between Medicine and Public Health
  • Scott Cottrell - Ed. D. (WVU)
    Design and Instructional and Assessment Strategies
  • Stephanie Frisbee - Ph.D. (WVU)
    Health Policy, Policy and Epidemiologic Approaches to Pediatric Cardiovascular Health Outcomes
  • Kelly Gurka - Ph.D. (UNC)
    Epidemiology, Injury Prevention and Control, Maternal and Child Caree
  • Alfgeir Kristjansson - Ph.D. (Karolinska Institute)
    Social Research Methods, Substance Abuse Prevention
  • Dustin Long - Ph. D. (U. of North Carolina)
    Biostatistics
  • Juhua Luo - Ph. D. (Karolinska Institute)
    Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Health Disparities in Underserved Populations
  • Michael Mann - Ph. D. (University of Florida
    Adolescent Health
  • Toni Morris - M.S. (WVU
    Community Medicine, First Aid Instruction
  • Dougals Myers - Sc. D (U of Massachusetts
    Workplace Safety
  • Cecil Pollard - M.A. (WVU)
    Survey Research Methods, Collaborative Research Efforts
  • Kimberly Rauscher - Sc. D. (U. of Mass. at Lowell)
    Environmental Policy, Injury Control Epidemiology
  • Michael D. Regier - Ph. D. (University of British Columbia
    Biostatistics, Community Medicine
  • Nancy O'Hara Tompkins - Ph. D. (U of Md.)
    Youth Physical Activity, Obesity Prevention
  • Kimberly Williams - Ph.D. (McMaster U., Canada)
    Effects of Yoga Therapy on Low Back Pain
  • Motao Zhu - Ph. D. (SUNY at Albany)
    Injury Epidemiology

Assistant Research Professor

  • Melissa Ahern - Ph.D. (Fla. St. U.)
    Public Health Impacts of Energy Use
  • Stephanie Frost - Ph. D. (WVU)
    Influence of Build and Social Environments on Health Behavior and Factors Influencing Childhood Obesity
  • Christa L. Ice - Ph. D. (Vanderbilt University)
    Pediatrics

Research Instructors

  • Thomas Bias - Ph. D. (WVU)
    Public Health Policy, Obesity Prevention, Built Environment, Community Development, Program Evaluation
  • Kristi Kelly - M. Ed. (WVU)
    Meta-Analysis, Effects of Physical Activity on Health-Related Diseases
  • Lucas Moore - Ed.D.(WVU)
    Public Health Policy

Instructor

  • Bobbi Sykes - M.S. (WVU)
    Teaching Instructor, Internship Coordinator, Public Health Practice, Care Management and Access to Care

Emeritus

  • Rick Briggs - Ed.D. (WV)
  • Billy R. Carlton - Ed. D. (U of Tenn.)
  • Karen K. Douglas - Ph. D. (Tex. Women's U.)
  • John Pearson - MPH (Yale U.)
  • William E. Reger-Nash - Ed.D. (WVU)

Senior Program Coordinator

  • Leah A. Adkins